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Question on Wet Palettes


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I asked before on a different thread - does the penny composition matter? Pennies from 1982 and older are all copper. Pennies from 1983 and newer are a zinc core with a thin copper plated shell. If the plating is worn or scratched off, the zinc can corrode. Does this matter in the wet palette?

 

I also have a P3 wet palette that I haven't used yet. It uses grey packing foam as it's sponge - the same grey foam used to pack and cushion miniatures. Anyone tried one of these yet?

 

I also have those little plastic jars. I keep a couple around for odd things like "blood" and washes. If they have a good seal, the contents will last years.

 

~M

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I asked before on a different thread - does the penny composition matter? Pennies from 1982 and older are all copper. Pennies from 1983 and newer are a zinc core with a thin copper plated shell. If the plating is worn or scratched off, the zinc can corrode. Does this matter in the wet palette?

 

Although I can't say for sure, I doubt it matters. I just checked my penny. 2003. :poke: It's got a little bit of crud on it, but nothing too major and it still does the job!

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Make sure the bottom of the palette is flat. If it is bowed even a little bit you will be using a slightly curved surface which will cause the thin paint to run. I have one like this and I'm still trying to figure out how to get the bottom to unwarp.

 

If it's the small plastic Masterson one, I successfully used a heat gun to soften the bottom and then placed it on a flat heat resistant surface and a flat heavy weight on it until it cooled down and saved it's new shape. Funny thing is that the palette was initially flat, but warped over time.

 

Regards,

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Sure thing! I initially tried holding it to shape and putting cold water on it to "fix" it, but found that was more difficult than finding something to hold it down and allow for a slow cool down. I was still able to touch the plastic, so it was not a high temperature (didn't want to be breathing fumes).

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What kind of wet palette are you using, and what kind of paper are you using?

 

I'm using one of these:

 

http://www.dickblick.com/products/masterson-handy-palette/

 

Instead of using the paper that comes with it, I use ordinary baker's parchment. Never really had much issue with paint running everywhere, and a 3:1 paint:water ratio is considerably thicker than what I paint with on average.

 

I use this one as well and absolutely LOVE it! I use the paper that comes with it (Heck, you can even rinse and re-use! Gah! I LOVE THIS THING!) and my paints didn't run. Also, another plus, I didn't paint for a week and my paints were STILL wet when I came back to my project! Just had to thin em out a little bit... but the sponge was still quite moist!

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Sorry to double post :mellow: I was wondering, in discussing the Masterson Handy Palette how many uses people got out of each piece of paper? I'm on my 2nd use on the first paper I have used from them, and am absolutely loving it. Sadly, I have a little hole in it (I mix paints A LOT) and I guess it wore a little hole, which isn't a big deal to me. I don't think many on this thread use this palette (though I definitely recommend it!) but for those who do, how many uses per piece do you think you get?? :) Thanks!

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The pennies basically work as an anode, to draw the mold away from the sponge. It is not technically an anode, but it it the best analogy I can think of. It is the same basic principle we used in my last job, to keep the steel pipelines from getting rusted.

 

 

Actually, Copper is toxic it simply kills bacteria and fungi. And no, solid pre-82 pennies are not required. At the volume of liquid involved, a plated penny should give you more than enough Cu to do the job.

 

And yes, Cu can kill people, you just need a lot more than a few pennys worth AND you would need to get it inside to live cells as most of the ones it would contact on the outside are already dead.

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I re-use my masterson's paper until it breaks. I can't say that I measure "uses" as once the paint gets a little bit funky, I rinse it off and go again. So, many many uses!

 

:;):

 

Fantastic to know!!! I haven't had issues with paint getting weird yet, but I'm definitely loving this rinse & reuse bit A LOT!

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