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Drilling and pinning


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I am wanting to venture into drilling and pinning some of my large figures to make them more stable. I have a Mithril  large Smaug vignette that keeps falling apart, for example.

 

So, what kind of equipment/ drill bits do I need? What size of wire do I use and where in blazes can I get stuff like that??

 

Thanks in advance.

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Xacto makes a very nice hand held and hand powered pin drill.  It comes with three different sized bits.  Tiny ones are meant for the smallest minis and the alrger ones are for larger jobs.

 

The area that is to br drilled should be smooth and free from dirst and grime.  Then I would mark exactly where you want to drill in indelible pen.  Then drill.  Depending on how fast you are moving the drill you might want to ease up now and then to avoid to much friction on the bit.

 

Once the holes are drilled, insert the pin of your choice (usually a piece of wire) and apply a amall amount of epoxy or cyanoacrylate glue and quickly put the two pieces together.  The bond should hold and you will have a strong join.

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What size of wire do I use and where in blazes can I get stuff like that??

There are those who use paper clips... And there are those (like yours truly) who use actual sewing pins with the heads snipped off... And there are those who use all manner of hobby shop wire and so forth.

 

Your choice, really. You want something strong enough so as not to readily bend, yet able to be easily sheered with clippers. I once bought some wire that actually notched my clippers. Watch out.

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Indeed. My clippers won't cut through regular paperclip steel without getting a dent, so I reserve them for plastic and pewter only. To cut paperclips I use a regular nose pliers, the type that come bundled in most car toolkits.
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You have to make certain that your wire cutters are made for cutting heavier wire. Jewelry wire cutters are made for soft metals like silver and gold, not steel. I use a pair of Stanley heavy duty wire cutters for all my wire cutting needs. These will sheer through floral stems in nothing flat without denting.  :D

 

As for wire, it depends on the model. For a hand or something really small, I'll use a sewing pin. For dragons or large critters, that floral wire is good stuff, and since I have a ton of it from when I was doing some flower arrangements (I still have one more to do) it's going to last me a long time.

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I use pretty small (size 74, 75, or 76) drill bits, a hand-held pin vise (hand drill), and brass rod to match the bit, all to be found at your average railroading-type hobby shop (and probably online as well, though I can normally find a local shop so I don't need to order them that way...).  In my experience, brass rod is strong enough for everything you'd need to pin, and even jewelry clippers can cut through it without denting.

 

--Anne

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for me it's the laughing evil-blotchy frog-demon. I'm going to put it together this weekend, but Don't have good way to drill. Also short of funds, due to my house-buying spree (yes, only one, but this much money, it's a spree anyway).

 

So...what does it cost to get a dremel? What size drill bits fit paperclips & what size fits sewing pins or needles?

 

Do I have to have a vise? Strongly recommended? How much does a vise cost?

 

Thanks. I really like this mini & want to do it right, but I have to know what I'm getting into b4 i start spending a lot of money...

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the pin vise is a hand drill, not a vise (no clue where the name came from)  

 

I got mine from my FLGS for $13, it is a GW product, one of the few I own.

 

it was a set of 3?bits and the drill itself.

 

PM if you need a hand finding one

 

xacto makes one for under $6

 

cbs

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I have both a Dremel and a pin vise. I have had a problem finding bits for the Dremel that are small enough for some of the more delicate pinning I have had to do. A pin vise is a small rod, one end twists to loosen the area for the bit, then tightened once the bit is inserted to keep it secure. Actually drilling with the pin vise is done exactly like using a screwdriver. The bits for the pin vise are ideal for smaller pinning needs. My Xacto pin vise with 3 bits cost me $10.50 from my local hobby shop.

 

 

D'oh, ladystorm got her reply posted first.  :p

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I think I have 3 or 4 pin vices now.  My favorite is a swivel heap pin vice from Sears Hardware.  I think is was around $6.  The end of the vice opposite the bit has a large, flat swivel head.  This braces in your palm so you can spin the drill with your finger while the head stays fixed in your palm.  Its an easier motion and it helps get everything steady so you drill a straight hole.

 

Sears will also sell tiny drill bits.  Simply pick the drill bit that's small enough for your needs and buy thin metal rods or thick wire of the same size.  Instant match.  You can even pick up several sizes of drill bits and wire for heavier and more delicate pin jobs.  I strongly recommend always having at least one spare bit of each size you use regularly.  They do snap from time to time under heavy use/pressure.  Better to spend the extra $2 than have to run to the store in the middle of a project.

 

I use 'knock-around' heavy-duty wire clippers to cut with.  That way, I don't really care if I dent the edge on hard metal, which actually hasn't happened yet.

 

I bought a variable speed, 25,000 RPM cordless Dremel for $44.00 from Home Depot.  After going to Michaels, Pat Catans, Sears and Wal-Mart I found they had better prices on all models, at least at that time.  They also had the best selection of accessories.  They do make variable speed models up to 35,000 RPMs, but not in cordless versions.  I think the cordless is easier to hold/manuever and is just nice in case you want to take it somewhere.  25,000 RPM should be more than sufficient for any hobby use, or even hardware use.  I rarely use mine at top speed.  My model comes with a 3 hr charger.  Dremel sells both spare batteries and a 1 hr quick charger.

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Speaking of Dremels....

 

 

I want to ask for one for Christmas from my Dad, but I need to make certain I get a proper model number so he doesn't just get me some drill.

 

What's the model number of the cordless Dremels that most people here use?

 

Also, which bits?

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What's the model number of the cordless Dremels that most people here use?

 

Also, which bits?

I'll look at my Dremel when I get home, but...

 

When I went to Home Depot, they had a ton of these free Dremel catalogues by the display.  The catalogue shows all the different models, accessories and bits that Dremel sells.  You may want to consider picking one up, highlighting the model numbers you want, and handing it to your father.  With both model number and pictures, it should be hard for him to get the wrong stuff.

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