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Krylon black primer + plastic minis


TKD
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(chiming in late to second the recommendation for Floquil...it's faaabulous.  Really pricey, though, so I only use it on pieces with super-fine detail.  Not worthwhile on most models anyway.)

 

I melted some plastics with paint stripper back when I was a newbie, but I never would have suspected Krylon of the same evils.  So sorry, TKD!

 

Jennifer

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I've used the Tamiya flat white primer, it does put down a fantastic smooth almost semi-gloss coat that yet covers very well. I'm not sure how it compares to Floquil though. Only problem is it is made in Japan and you'll probably pay a great deal more for it most places.

 

I've been uses plain Kryon flat white for primer for some time now and not had many problems. Sometimes it does come out gritty but I'm sure it was due to me letting the paint dry before it hits the figure.

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Recent experimentation suggests to me that the paint will need at least 36 hours to fully harden- primers are much quicker. I've primed polystyrene minis (not polystyrene foam!) with flat black PAINT and had no problems, and as of yesterday I have also used Krylon "Fusion" "for plastics" "self-priming" paint with no meltage. However I don't know if the Krylon here is a rebadged local product.

 

However any kind of enamel or spray paint will instantly digest styrofoam. Some solvents will eat most plastics. "Polystyrene cement" or "Poly cement" actually works by melting the surface a little to weld the plastic parts together.

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Does their all-purpose primer have acetone or something of the sort in it?

 

 

Yes, acetone is the first ingredient listed.

 

I use the 1315 all purpose white for nearly everything, though I have taken lately to priming black then white over it, which has helped these old eyes find shadowing a little easier.

 

That said I can not recall every melting anything down accidentally :devil: using Krylon.

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Am I crazy in just using thinned white craft paint as my primer? Am I missing out on a whole new level of quality here? Or is it just a speed thing?

 

I don't trust spray anything (except testors dullcote), as I do not find even the "hobby" spray paints fine enough.

Yes, undercoating with paint pretty much defeats the primary prupose of priming. You could just as easily put an extra base coat on.

 

Primer is used because paint doesn't bond with metal well. When you paint of the metal, it's very easy for paint to get rubbed/scratched off. Primers are chemically different than paint. They are designed to bond better with the surface you put them on and then your paint bonds to the primer. This creates a more durable coat that is harder to rub/scratch off. This is the primary purpose of a primer. The effects of painting over different colors is secondary.

 

If you don't like sprays, there are brush on primers and they are chemically different from regular paint.

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For plastic and resins I always use a brush on artist gesso. I never use primer. Don't ask me why, it is just something I picked up from my model horse hobby and have always done/used. An $8 bottle will go a long way when painting small plastic minis and resins. Just my two cents worth.

LT

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I've been using Rust Oleum Painter's Touch Sandable Primer - White and Grey and Black for some time now. I was experimenting with the difference primer colors as a base. So far, I'm not leaning towards any particular cult, although most of my earlier minis have white primer because that's what I started with. Although it has been great for metal miniatures, it does contain acetone and other plastic unfriendly chemicals, so I wouldn't advise it for that.

 

I am curious if perhaps the plastic the miniatures are made from is different than the plastic the bases are made from. This could be why the paints are effecting them differently. With the degree of detail required in a miniature, versus the usual slab of plastic of a base, might the mini plastic be softer and more succeptible to solvents? Organic Chemistry-Fu anyone?

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I would expect the plastic bases to also be made from polystyrene, because it injection molds well.

 

Floquil is owned by Testor's (based out of Rockford IL according to the can). It is a bit expensive compared to some other primers, but when I compare the benefits to the costs, I think it's worth it. If you are painting hundereds of figures for an army, then it probably wouldn't be.

 

In places where I've seen both, the prices are fairly close per ounce between Floquil and Tamiya primers.

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Hey, you can also get Floquil primer at Gaming Stores, if the shop owner is savy. I've tried Floquil and I like it a lot, but it is kind of pricey. Still cheaper than Tamiya and a little easier to find.

 

Tamiya is wonderful stuff. Sometimes it's almost too smooth; I've had thinned paint shimmey on the surface. Had to put down a less-thinned base coat before the paint would adhere.

 

In addition, Tamiya Fine white primer is for plastics, and while it works just fine on metal, I would think that it wouldn't damage plastics like they Krylon you used.

 

As someone already mentioned, Krylon has a paint called Fusion that is specifically for plastics, though it says it will work on a wide variety of surfaces, including wood. I have the stuff but haven't used it.

 

My new fave, both white and black, is Duplicolor Sandable Primer. Wonderfully smooth, goes on nice even in Florida's horrendous humidity (primed a bunch of stuff during one of the hurricanes, if you can believe that.) It's also inexpensive and not too hard to find. Black is available at Walmart, while automotive stores carry both black and white.

 

If you don't like spray primers, Reaper and Vallejo Game Color have brush on. The Vallejo needs to be thinned. Reaper seems thin enough out of the bottle, but it's a pain to use the little screw-top pot. I got one of those flip-top Citadel pots for mine. Reaper must be OK; Anne kept bumming mine at Origins because she didn't have any.

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I have yet to see Fusion as a primer (i.e. even just a flat white); at least my local Wal-mart doesn't have it...

 

I've been using Rustoleum's plastic primer to use on 20mm Hat historical figures. Works well enough, if a little grainy. Works poorly on other, softer plastics (like Revell's 20mm stuff). If anyone knows were to get a flat white Krylon Fusion spray, let me know...I NEED IT!

 

For regular, styrene molded plastics I use regular model spraypaint. Flat white. Anything else is uneccessary...

 

Damon.

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I have yet to see Fusion as a primer (i.e. even just a flat white); at least my local Wal-mart doesn't have it...

 

I've been using Rustoleum's plastic primer to use on 20mm Hat historical figures. Works well enough, if a little grainy. Works poorly on other, softer plastics (like Revell's 20mm stuff). If anyone knows were to get a flat white Krylon Fusion spray, let me know...I NEED IT!

 

For regular, styrene molded plastics I use regular model spraypaint. Flat white. Anything else is uneccessary...

 

Damon.

Ya kiddin me, Lars? I got a can of Satin, dark green a couple of weeks ago - figured it would be cool for the Lizardmen; put on a dark green primer then drybrush lighter shades of green

 

I did that with Citadel Dark Angels green paint; didn't realize it's PAINT, not PRIMER, stuff is chipping. ::(:

 

Of course, I've been going to a Super Walmart - I guess the regular stores don't have as much stuff.

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I don't think Krylon fusion is supposed to be used over a primer. I believe it was designed specifically to bond with plastics. Therefore, if you used a primer, I think you would be defeating the purpose of the fusion line of paints.

 

I would suggest using the fusion in whatever color you want. If you can't find white fusion, you can always paint white over it. I would use krylon fusion like it was a primer for plastic.

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Let me tell you guys a secret...I've been keeping it to myself, but what the hey.

 

I've been painting, airbrushing, murals etc...for over 20 years okay, I've only been painting minis for about 1 year though, and I'll tell you what I've found to be the ULTIMATE in primer for metal and plastic minis...

 

DESIGN MASTER FLAT WHITE #726 COLORTOOL Floral Spray.

 

available at Michael's hobbies. It never goes on fuzzy or thick. It leaves a beautiful eggshell like finish while leaving all of the details intact. It's microfine and perfect. You will love. Oh yeah, it dries almost instantly as well. I usually give it a couple of hours to "Outgas" before painting over it, but it is hands down the best spray primer. Airbrushing is the way to go, but for convenience and ease of use, go with the Design Master.

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