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Some questions about master series paints


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Hi guys and gals I'm new here and am going to start using reaper master series but have some questions. My first question is what are liners. I keep reading they are for lining but I don't know what that is so could you guys please tell me. My second question is I noticed rms doesn't have many washes so can I make the paints into washes and if I can how would I do that. Would I just add a lot of flow improver? My last two questions are what are the clear colors(I'm guessing they're like glazes) and how are the metalics in this range. Thank you for all responses and sorry for the long post

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Liners can be used to add a shadow between items like if you have armor on bare skin. You use a liner to differentiate between the two. But there is nothing that is said that you can't use the liner as regular paint as well.

 

Reaper doesn't sell washes but the paint can be thinned with just water to make a wash. You can add flow improver but water works just as well.

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Hello GWS!

 

First question can be answered in the sticky thread in this forum, "Paint product descriptions". Dargrin is wrong about washes, as we do sell washes; however, you can turn any paint color into a wash with water and some flow improver. Clear colors are covered in the same Product Description link above, and I'm not sure what you're after regarding the metallics, so you might have to do some digging on that one, or let us know better what you're trying to find out. As always, using the Advanced Search option on this forum can find answers to tons of questions, since not only have questions like yours been answered before, but forums are innately fantastic at putting those answers at your fingertips ::D:.

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ATM hit it on the head. What I thonk you're also looking for is some opinion. Reaper Master Series are generally an outstanding line. I've become less of a fan of the metallics in the line because they loose the metal luster with any thinning much like GW metallics. I'm moving towards Vallejo metallics. The three washes they have are not bad but I like GW's better because the GW washes are a little more saturated. What I mean is the RMS black wash is more grey, for example. Don't get me wrong RMS is a good paint line, but there are some things I wish it were better at. Metallics and washes are what I wish they were better at.

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I'm going to guess that the items you wish could be better could be better only with more toxic ingredients, which Reaper will not use in the product. I'm pretty sure that's the case with the metallics, at any rate. And I'm cool with that, it gives the consumer options depending on what they want the product for.

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IDK Wren. The RMS washes perform the same as GW washes I'm just not a fan of the colors, but I will say their different colors have given me options. So on the washes it is color mostly. As for the Metallics both Privateer and Vallejo metallics perform better than the RMS or GW metallics. They keep their luster instead of turning into glorified yellow or grey paint. OTOH I can do some decent NMM now because my RMS metallics forced my hand. ::):

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I wasn't disagreeing about the metallics, just passing along the info that Reaper uses the metallic ingredients they do because of lack of toxicity. So people concerned about that or that buy the paints for kids should consider Reaper. Adults who will use a product carefully who are more concerned about the end result have GW and Vallejo and such as options for their needs. Everyone wins. :->

 

I honestly don't know either way on the washes, it just occurred as a possibility that it could be a similar cause.

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I wasn't disagreeing about the metallics, just passing along the info that Reaper uses the metallic ingredients they do because of lack of toxicity. So people concerned about that or that buy the paints for kids should consider Reaper. Adults who will use a product carefully who are more concerned about the end result have GW and Vallejo and such as options for their needs. Everyone wins. :->

Follow-up on the metallics: I've started using VMC Air metallics for their smaller flake size. Is flake size a direct contributor to toxicity? Do fine-flake metallics like VMC Air and Alclad II need a more toxic medium to support the smaller flakes? I'm given to understand that fine particulates are Bad News if they get airborne, but the usual countermeasure (for finishing resin, for example) is wet-sanding. If there's a toxicity issue with my VMC Air metallics, I'd like to know as much about it as possible. ::):

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Follow-up on the metallics: I've started using VMC Air metallics for their smaller flake size. Is flake size a direct contributor to toxicity? Do fine-flake metallics like VMC Air and Alclad II need a more toxic medium to support the smaller flakes? I'm given to understand that fine particulates are Bad News if they get airborne, but the usual countermeasure (for finishing resin, for example) is wet-sanding. If there's a toxicity issue with my VMC Air metallics, I'd like to know as much about it as possible. ::):

 

Well, there's definitely the factor of fine particulates flying through the air. That's not necessarily in itself a source of toxicity (unless you inhale toxic metal flakes.) But that can be addressed by wearing an appropriate OSHA mask. (I always use one when I airbrush, no matter how toxic the paint - you will inhale some of the spray and even acrylics will coat your throat and lungs...)

 

The medium/binder itself may be toxic, but less likely if it's a bottled paint. (Spray-painted metallics usually have nasty mediums.) The medium for most Vallejo metallics (not the pearl ones) is alcohol, not in itself totally toxic, but again since I don't have an MSDS for Vallejo paints YMMV... :poke:

 

It's probably the metal pigments being used. Metals have varying degrees of toxicity as paint pigments, from the lowest (aluminum, iron) to the highest (cadmium, cobalt.) Fine artists have to be very careful when using reds, yellows and blues as a result - metal makes luscious colors in those paints, but also highly toxic ones...

 

Traditionally "non-toxic" metallic paints have to use mica or aluminum flakes. Those give you more of a "pearl" effect. These are likely what you'll find in RMS paints.

 

Judging by what I've heard and read of Vallejo metallic paints, they use real metallic pigments. Since they say their colors will oxidize unless varnished I would guess these include bronze, copper, and alloys of the same, in addition to aluminum. Gives you a great effect - not so hot when ingested and/or absorbed through the skin...

 

Check out this list of artist pigment toxicity: http://www.tucsonaz....rds/paint1.html

 

Look at the end of the list and you'll see the relative toxicities of metal flakes:

 

ID Pigment Color Pigment Name Other Names Description Ingestion Haz Inhalation Haz Skin Contact Haz Other Hazards

 

121 METALLIC Aluminum Powder

Pigment Metal 1 Aluminum

 

No significant hazards No significant hazards No significant hazards

122 Metallic Bronze Powder Copper bronze powder

Pigment Metal 2 80-90% copper, 1% zinc, iron

Moderately toxic Moderately toxic by ingestion, especially if corroded by exposure to moisture

123 Metallic Copper Alloy

Pigment Metal 2 Copper, zinc, aluminum, tin

Moderately toxic Moderately toxic by ingestion, especially if corroded by exposure to moisture

124 Metallic Gold Bronze Powders

Green gold bronze; pale gold bronze; rich gold bronze; Pigment Green 10 68-92% copper, 6-31% zinc, 0.25-10% aluminum

Moderately toxic Moderately toxic by ingestion, especially if corroded by exposure to moisture

(Sorry, the table formatting wouldn't paste over properly...)

 

As with fine art paints, though, a little prevention prevents pounds of cure... Wash your hands after handling true metallic pigments to prevent accidental ingestion later. NEVER LICK YOUR BRUSHES!! Don't wash your brush, palette, or rinse water in a sink used for dishes or food preparation. (Did I mention never to lick your brushes?!? :poke:)

 

Later,

Laszlo

http://hot-lead.org

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