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Need advice from the experts


chipchuck
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Okay, so I picked up the Dryad Queen that Derek sculpted, and I'm really digging it.

 

The problem is, I'm going to have to greenstuff the area where her wings meet her body, but if I do that I don't think I can get to her back to paint.

 

So what do ya'll do in that situation where if you put the model completely together you can't get at some areas (but those areas are technically visable) but if you don't put it together there will be gaps?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Chip

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In that case I typically use a special brush to paint in the "impossible" to reach areas. I've got a few liner brushes with really long bristles that keep a good amount of paint on their belly and allow me to reach in a get to those obscured or blocked areas.

 

The bristles themselves are about an inch long, kolinskies, very nice for poking into those deeply recessed or otherwise out of reach areas.

 

If the area is really finicky to get into even with the liners, I'll use oil paint for shading instead of trying technical layering style. What that means, is that I'll still paint the obscured area, but I'll do the shading work in oil paint as the longer drying time, viscosity and overall handling is better suited for that kind of thing if you want to pull of decent looking shading and blending.

 

The technique for that includes a bit of spot gloss varnishing and thinning of oil paints to allow for a "pin washing" technique, which I've adopted from a military modelers bag of tricks.

 

The end result is an area that has acceptably detailed and shaded appearance, even if it's a tricky area to reach.

 

But that's my own, very personal and specific approach, which I've adopted over time since I encounter this situation quite alot where I need a bunch of tight detail packed into a ridiculously hard to reach spot, yet I still need to paint it to the same level as everything else, not sure how much use this post will be to you but it may help get some creative ideas.

 

 

(if you pursue the brushes, they're called riggers or liners depending, look like those pinstriping brushes but with shorter bristles)

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I dry-fit the pieces, and try to do any build-up or putty work that allows me to keep them separate. Then prime and basecoat, then glue the wings on. This way I have a good base layer down (nothing worse than white spots in an area you can't reach) and any remaining putty/fill work is minimal (and usually in a spot I can reach).

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Right, I assumed that you were meaning that the putty work would also be visible. I take several approaches.

 

Technique 1: If the pieces can be painted separately, then delicately assembled and the join is NOT a problem, I paint 'em separately.

Technique 2: If I cannot get at the place with a looong brush (due to some sort of angle, then I use an angled brush I have. With thousands of minis painted, I've only used this brush two or three times.

Technique 3: The shadow thing I referenced. After observing ALOT of awesome paint jobs, I've found that folks that are way better than me extended the shadow so the problem area was less of a focus. It still looked natural, but the amount of effort, time, etc needed to paint the blend was reduced since that part of the mini is not the intended focal point.

Technique 4: What darkstar referenced is great when it's straight or almost straight (for me). Just get a brush with longer bristles and carefully execute the painting. You may find that you'll need to paint "backwards". I really just mean at angles you don't normally paint from.

 

Bottom line, painting things in hard to reach places is more difficult not only because it's hard to reach, but because it's hard to get the light at the right angle so you can see what you are doing while maneuvering the brush!

 

So, any of the suggestions helping?

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Hmm, If it was me, I would paint them separately and leave the area to join unpainted. I would also seal the two separately but leave the area I was joining unsealed, and then pin with green stuff and glue when ready. But it depends on what you are using it for and what you want to do paintwise. Good luck! ::):

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Another thing you can try that I don't see mentioned yet is one I was doing for my winged Finari conversion (which still isn't done yet). Do all your pinning of the wings and test-fit them into the body, and get that part all figured out before you primer. Then, either wet the body down with water or even vaseline, place the wings in, and do your putty work; if you do it quick water or spit should work, if you think it'll take you a bit then use vaseline. That way, you can get all the sculpting done up front. Wash the body off, prime and paint all pieces separate, then assemble with a dab o'glue and greenstuff. You might have to touch up a few small spots that way, but otherwise it should work fine.

 

The other method I do for spots that are hard to reach is the ol' flood with Brown Liner while I'm lining. If it's going to be in shadow anyway, a bit of extra shadow won't hurt ::D:.

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