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Parchment Paper!


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I am currently using "Reynolds Genuine Parchment Paper".

 

This is also the brand I use as well. All of the parchment will curl when it first hits the water. Just smooth it out and it'll relax. I have to do that all the time. As for drying time, it depends on your environment first and foremost. The more humid your climate the more time it takes it dry out. I find that my paint says moist longer if it is in a nice round blob. If I've thinned it out with water it seems to dry faster.

 

Also, if you are wanting to walk away from your palette and keep the paint wet, ring out the sponge, put the parchment back on it, close the lid and stick it in the fridge. The paint will congeal but when you hit it with water again it'll be usable.

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I bought a Loew Cornell 385 paint saver palette at a local Michael's (on line they're cheap...I think shipping would be the killer ::): ). Cost me about $7-8, and that was before the obligatory 40% coupon. I think I had to supply my own sponge (I have a package of replacement wet palette sponges, but Paper Towels or a large kitchen sponge would probably work too.)

 

It's only 4" x 7.5" and perfect for me as I only work on small areas at a time. After about a month, I can toss the parchment paper. I use Surfas brand (it's probably a repackaged brand, Surfas is our local commercial kitchen supply house) and I pre-cut a bunch of sheets to fit the palette. I also reroll the paper opposite of how it comes out...trying to minimize curl. I then store the cut sheets pressed in a big Anatomy Reference book I have handy.

 

I use the super hot prep technique. I immerse the paper in very hot water for a few minutes, then lay it out on the thoroughly soaked sponge. I actually lay pennies on each of the corners of the paper (+ one under the sponge) to help keep the paper in contact with the moist sponge. Occasionally, I do get paint creeping under a penny when I'm not careful, but it's not that bad of a problem.

 

So far, it's a wonderful thing! I've tried many Jerry Rigged wet palettes and I think this one's a keeper!

 

-AW

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A kitchen sponge will not work very well. Any type of sponge with a rough surface (usually because of the holes) doesn't keep enough of the sponge in contact with the paper to work very well.

 

I am completely new to wet-palettes use, however, the other night I played around a bit to see what would work well.

 

I seemed to get good results from using Reynold's Parchment Paper, prepping the paper with a just-boiling water soak for about five minutes, followed by a cool water rinse.

 

I placed a kitchen sponge in a disposable sandwich-sized tupperware container, soaked thoroughly, leaving standing water at the bottom of the container but below the half-way point of the height of the sponge.

 

On top of this, I laid a few sheets of wet paper towel, and on top of that I smoothed on the parchment paper, working out any air bubbles as though I was applying wallpaper or tinting a car window.

 

This seemed to work great. you get the ability to keep alot of water in your pallete without oversoaking your parchment paper. The sponge acts as a wick to draw up from the reservoir of water at the bottom of your tray, which is then wicked into the paper towel which keeps a good, solid, and flat contact with the actual Parchment paper (No worries about the gaps between the parchment and the air pockets of the sponge this way). Plus, because the pool of water is below the half-way point of the sponge- you don't have to worry about your pallete washing away on a float of water, either.

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A kitchen sponge will not work very well. Any type of sponge with a rough surface (usually because of the holes) doesn't keep enough of the sponge in contact with the paper to work very well.

 

I am completely new to wet-palettes use, however, the other night I played around a bit to see what would work well.

 

I seemed to get good results from using Reynold's Parchment Paper, prepping the paper with a just-boiling water soak for about five minutes, followed by a cool water rinse.

 

I placed a kitchen sponge in a disposable sandwich-sized tupperware container, soaked thoroughly, leaving standing water at the bottom of the container but below the half-way point of the height of the sponge.

 

On top of this, I laid a few sheets of wet paper towel, and on top of that I smoothed on the parchment paper, working out any air bubbles as though I was applying wallpaper or tinting a car window.

 

This seemed to work great. you get the ability to keep alot of water in your pallete without oversoaking your parchment paper. The sponge acts as a wick to draw up from the reservoir of water at the bottom of your tray, which is then wicked into the paper towel which keeps a good, solid, and flat contact with the actual Parchment paper (No worries about the gaps between the parchment and the air pockets of the sponge this way). Plus, because the pool of water is below the half-way point of the sponge- you don't have to worry about your pallete washing away on a float of water, either.

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