Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Elouchard

Forgeworld Dreadnought

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

 

Taking a break from the old Grenadier box sets for a display-level commission, I got a chance to work on a Forgeworld World Eaters Dreadnought. This was a bit of an experiment in painting almost entirely with inks, either straight from the bottle or mixed with some opaque Reaper and Vallejo paints. There were a few main ink colors used throughout the mini, Liquitex brand Burnt Umber, Raw Umber, Napthol Crimson, and Turquoise dark hue. Those formed the bulk of the color. How they were applied varied a bit between areas of the figure.

 

To start, the model was primed black, then given a zenith coat of desert yellow, then white. I probably should have held the model on a wire for priming as the blowback from the ground negated most of the effect, but it still worked okay in the end.

 

The red plates were painted with a mix of napthol crimson and some Vallejo red-orange, in a thin layer, adding some more crimson as I made the gradients. After that dried a bit I build up the gradient further using turquoise mixed in with the crimson to make a dark red, and pure turquoise to make a semi-black. This ink is very dark, and not anything like the normal turquoise paint one gets from GW or Reaper, which would have white binder (talc) to make it brighter. The smoothness of the blends was done with many rapid strokes with different mixtures of ink. Liquitex ink dries a bit slower than hobby acrylic paint but once dry will not lift up, so it is very nice for glazes and layering. I cannot say the same for some other inks. It is also much flatter than old GW ink and some W&N ink I have tried. Edge highlights were done with some Reaper Golden Highlight mixed with Vallejo GC Hot-Orange paint. The scratches and dings were done with thinned black with the edges highlighted with the golden/orange mix. One thing about an ink-paint mix is that it is very smooth and flows well off the brush even when there is little loaded on the tip, so it is nice when trying to paint fine lines. Adding some extender did not help with blending at all though, as it made the previously painted ink start to lift up.

 

The gold trim was given a base coat of gold paint (golden fluid acrylic), then washed with a mixture of 50/50 burnt umber and raw umber ink, thickened with a mix of matte medium/water. The raw umber is the key here, as it gives the gold a warm yellowish-brown midtone. Once this was all dry, I used a mixture of Vallejo GC polished gold and silver to add the highlights, and thin layers of burnt umber ink to make the shadows. Edge highlights were plain silver.

 

The superstructure was given a base coat of bronze (Liquitex metallic ink actually). When dry I gave it a thick wash of turquoise/burnt umber ink mix, with matte medium. This gives it the dirty blueish-brown hue like very old bronze, but not with a patina, as that would mean the metal was corroded and might freeze up (not good for a mech). Some additional highlights were added with thinned bronze/silver, with edge highlights in pure silver.

 

cables were turquoise+black, highlighted with thinned white added. The optical sensors were turquoise and white, to give them more or a pop. The world motif was given a wash of turquoise and pthalo green ink, with a touch of white used to pick out the details.

 

The base was pretty simple, done with mostly raw umber and white for the GW Skullz. The sand was given washes of many different colors for subtle tints.

 

That's pretty much it. Here is the pic combo.

 

img4e07ea562b0b6.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:blink: I would love to see a tutorial on how the inks were applied.

 

VERY IMPRESSIVE. A great paintjob on a beautiful model. Doesn't get much better than that!

 

Pez:zombie:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:blink: I would love to see a tutorial on how the inks were applied.

 

VERY IMPRESSIVE. A great paintjob on a beautiful model. Doesn't get much better than that!

 

Pez:zombie:

 

In short, the inks for the red were treated like thin paint, painted in quick strokes. They key is to make them quick enough that there is a slight amount of wet blending. Each stroke dries quickly though, so there is not much time for that, and but one could call it "feathering" the edges of the previous stroke. Each stroke should build up additional color and even out inconsistencies with the previous strokes. It is probably best seen in a video. The ink washes are painted on also, since the mix with the matte medium is fairly thick. One important factor is to rotated the model so the ink does not run off the sides and pools right where you want it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best dread I've seen in a while. I love the turquoise against red and the way all the elements "pop". Also, thanks for the description of your techniques.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

VERY nice deep reds, pleasing to the eye for sure. Can you spare a moment to give your thoughts on the Golden Fluid Acrylics since you used that brand for the gold base here? (I've got a paint obsession and many times have considered buying some of that brand to play with but keep forgetting when I'm at dickblick to actually get any). Also that cracked turquoise effect on the front there is awesome, well done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

VERY nice deep reds, pleasing to the eye for sure. Can you spare a moment to give your thoughts on the Golden Fluid Acrylics since you used that brand for the gold base here? (I've got a paint obsession and many times have considered buying some of that brand to play with but keep forgetting when I'm at dickblick to actually get any). Also that cracked turquoise effect on the front there is awesome, well done.

 

Golden fluid acrylics are, to me, like thick inks. They have very high pigment content and just enough acrylic medium to make them thicker while not losing their color saturation. The metallic is pretty good. The other colors are nice for glazing but are tricky for blending. Reds are very difficult to use in blending as they tend to dry slowly and lift up with successive layers. Mixing them with some Reaper paint helps in them drying and binding. Overall, they are a nice choice due to their smoothness and color saturation, but are not very tough and are tricky to blend in thin layers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

E: You never fail to impress me.

 

The pigments really seem to be the source of such coloring. Your explanation made 100% sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I should clarify is that the washes are not just slopped on. They are applied thick and allowed to settle, but then moved around with the brush to make sure they pool in the right places. It is not the same as dipping or just applying the wash, and is much more careful. Most of the time it all pools in the right place if the right amount wash mix is used. This wash "editing" can only be done right after applying it though, as once it starts to dry it will leave rings and other marks if you play around with it. After drying completely, I would go over the areas again that need additional shading before starting with the metal highlights (bronze+silver).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About the primer, it was black to start, but the zenith priming of desert yellow and white makes it more tan and white in the end. The basic techniques would probably work the same but only if there was a base coat of opaque paint to completely cover what would be shaded and washed later.

 

An interesting point about the Liquitex inks is that they mix well with paint that is normally a bit chalky and end up smoothing it out. Pure ink makes the lacquered appearance of the armor - like a hard shell, but mixing in some paint does not result in a chalky layer. This way one can make what is essentially a custom shade of hobby paint, taking a regular light shade like bone, light olive or white that can have a chalky texture and changing the color with inks. This works well with the different umbers and sienna to make very smooth browns, tans, leathers, etc. A good one is to mix raw sienna with white or off-white to make an effective bone. Adding tiny amounts of blue or green can make new and useful shades that are like vallejo "deck tan" or those other useful off-white colors. The same process may work with inks Reaper makes, or their glaze colors, so I should try it with them also. I just like Liquitex inks because the colors are so vivid and they are so workable, and dry fairly flat also.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...