Jump to content

Lessons from the paint bench


Recommended Posts

If priming your miniatures on a piece of newspaper in your carport:

 

A) Make sure you weight the edges of the paper with something if there is even the slightest breeze.

 

B) Make sure the item you weighted the paper with is not a old paint can with spiderwebs, dust, barkdust, or other unidentifiable schmutz on the bottom.   :angry:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 67
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

- When snipping wire, put both the wire and clippers in a plastic bag. The piece you cut off will fall in the bag, saving you from looking for it. Also avoid wire from snapping into your eyes or face.

 

- keep two different rinsing jars of water. Use one to rinse paint/ink off, the other to wet your brush again after you clean it. This ensures you get every last drop of paint off without re-contaminating the brush (especially bad if you are going from metallics to non-metallics) and gives you a ready supply of clean water to mix washes or clean up mistakes.

 

- emery boards make great miniature files. Cheap, disposable, and you can cut them into specific shapes for a specific mini.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And place the tape were you would be cutting so when you cut over it, the other piece doesn't go flying into the other side of the room, never to be seen again.

*Glares at kkoene's work area*

Hope.  Never see it again.  Even AFTER the clean up.

:;):

hehe, after the clean up is when I found my RAFM water elemental!  Also a large pile of small arms and legs (victims of various conversion attempts :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually use five water jars.

 

Two with a bit of brush cleaner added, one for normal paint and one for metallics. Second is plain water for the second rinse, then I even do a third "just to be certain" rinse. Fifth jar is clean water specifically for mixing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) if you want to mix flesh tones, find cheap cosmetics (foundation/base) to check the colors against, this is how I get my best ones.

 

2) if you have a cat, child, or klutz streak keep the little protective sleeves that your fine detail brushes come with, you'll thank yourself eventually.

 

3) don't be afraid to play with your paint, be it on paper, on a pallette, on a mini, whatever.  Some of my favorite techniques have sprung out of "I wonder what would happen if ---------?" moments that I said f-it and just tried it.

 

4) Look for inspiration everywhere. Even your paint pallette (or the back of your hand  :p ) can give you an idea for a gorgeous color scheme.

 

rant.gif

The word can't is a curse word, it even has four letters. You can use glass paints on a mini, you can get cool stuff for your minis anywhere (fabric store, park, wherever), you can drybrush and get it to look good, you can use gold (silver, varigated, etc...) leaf on a mini, etc............... Just because someone else is not able to achive 'x' by way of 'y' does not mean that you are not the person that can.

rant.gif

 

orchid - hoping she doesn't sound like stormie's #2 or Anne's #3 type after that little rant :oh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ha! Funny. I was thinking of adding the exact same thought to this list last night while painting, Paintrix.

 

For those of you who don't seal while painting, let me urge you to do so. This one trick can save you hours of agony and reduce the chance that a mini will end up in the green dip.

 

I seal between each and every portion of a mini (say the face, then the hair, then the legs, etc.) and it has saved me from tons of whoops-es.

 

You see, not only can you hold your miniature more freely, fresh paint is *easily* lifted from a sealed surface with a wet brush. If you make a mistake you can simply "tease" off the mistake, leaving your finished work beneath intact, no matter whether you were basecoating, washing, or drybrushing. Now, while removing whoops-es is also possible on unsealed work, I've actually rubbed through to the metal while trying to fix mistakes, thus ruining the finished paint I was trying to preserve. With sealed paint, you're safe.

 

On the flip side, a word of caution -- Shazbot.

 

Seriously -- You must take care when sealing during painting not to rub areas that have been freshly painted. The paint will lift off easily. So, once you start sealing, you must continue to do so. Fresh paint does not adhere as well to sealer as it does to primer or other unsealed paint, and thus care must be taken (and thus why it is easy to repair mistakes...) However, once sealed, the paint will stay in place and be as hard as nails.

 

Of course, this isn't really a drawback. The more layers of sealer you have on the mini, the better preserved it will be.

 

So, seal your minis as you work. You'll love "teasing" off that whoops. I promise.

 

And that's my story...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Allow me to second the recommendations that one use a cardboard spray booth when priming/sealing to protect against rogue wind gusts.

 

Might I also recommend the use of goggles?

 

Take it from the guy who just got a full spritz of Dullcote in the eyes ten minutes ago...

 

Fortunately, my glasses deflected the majority of the spray, but I got just enough in my eyes to reflect on the sage advice regarding paint booths (BOY!! Does that Dullcote ever STING!!!)

 

Anyone have any recommendations on stripping Dullcote from glass if this Simple Green fails to clear my glasses?....  :oo:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One tip that I swear by is sticking the mini that I am painting onto something (a film case or a piece of dowel) so that I don't need to hold the actual mini whilst painting.

 

When cutting wire, I stick the end into a blob of poster putty (or blu-tak for us Aussies) so that it doesn't fly off into the distance never to be seen again, or even more fun fly into my eye at high speed.

 

And most importantly never finishing painting the last mini in your collection, I have it on good authority that if you do this then seven days later you will die!  :;):

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you keep a bottle of contact lens rewetting drops at your painting station, make sure you keep it well away from your Vallejo dropper bottles, and check to make sure that it is actually contact lens rewetting drops that you are about to put in your eyes.

 

I'm beginning to think that I'd be better off painting without my contacts in.  Every time I start doing detail work, I stop blinking, and my contacts dry out faster than the paint on my brush.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone have any recommendations on stripping Dullcote from glass if this Simple Green fails to clear my glasses?....  :oo:

 

I get a nice layer of Dullcote droplets on my glasses about every other week.  Soak 'em in warm water for a while, and polish hard with a soft cloth.  They do come off, though you might have to repeat it once or twice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...