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Never Painted *Anything* In My Whole Life


Sharpe
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Greetings! :)

 

I just started my collection last week and since then, I've bought more than $500 worth of minis. Don't know how many I have, but there are a ton of them. Better than 75% are Reaper's Dark Heaven Legends. The miniatures are all for my D&D-style table-top role-playing game sessions.

 

Here's my plan to get them fielded as fast as possible:

 

Part 1: Glue them together, glue them to their base, primer them all black or white for ones that will be more light colored.

 

Part 2: Play with them like that as I complete Part 3.

 

Part 3: Start painting and basing them one by one.

 

Is there a glaring error there? The thing is, I see a lot of people paint minis before they assemble them. I understand that's so it's easier to get in the crevasses, but I want to field my minis before I die. :) Since I've never painted anything (even a wall) in my whole life, this is going to be a huge learning experience, one that's going to take some considerable time. I'm sure when I start out, the minis will look better UNpainted!

 

My second question is this: can I strip or just repaint my minis after completing them? I'm sure once I've painted 100 minis, the ones I do last will look 100 times better than my first ones.

 

Thanks for the advice!

 

-Sharpe

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One thing I would suggest, if you are fielding groups of monsters for your game, is to paint several which use the same colors at once.

 

Pre-assembling is fine for gaming and quick-paint minis. ::):

 

The different colored primers have the following advantages:

 

1. Black primer will make whatever color you put over it look darker. You can leave black in the cracks and low areas, creating "ready-made" shadows.

2. White primer will make colors you put over it look brighter. This is a real help if you are going to be using washes; the lighter your base coat, the more your washes will bring out the details of the sculpt.

 

If you paint in groups, I recommend doing three or five models at a time. That way, it doesn't take you so long that you get discouraged, but you still get that sense of gratification when you finish a group. ::):

 

--Anne

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Slow down little Grasshopper! :lol:

 

I totally understand the virtually overwhelming excitement, but try take things one step at a time. I recommend that you hold off on primering your minis until you ready (or close to ready) to paint them. Two reasons: First off if you are gaming with them in the mean time you will be rubbing off the primer and getting it greasy with your fingers, which kinda defeats the purpose of primer. Second, your initial ideas about color scheme (light vs dark) might change as time goes on and suddenly the figure you primed in black is now needed to be painted in bright yellows! ::o: Not to mention the fact that your skills will grow as time goes on. Including how well you "clean" your minis (removing mold lines and repairing casting flaws), how well you assemble/pin and how well you apply primer. The learning curve is pretty steep in the beginning. Take advantage!

 

If you hold onto your horses you will thank me later. Your dudes aren't going anywhere.

 

Laters,

Jen

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I can add a couple of thoughts.

 

1) You may want to pick a few figures that you will not need for your game for a while and start with those. This will help keep the feeling of having to rush at bay while you paint. Also, if you start with miniatures that don't need to assemble, you can concentrate on the painting part first. Once you are comfortable with the paint process, you can move on to more complex miniatures.

 

2) Once you start painting a miniature don't use it for gaming until its finished and sealed. This will keep the paint from rubbing off during gaming.

 

3) There are lots of ways to strip the paint of your miniatures (
), but I would suggest that you don't do that. As you improve (and you will improve) it helps to look back at your previous work to see how much you have improved. I have miniatures that I painted when I first started that still make me cringe to look at but I love to see how far I have come.

 

4) Make use of this forum and others to get help. Also, see if your local game store has painting clubs or classes. I haven't met a painter yet who is willing to help out.

 

5) Lastly, have fun. Above all else, you should be having a good time with painting.

 

 

Cheers!

Max

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I would also add that you may be able to find friendly forumites near you who you can join for painting or just hanging out. Just mention where you are and see if anyone's nearby. That and Reapercon is coming up in May. If you can make it there, there's a huge amount of people who'd love to hang out and paint, and chat, and paint some more. :lol:

 

DRG

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Three words:

 

BUY HOT LEAD!

 

You won't regret it.

 

If the price is a little too steep for you, then go with Learn to Paint kit 1 or 2. Anne has written wonderful guides and if you pick up both sets you already have some practice minis, a couple bottles of key colors and some decent starter brushes that after you graduate to Kolinsky Sable brushes, work well for mixing paint or tasks that may be damaging to a higher quality brush.

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Pretty much what everyone else has said, & since you are going to be using these as RPG figures (non-painting gamers can be a bit rough on paintjobs, not to mention the occasional errant die) I recommend using a product like Army Painter Quickshade, to both cheat a bit & put a bulletproof protective finish on your minis. Here's some early examples, back when I first started using the stuff: Linky

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So, yeah, what they said.

 

If you want to field things really quick, alot of people will put a wash of blue or black ink on to help pop up the structure of the sculp. This also helps you see tiny defects to fix during prep and it's trivial to remove before you prime. I don't think I'd primer everything up front - but that's already been explored pretty thoroughly.

 

Stripping down minis for do overs is quite common, whether its something you started and didn't finish, or something you picked up in an auction lot or from a friend. I like Simple Green, pinesol's not terrible, but everyone has their methods. I'll second Max and say steer clear of stripping down your finished minis - having physical examples of your work for posterity and comparison is rewarding.

 

The other thing to realize is, everyone here will readily admit to having 1) a shelf of shame full of minis they started but haven't yet finished painting and 2) a stack of blisters to the ceiling that they bought this week in case they need them. 500 in week one sounds like a great start in this hobby to me!

 

~OT

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I see a lot of people paint minis before they assemble them. I understand that's so it's easier to get in the crevasses...

I'm curious about this myself. I'd like to try it but how is this done, i.e. how does the painter hold the mini? Tweezers?

By 'mini,' I meant 'accessory,' btw.

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I'm curious about this myself. I'd like to try it but how is this done, i.e. how does the painter hold the mini? Tweezers?

By 'mini,' I meant 'accessory,' btw.

 

For parts you want to paint before attaching, I like to put the pinning wire into the piece before I start. I leave it a bit long, then glue it into a standard holder, like a bottlecap or cork. This way, I can just clip it free when I'm done painting, and attach it to the rest of the piece using the same wire. That's easier than tweezers because you can set it down w/o hurting the paintjob. I also have a set of extrahands with the little alligator vices, that's handy too.

 

For full size minis, I prefer poster tack - the blue stuff seems to work really well.

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No. You actually don't remove the pin from the accessory. You leave it glued in there and just clip away some of the extra length but still have a nib sticking out. You drill a receiving hole into the corresponding socket of the main mini and the nib is inserted there. Basicly the pin is glued into both sides and helps to strengthen joint.

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