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Tornado for Dinner


EdPugh
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When I left DFW on Monday morning it was starting to rain + there were some pretty dark grey clouds approaching & we flew into them. It was pretty rough going through it but after that it was pretty smooth sailing. Thou leaving Denver we had some bumps as well (worse was the stewardess & her loud voice on the intercom saying services will be suspended till it gets smoother :angry: :angry:).

 

Glad everyone is safe, nasty nasty weather this year. Right now it's high winds & its gonna rain soon but nothing like what is happening in the midwest. Our area doesn't get tornadoes. More or less microbursts & such.

 

RM

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If you are in a car - get out of it.

 

The new advice, and what we got on the radio today, was to stay in your car and get down below the level of your windows.

 

The only reason to leave your car is for a safer structure like a building.

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FEMA what to do in the event of a Tornado

 

Excerpted here (Note, following the link it's a two column table, hence the odd grammatical artifacts below):

 

If you are in: A structure (e.g. residence, small building, school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, high-rise building)

Then: Go to a pre-designated shelter area such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar, or the lowest building level. If there is no basement, go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. Get under a sturdy table and use your arms to protect your head and neck. Do not open windows.

 

If you are in: A vehicle, trailer, or mobile home

Then: Get out immediately and go to the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or a storm shelter. Mobile homes, even if tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes.

 

If you are in: The outside with no shelter

Then: Lie flat in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands. Be aware of the potential for flooding. Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location. Never try to outrun a tornado in urban or congested areas in a car or truck. Instead, leave the vehicle immediately for safe shelter. Watch out for flying debris. Flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries.

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I can't see the pics. :( My stupid computer tells me I'm not allowed.

 

It was pretty scary for me when that thing was coming through. I was in my hotel room trying to make order out of the chaos I had created before my O-dark-thirty flight home when the sirens started going off and the weather channel was saying go to your safe room. The desk clerk kept saying no no don't worry, you're very safe but it was hard to believe when standing under the awning in front of the lobby listening to the sirens and looking at the black swirling sky.

 

I think there was about five of us out there, two of them had taken refuge during their drive home and had their own stories of near misses. They said that there had been a touch down at some high school less than a mile away!

 

Crap. I thought I had left tornadoes behind when I moved to Colorado.

 

Jen

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I don't seem to have permission to view the pictures, either. And I'd like to make copies of them, since the one I took wasn't very good. Anyone know what I need to do to see the pictures?

 

I think the weirdest thing is that no one really did panic. And it didn't seem that windy where we were. I would have expected a lot of general wind in vicinities that close to a tornado. It's always super windy where we are whenever they have a tornado watch on.

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Whatever Ed, I'd be impressed if you took the picture from inside the tornado.

 

But in all seriousness, take care everyone. The only things we worry about out here is the cataclysmic earthquake geologists keep promising.

 

 

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One of the stories today on NPR is entitled How to Survive a Tornado.

 

The advice echoes the FEMA information that Michael posted plus adds a few details.

 

Ron

 

Ah yes, one fact I forgot; Some homebuilders these days are known for NOT appropriately attaching the roof to the walls, some do not appropriately attach the house to the foundation.

 

In the former instance, the roof lifts off. In the latter, the house shifts on the foundation.

 

Rgds,

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Ah yes, one fact I forgot; Some homebuilders these days are known for NOT appropriately attaching the roof to the walls, some do not appropriately attach the house to the foundation.

 

In the former instance, the roof lifts off. In the latter, the house shifts on the foundation.

 

Rgds,

 

:blink:

 

For real?

 

How disturbing...

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Ah yes, one fact I forgot; Some homebuilders these days are known for NOT appropriately attaching the roof to the walls, some do not appropriately attach the house to the foundation.

 

In the former instance, the roof lifts off. In the latter, the house shifts on the foundation.

 

Rgds,

 

:blink:

 

For real?

 

How disturbing...

Yes, for real. Partly depends on local regulations and partly depends on the site supervisor.

 

My old house, which I visited every day as it was being built, I'm pretty sure that the frame was bolted down to the foundation and there were hurricane straps attached to the roof frame. Partly because the city of Stafford required the straps and bolting, partly because I and my girlfriend at the time did the "bad cop, worse cop" routine with frequent visits.

 

My current house, with the same builder that I bought 6 or so years after it was built, I'm sure that there aren't hurricane straps (or few of them), and I wouldn't place bets how how well bolted down it is. Same builder (company) and only 10-15 miles from my last house, but we're in an unincorporated part of Missouri City (no pesky city regulations) and I'm sure that the previous owners weren't watching the site crew like a hawk (based on other issues).

 

Yes, we should have done more research and I should have pushed harder when my wife fell in love with the trees in the back.

 

Ron

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