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Most people find gray metal NMM tougher than yellow metal. Probably because it's harder to get a smooth blend with grays. It's easier on smaller surfaces (belt buckle or necklace rather than sword), probably for a similar reason. So be prepared for having to go back and forth, back and forth tweaking the blend. So I guess my biggest piece of advice is be prepared for it to be a little tedious and take a while at first, and any practice you do with your blending in general will only help improve your NMM.

 

To really get the look of shiny requires a transition from really dark to really bright over a relatively small surface, which is tricky. If you don't have enough of a range between dark and light, it tends to come off looking like stone or another surface. In addition to just having the level of contrast, it helps a lot if you can put really dark shadowed surfaces next to or near the hotspot reflective surfaces. This mini by Derek Schubert is a good example - http://www.reapermini.com/ShowcaseGallery/painted/latest/60025. The whitest highlights on the helmet are next to the black of the eyehole. The brightest reflection on the forward face of the sword is right next to the darkest shadow on the back face.

 

I normally paint starting with the midtone, then shadow and then highlight. For gray based NMM I often find it easier to start near white, paint in the white hotspots and then glaze down the shadows with thin paint. With shiny black I start with black and paint the highlights up, then paint them all back down in reverse order to smooth the blends. So if whatever you use as your normal method of painting doesn't work, don't be afraid to try some different ways of applying the paint.

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I rather like it as is myself. Then again, I'm in the camp that's more concerned with the overall coolness of a mini than getting perfect technique in every little aspect. Kinda like Olympic figure skating where you get one score for technical merit and another score for artistic expression. I'm more impressed by the latter. (To be fair, sometimes good technical skills will help the artisitc expression.)

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ok guys, I have moved my concentration from the curved parts of the armor to the chainmail, which I think is the harder part of the armor.

 

Any kind of blending I use, whether it would be glazing, or blending with a kind of thicker paint, the scales will still look splotchy and they don't look well blended.

 

so, how do you guys think would fix this, if there is anyway to? Any other tips for doing chainmail in NMM would be helpful.

 

thanks

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I don't use NMM so this is strictly from a "painting grey" point of view. What you need to do to get those smooth blends on those scales is REALLY water your highlight paints down. Dip your brush in and then wipe off as much as you can, until it looks like nothing is coming off the brush. When you apply the brush to the mini to do the highlights you will notice that you can see a vague wetness or shine, that is what you want. Apply the paint like this and after a few layers you will start to see the gradual buildup. Just keep moving out toward your highlight and you should get a smooth blend.

 

The issue with small spots like that, at least for me is that when trying to use a little thicker paint it gets gummy and looks tacky.

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ok guys, I have moved my concentration from the curved parts of the armor to the chainmail, which I think is the harder part of the armor.

 

Any kind of blending I use, whether it would be glazing, or blending with a kind of thicker paint, the scales will still look splotchy and they don't look well blended.

 

so, how do you guys think would fix this, if there is anyway to? Any other tips for doing chainmail in NMM would be helpful.

When it comes to painting greys, whites, or other colours that tend to get chalky, Ghool's method of starting with the highlights has been working well for me. I've also had some luck with adding drying retarder to my thinning mix, and with mixing chromatic greys from pigments that are less likely to get chalky in the first place (medium blue and brown), but if you're going up to white it's hard to get away with the latter all the time.

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Looks good I think. I know you said that the camera diminishes the whites, but even so I think you could go a little brighter on the hot spots. There are some bright whites in the background that are brighter than those on the mini.

 

Have you considered a little blue in the midtones of the silver? I like to do that. It gives a honed, sharp feel to the blade. Just as long as a little coolness (in color) doesn't throw off the palette of your piece.

 

Just my opinion. ::D:

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