Jump to content

Tutorial - Basics: Two-Brush Blending


Ghool
 Share

Recommended Posts

Another tutorial released on the Hand Cannon site today!

This one covers some basics about Two-Brush Blending.

 

I don't have a YouTube channel, so I have covered the method with photos and text.

The best way to learn this technique is by observation.

However, I think this should clear up some questions about the method.

 

Enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

So, wait. Even non-toxic acrylic paints can be toxic over time? Yes, this isn't the right thing to ask here I guess, but that was the first thing that caught my eye.

 

EDIT: After reading the article, I have to say that I'm quite excited to try this technique out on a paint hog. I've always wondered how the effect that you got on that model was done, and now that I know, I really want to try it out. Thanks a bunch, your tutorial gave me a wonderful idea to try!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any paint can mess with your nervous system, and digestive system if you ingest enough of it over a long period of time.

Non-toxic just means that if you accidentally ingest some once or twice, there's no need to go to a poison control center.

 

I use flow release, as do a lot of painters, and flow release is extremely toxic.

However, I didn't start using flow release until about two years ago.

 

I still had a massive build-up of toxic chemicals after painting models for 15 years, with GW, and Ral Partha paints, and I licked my brush constantly. Always clean too. But, there's still minute amounts of residue on the bristles. I've even heard of painters licking their brush with paint on it, which makes me cringe.

 

I use P3's now, but I always warn people of licking their brush, as ingesting paint, and additives is not good for you. :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Non-toxic paints": The poison is in the dose. That said, I'm still gonna stay away from cadmium pigments. (Is RMS Flow Improver as toxic as, say, Liquitex flow release? I use that stuff all the time.)

 

Two-brush blending: Let me see if I understand this. Simply put, you lay down the shadow (say) colour, then with a clean wet brush, pull some of the pigment through the blend? As opposed to the way I do glazing, which is to load a brush with the shadow colour, lay the brush on the surface on the "other side" of the blend, and drag most of the pigment across into the shadow. In my mental model, glazing works with very thin paints, so that there's very little pigment deposited at the initial point of contact and most of it gets dragged along (via tension in the medium) with the brush. Two-brush blending, then, would work with thicker paints, as long as there's enough mass to the medium to keep most of the pigment where you first put it and not drag it all along with the brush? Your tutorial implies that you use more matte medium than water to thin your paint for two-brush blending.

 

Also, is there a Reaper equivalent to matte medium? 09215 Anti-Shine Additive is listed as "matte additive" on the thumbnail, but doesn't sound quite right. I can't find P3 matte medium around here for the life of me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Non-toxic paints": The poison is in the dose. That said, I'm still gonna stay away from cadmium pigments. (Is RMS Flow Improver as toxic as, say, Liquitex flow release? I use that stuff all the time.)

 

Two-brush blending: Let me see if I understand this. Simply put, you lay down the shadow (say) colour, then with a clean wet brush, pull some of the pigment through the blend? As opposed to the way I do glazing, which is to load a brush with the shadow colour, lay the brush on the surface on the "other side" of the blend, and drag most of the pigment across into the shadow. In my mental model, glazing works with very thin paints, so that there's very little pigment deposited at the initial point of contact and most of it gets dragged along (via tension in the medium) with the brush. Two-brush blending, then, would work with thicker paints, as long as there's enough mass to the medium to keep most of the pigment where you first put it and not drag it all along with the brush? Your tutorial implies that you use more matte medium than water to thin your paint for two-brush blending.

 

Also, is there a Reaper equivalent to matte medium? 09215 Anti-Shine Additive is listed as "matte additive" on the thumbnail, but doesn't sound quite right. I can't find P3 matte medium around here for the life of me.

 

That's 100% correct.

P3 Mixing medium really isn't matte, as it leaves a bit of shine.

Matte medium can be found in any art supply store. I use Liquitex myself, and I buy a big 1L bottle of it for $15 at Michael's.

It shouldn't be very hard to find.

 

And, yes, all flow release is toxic. Extremely so, and should never be ingested in any concentration or amount.

The paint polymers are not what's toxic either; it's the pigments.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also, is there a Reaper equivalent to matte medium? 09215 Anti-Shine Additive is listed as "matte additive" on the thumbnail, but doesn't sound quite right. I can't find P3 matte medium around here for the life of me.

Anti-shine Additive is full of a matting agent you add to glossy paint to reduce the gloss. You have to be very careful with it to avoid adding too much and making the paint look chalky. I believe you could add it to gloss acrylic medium to turn it into matte medium, though I've never tried that.

 

Dumb question, but...what in the world is "flow release"?

It is probably good for other purposes, but the main one for me is that it keeps glazes from forming tide marks around the edges as they dry. Or at least it makes them less likely to form. Note that Reaper MSP paints have flow improver (same thing as flow release) in them already and generally don't need any more added.

 

Reaper sells a flow improver product, but I've always used Liquitex. Since you have to dilute it approx. 20:1 water to flow aid when you use it, it is hard to use up even a small bottle. I've heard of some people using other stuff like dish liquid and dishwasher rinse agent for the same purpose. I've never tried them, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...Also, is there a Reaper equivalent to matte medium? 09215 Anti-Shine Additive is listed as "matte additive" on the thumbnail, but doesn't sound quite right. I can't find P3 matte medium around here for the life of me.

Try RMS Brush-On Sealer. If you use it as a paint additive instead of as a sealer, it works just like matte medium. Strange but true... I think this was mentioned in a CasketWorks article once upon a time. May even be the reason Reaper doesn't sell a matte medium. Last time I checked, anyhow.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Kang

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...