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Liquid Green Stuff??


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Millput has that ability so you might want to look into that.

 

I've used two part epoxy for gap filling, depending on the size of the gap. My dragon turtle has all the gaps filled with two part epoxy, mostly for the additional bond.

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What is liquid poly?

 

 

Errr... not sure exactly, if it's a glue or something, but you can get Humbrol brand (the kind my dad used to use to put his airfix kits together with) I might be thinking of something different (liquid cement perhaps) I'm not entirely sure.

 

Thanks for the pointer to milliput Rastl, i'll look into that as well.

 

Jay

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Thanks for the pointer to milliput Rastl, i'll look into that as well.

Milliput, Aves Apoxie Sculpt, and Magic Sculpt have similar properties. They can be diluted with water and painted on, and work well as gap fillers that can be sanded after they cure. I've only used standard Milliput, but I've heard some people prefer the superfine white Milliput. Others don't like the way superfine white dilutes down, so take that for what it's worth. Milliput was the only one I could find locally, at Hobby Lobby, and it is the only one I've tried out personally.

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By liquid poly would you be talking about a gap filling polystyrene glue?

 

Orcsoul:

Not entirly sure tbh, i've done a bit of searching on t'internet and found these type things:

 

The Model Catalogue

Airfix

 

but these are glues/adhesives, so I'm not sure if i'm having my leg pulled or not.

 

Serenity:

Thanks for the info, i'll have to take a look at those others as well

 

Jay

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I don't know about green stuff, but I have heard milliput can be thinned with water and tamiya putty can be thinned with acetone - this is in a dvd, I think the Jeramie Bonamant one - I've only seen a little of it.

 

I used the tamiya thinned (with acetone) for a wizard mini with a lot of pock-marks on his cloak. When I started painting him, I noticed that his hand needed to be fixed up - a misaligned mould, as I had fixed the top of his cloak where the lines were with quite a lot of effort for a beginner, so his hand at the back and wrist at the front didn't line up. I set about stripping him, which stripped the putty off and I instantly could see the huge difference and how much better it had looked after I had applied the putty. Tamiya is paste-like and comes in a tube of white or grey, I believe. Easily sanded. It says its for plastic up front but the website does say it is suitable for metals. Used with their lacquer thinner, it can also be used for plastics, as the packaging tells me.

 

This is just what I have used. I have yet to purchase any milliput, although I would like to. The hobby shops are just too damn far away.

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What you may be thinking of is "Squadron Green Putty". It can be thinned with liquid styrene cement like to what Testors makes. By adding the liquid cement it allows the putty to adhere to the plastic surface more readily and thins it so it can be brushed on. This will also work with Testors white "countour putty".

 

Keep in mind, neither one of these putties are epoxies. They cure by air drying, not by a chemical reaction of mixing two parts like Kneadatite (greesntuff) or Milliput. I have thinned milliput with water to a paste-like consistency but had difficulty in it maintaining its integrity after curing. It became brittle and chalky.

 

You may want to check out Magic Smooth. It is a two-part epoxy that begins as a goo the consistency of Vaseline or honey. It's made by the same folks who make Magic Sculp which is another epoxy like Aves and Milliput. After mixing the two parts (in a cup or on a flat surface) you can apply the material with a toothpick or brush, etc. I have used it to patch sculpts that I've broken. It vulcan molds just fine. I coated the chain for the Hania figure with it to fill in the gaps so it could be molded. It's a very useful material to have on your workbench when nothing else works quite right.

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Thanks for the pointer to milliput Rastl, i'll look into that as well.

Milliput, Aves Apoxie Sculpt, and Magic Sculpt have similar properties. They can be diluted with water and painted on, and work well as gap fillers that can be sanded after they cure. I've only used standard Milliput, but I've heard some people prefer the superfine white Milliput. Others don't like the way superfine white dilutes down, so take that for what it's worth. Milliput was the only one I could find locally, at Hobby Lobby, and it is the only one I've tried out personally.

 

I highly recommend standard milliput, the red and white box. The super fine milliput, I had some and used it on a base. It took a month to dry for some reason. It was not submerged in water, it was mixed well, and I put it under a heat lamp but still would not harden. Never had this issue with the standard stuff.

 

You can also use Tamiya putty with acetone. The putty dries incredibly fast but you just mix acetone in it and it thins out so you can paint it on. I use this for most of my gap filling when the gaps are really fine but visible. You can also sand this down once it dries as well. It dries faster than milliput and is less of a headache in my opinion.

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