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Need a workout and diet plan


Nolatari
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I’m 5’ 4 1/2” and I only weigh 99 lbs. This is normal for my family, but I get sick a LOT and I think it may be tied to both pregnancy losses. I plan to start working out and eating better after I recover from my surgery. I need exercises that are easy on the joints because I have bad knees and sciatica. I don’t have access to a pool either. Does anyone know of any good diet and workout plans I can use? I’ve searched everywhere for a good one but they’re all weight-loss programs. OH, and they need to be cheap to, I do have access to a gym. Thanks guys.

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Well, there is always the Twinkie and Cupcake diet...oh, wait, you want healthy weight gain.

 

I'd say the smartest thing to do would be to talk to your Dr. They're probably going to have a much better idea of what kind of weight you should gain, and the best way to go about it. Check with your health plans, they may also give you access to a dietician or nutritionist who can help, too.

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How do you feel about Beer and Pizza? <_<

 

When my younger brother was a senior is HS he did a lot of track and field with weight training. One of his events was shot-put. He got very lean and muscle-ley. Then he took a scuba class. In scuba courses there is a float test where they put you in a pool for 180 minutes (or maybe it was 90 minutes) and you must remain afloat the entire time to pass. My younger brother discovered (before the big test) he was so lean that he was negatively buoyant when they were determining out how much weight each diver needed on their weight belt. He didn't need any!

 

The scuba course instructor advised, no kidding, beer and pizza.

 

I read somewhere that a baby is an 80,000 to 90,000 calorie project. The same document speculated that there is a physiologically sound reason for human females to involuntarily start gaining weight (that most of them don't want) during the 17-24 years age range (when many are desperate to be slender, thus attractive by current standards) and that the reason is that their bodies are prepping for possible pregnancy (whether the owner likes it or not).

 

80,000 calories is 23 pounds. Of fat. Not muscle. If you had a reserve of half the calories needed that would be about 12 pounds over and above whatever would be a healthy weight for you.

 

So, healthy Nolatari = 110 to 120 lbs. + some reserve for a future pregnancy add another 12 to 20 lbs. So, 124 to 140? :unsure: Starting at 99 lbs I think you ought to focus on finding (as opposed to losing) the next 15 lbs. Worry about exercise in three months.

 

I think dietitians and nutritionists would tell you (at a fair bit of expense) stuff like the following:

 

Recommended Ways to Gain Weight

  • Have meals with the right balance of proteins, carbohydrates, and the right kinds of fat (such as unsaturated and monounsaturated fats, olive oil, canola oil, pistachios, almonds and walnuts). Heinemann suggests the following ratio: 60%-70% carbohydrates, 10%-15% protein, and a small amount of fat.
  • Eat foods higher in calories, vitamins, and minerals, as opposed to higher in fat or sugar.
  • Pack more nutritious calories in each serving. For example, you may add grated cooked eggs to mashed potatoes, ground chicken to soups and gravies, cheese in casseroles, eggs, and soups, and nonfat dried milk in soups, shakes, milk, and mashed potatoes.
  • If you get too full too fast, try having more high-calorie foods or slices of foods as opposed to consuming the whole thing (raisins versus grapes, granola and Grape Nuts versus corn flakes, mango slices versus the whole mango).
  • Limit drinking beverages to a half-hour before and after a meal.
  • Drink mixed juices (apple/berry, peach/orange/banana as opposed to one juice beverages) for a higher calorie intake.
  • Try a small amount of alcohol (4 ounces of wine, 6 ounces of beer, or a half-ounce of liquor with juice) before a meal, as it could stimulate appetite. Moore warns, however, that this recommendation must be cleared with your doctor, especially if you are on any medication. Too much alcohol can be detrimental to health, and could lessen your resolve for eating healthy.
  • With moderation, you may add in good fat sources to meals such as nuts, avocado, olives, and fatty fish (salmon and mackerel).
  • Snack in between meals. Nuts, dried fruits, and yogurt are good options, but it's also important to find nutritious foods that you will enjoy.
  • Have a nutritious snack before bedtime, such as a peanut butter sandwich.

---which I went and snagged from WebMD.com for free. You'll have to go look at the article to see who Moore or Heinenmann are.

 

I'm very sorry you've had such a tough time of it. It sounds to me like a very good plan to take maybe a year, gain some weight, get healthy, maybe focus on school (does your college have gyms & pools??) and then think about starting a family.

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WizOne's suggestions sound pretty good, but you should also talk to your ObGyn or GP about the right diet for your weight gain goals and to get ready for a future pregnancy.

 

As for working out, I am getting lots of mileage out of my stability ball. I found one at a discount store for around $15 and with it I can work just about every muscle group that I normally would work at the gym. If you do a web search you can find ball exercise workouts for everybody from the beginner to the advanced to the expectant to the slightly arthritic. Stability balls have been used by physical therapists for years now because of their versatility and effectiveness.

 

You would need a small one. Look for a 55cm one. If they have a 45cm that would be even better. Start your workout program with it slightly underinflated and add more air as you build strength and improve balance.

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Nolatari I am sorry for your loss. My wife and lost two between the two we have. I would like to point out that if your going to work out as well as gain a littl0e weight that when you work out you will burn part of what ever your intake is. I would aslo like to point out (not trying to be fun or anything like that) the act of making babies burn A LOT of calories. So be aware of that fact too. You might have to really up your intake for a while. I also agree with spike. Talk to your docs. Anyways my best to you and your husband.

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Me and my fiance (not married YET due to insurance issues) aren’t planning on trying again until after we are both out of college. We were both looking forward to having a child old enough to be a flower girl of ring bearer at our wedding in three years, but it doesn’t look like that will happen. Also I thought I would mention that just sitting around and chowing down actually makes me LOSE weight, hence the exercise routine. Really just some cardio and strength building is all I need. Getting my poor muscles back into shape would do wonders for my sciatica and back pain, and being in good shape has been proven to make labor shorter and easier and decrease the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, and preterm labor. So I have PLENTY of time to get the balance of caloric intake and exercise right. ^_^

 

P.S. Exercise helps with depression and anxiety too.

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I’m 5’ 4 1/2” and I only weigh 99 lbs. This is normal for my family, but I get sick a LOT and I think it may be tied to both pregnancy losses. I plan to start working out and eating better after I recover from my surgery. I need exercises that are easy on the joints because I have bad knees and sciatica. I don’t have access to a pool either. Does anyone know of any good diet and workout plans I can use? I’ve searched everywhere for a good one but they’re all weight-loss programs. OH, and they need to be cheap to, I do have access to a gym. Thanks guys.

 

Yea, asking for medical advice on an internet message board, not a good idea.

 

Talk to your Doctor, and get referred to a nutritionist. Anyone else that offers advice is just a pretender.

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Yea, asking for medical advice on an internet message board, not a good idea.

At least asking on this particular one nets responses like "see your doctor". On a lot of the health and diet ones that I've seen, you'll get responses with a lot of advice and absolutely no idea of the credentials behind them.

 

 

My doc just keeps looking at me like I'm stupid...Cant change docs either...That's why I'm here, I'm not looking for a full on diet plan from anyone, just helpful bits to get me in the right direction.

You may not be able to change docs, but that doesn't mean you're out of options. Most health plans - even public or school related ones - have some sort of access to a nutritionist - you may have to dig deep to get that access though. Or, if you're a college student, try through your college.

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