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WW2 Colors???


combatpainter
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My first post. Isn't this wonderful!!!

 

Which colors are guys using for Germans, Russians, USA, Brits WW2 Uniforms and armor? For example:The Germans have a uniform that is "field grey" or "green grey." As I am fairly new to the Reaper paint collection, I don't immediately recognize which color would work in this case. Any help?

 

Thanks

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Another suggestion for Vallejo. I also use Andrea paints Field Gray, which is lighter than the Vallejo color. It's good for either highlights on the V shade, or used on its own for late war Feldgrau (which tended to be more variable in shade -- some examples tended to be more gray than green, rather than earlier examples which were more green than gray).

 

For US "khaki" shades, I use Vallejo Iraqi sand mixed with some Olive Drab for the correct shade. Look at some re-enactment photos, and the "khaki" jackets were a light shade of OD rather than a true khaki. YMMV.

 

Damon.

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To answer the question asked

 

I assume this is for something like Flames of War or Reich of the Dead? Hopefully you're not wanting "historical accuracy" ... that's a touchy subject on any forum. ;)

 

Since you asked for "what are guys using" ... I guess I qualify ... so here ya go.

 

Most of these ratios/options were mixed up by Anne Foerster many years ago. I filled in holes for my own preferences. YMMV. Ratios are listed in parts (3:2 means three parts color A and 2 parts color B).

 

US

Helmet = Jungle Moss (9082)

Infantry jacket = Terran Khaki (9122)

Infantry pants = Earth Brown (9127)

Belts/Webbing = 3:2 Khaki Shadow (9121) & Olive Green (9035)

Boots = Ruddy Leather (9109)

 

Vehicles = Jungle Moss (9082)

Vehicle Camo = 2:1 Earth Brown (9029) and Green Ochre (9128)

 

-------------------------------------

 

German (generic)

Helmet = 1:1 Rainy Gray (9038) & Muddy Olive (9034)

Uniform = 3:1 Rainy Gray (9038) & Muddy Olive (9034)

Belts/Webbing/Boots = Pure Black (9037)

 

Generic Vehicle = 2:1 Grey Liner (9065) & Muddy Olive (9034) when I'm feeling picky; Stormy Grey (9188) when I'm not.

 

"Hinterhalttarnung" camoflage

"Dunkelgelb-isch" = 6:1 Palomino Gold & Muddy Olive

"Olivgrün-isch" = Muddy Olive (9034)

"Rotbraun-isch" = Russet Brown (9199)

 

-------------------------------------

 

British (generic)

Helmet = 3:1 Green Ochre (9128) & Muddy Olive (9034)

Uniform = Uniform Brown (9127)

Belts/Webbing = Terran Khaki (9122)

Boots = Pure Black (9037)

 

Vehicles = 3:1 Green Ochre (9128) & Muddy Olive (9034)

Vehicle Camo = Uniform Brown (9127)

 

-------------------------------------

 

Soviet

Helmet = Jungle Moss (9082)

Uniform = Khaki Shadow (9121)

Leather (belts/crossbelts/pouches) = Muddy Brown (9028)

Boots = Pure Black (9037)

 

Vehicles = Jungle Moss (9082) (actually I prefer Pro Paint Troll Flesh (8049) and for the helmets too)

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OK, I see. The colors are mostly there with some tweaking. The green-gray may need to be created. Not rocket science so it shouldn't be too difficult. It is a very basic color for WW2. Coat d Arms has some excellent WW2 colors especially the Field gray (green-gray) In addition toe the Field gray(green gray)Reaper has other colors that can be used as well. They had brown-gray and blue-gray. Reaper has both. Any permutation of an earth tone-green, brown, drab combination would work as factory colors where made with a variety and ever changing available threads. Uniforms needed to be produced. Uniforms were made up of gray-green-brown threading and the thread they had the most of would designate the color that would distinguish the uniform.

 

Thanks for the guidance.

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Another point to consider is that the dye color used to color the cloths involved had little to do with the color of a uniform that had been in the field for even a few days.

 

During WWII, the dyes used were not especially colorfast, so fading was a major issue (often used to make a fairly accurate guess as to who the FNGs were). For example, OD can be anything from a dark OD to a greenish khaki.

 

Second, dye lots can vary significantly in color. This was less of an issue by WWII, but it still happened that two new uniforms had very different colors.

 

Third, Dyes are expensive, so in times of hardship, they tend to be reused more than in good times. This can result in both a color shift (as one color of dye is absorbed faster than another color in the same dye) and a less intense color with later batches of cloth using the same solution.

 

Finally, troops on the line didn't have much opportunity to wash their clothes, so you can take the basic color and add mud and grass stains to taste.

 

Basically, if you're in the right color family, any complaints by your opponents are eminently answerable.

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Another point to consider is that the dye color used to color the cloths involved had little to do with the color of a uniform that had been in the field for even a few days.

 

During WWII, the dyes used were not especially colorfast, so fading was a major issue (often used to make a fairly accurate guess as to who the FNGs were). For example, OD can be anything from a dark OD to a greenish khaki.

 

Second, dye lots can vary significantly in color. This was less of an issue by WWII, but it still happened that two new uniforms had very different colors.

 

Third, Dyes are expensive, so in times of hardship, they tend to be reused more than in good times. This can result in both a color shift (as one color of dye is absorbed faster than another color in the same dye) and a less intense color with later batches of cloth using the same solution.

 

Finally, troops on the line didn't have much opportunity to wash their clothes, so you can take the basic color and add mud and grass stains to taste.

 

Basically, if you're in the right color family, any complaints by your opponents are eminently answerable.

 

Well said! And don't forget the sweat and the general grime, dust, fumes, smoke and just scratches on the cloth from sliding/sitting/sleeping on the ground.

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