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An odd question..


Enchantra
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Many people dislike the shiny look that typically accompanies gloss sealants.  It's a little hard to imagine cammo-covered soldiers when they gleam.  ;)

 

Matte doesn't have that - so you get a more "realistic" look, but at the cost of protection.  For armor (CAV, battlesuits, etc), I like the gloss, unless I am going for a more realistic look - then it's gloss followed by matte.

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I do not like shiny figures. Gloss makes them glossy, and I dislike that. I want them to look like how I painted them - the dullcote is there to protect my paint job, not gloss it up. I'll gloss up the parts I want glossy.

 

FWIW, I use either a gloss or a non-matte matte (Armory, ahem) as my first coat, then I hit it will dullcote to matte it. That gets me the protective value of gloss and the matte quality I like.

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I hate gloss but I'm not too crazy about dead flat either, I tend to go the gloss then flat way others have posted here but I like to give them a light 'dusting' with semi-gloss afterward to give back a lil 'sparkle'.

 

And on female figures I like to hit the hair with a lil semigloss outta the bottle. Totally flat looks dull and lifeless to me, but gloss is just too much.

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Yep what they said, and I find if I want glossy bits then I use a bit of ink extendender or just an ink and that usually adds a bit of semi-gloss to bits. Also seeing as I photograph everything with a digital camera, it hads a little gloss in the pictures so I like to reduce it where possible.  :D
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:p warning: snotty, spoiled brat comments to follow :p

 

 

 

I use matte when I think it will look good to me, I use satin when I think it will look good to me, and I use high gloss when I like, and I frenquently use some of this and that and the other once I have sealed the colors.

 

 

Alot of the dullcoat phenomena/trend/whatever it web sharing IMO, it does photo/scan better and easier.

 

 

:D resume normal viewing, opinionated moment over :D

 

:;):

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Alrighty, one thing that I do with my BAttletech and CAV minis is to hit them with a gloss coat (to protect them better) then once that dries, I hit then with a layer of MAtte to take away the shine.

Part of the reason I do that is in order to maintain the illusion of scale. Usually a figure, whether a mech or the figure I am working on atm, will simply not appear that shiny in any type of scale. So, as I said, one coat of gloss, one (sometimes two) coats of matte.

Also, whenever I make scenery, I paint the rocks as well. Not for any particular reason, but simply to maintain an illusion of scale.   :)

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Actually, Dull Cote is darn durable. I've sealed figs with JUST dullcote, dropped them on concrete ( by accident ) and have had them emerge unharmed.

I've found this to be true as well. Dullcote is very durable.

 

That said, I'll admit to coating (or is it coting...?) my figures a number of times during painting. A fair number, actually. OK... A lot.

 

Each time I finish an area (say the face, or the legs, or what-have-you), I spritz the fig. So, by the time I'm finished, the model has been coated (coted) probably at least a dozen times. Then I do a finishing coat (cote -- sick of the joke, yet?   :D  ), allow that to dry for 24 hours, and then do another coat (ok, ok -- I'll quit!)

 

In the end, the figure winds up being quite well protected (ooo... they've encased him in carbonite. He should be quite well protected... If he survived the freezing process.)

 

I have to agree with SmokingWreckage that gloss can ruin a subtle paint job. The shine obscures painstaking details, especially those only a bristle or two in width... say streaks of highlight in an NMM job).

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Actually, Dull Cote is darn durable. I've sealed figs with JUST dullcote, dropped them on concrete ( by accident ) and have had them emerge unharmed.

I've found this to be true as well. Dullcote is very durable.

 

That said, I'll admit to coating (or is it coting...?) my figures a number of times during painting. A fair number, actually. OK... A lot.

 

Each time I finish an area (say the face, or the legs, or what-have-you), I spritz the fig. So, by the time I'm finished, the model has been coated (coted) probably at least a dozen times. Then I do a finishing coat (cote -- sick of the joke, yet?   :D  ), allow that to dry for 24 hours, and then do another coat (ok, ok -- I'll quit!)

 

In the end, the figure winds up being quite well protected (ooo... they've encased him in carbonite. He should be quite well protected... If he survived the freezing process.)

This is exactly what I do.  Many coats adorn a finished product.  I am not saying you could toss one up in the air a whack it with an aluminum bat and the paint wouldn't be mared, but it is pretty tough.

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