Jump to content

Horizon Lines???!?!??!#$?


Digital M@
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 16
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

The horizon line in drawing and painting is that point in which everything dissappears. For example if you were standing outside and looked to the west as the sun was setting, the Sun goes down, and you watch as it dissappears over the HORIZON. That is what is meant by a Horizon line. And neat thing about horizons that one learns in art class is that they are always going to be eye level to the observer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In mini painting, DM, the horizon line is the line in Sky-Earth Non-Metallic Metal (SE-NMM) in which the sky is dilineated by the brightest highlight and the earth by the darkest shadow. On my kneepads, it's the dark brown line (which admittedly should have been higher) and the white line above it, marking in the reflection where the sky meets the earth. On the hammer on the shield, it is the darkest gray line (running horizontally across the hammer) and the white line above it (again, the demarkation of the earth and sky or the reflection of the horizon).

 

Here's a good article explaining this: NMM on CMON

 

Here's another: Fantasy Art Resource Project

 

Also, look around CMON for more examples and articles on NMM.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DM, drawing classes, if they deal at all with perspective and the construction of proper perspective, will teach you all you need to know about the horizon line and its implications. There are many good "how to draw" type books that also deal with perspective (and by association, the horizon line). The "perspective for comic book artists" are especially fun.

 

Anyways, drawing courses can definitely help even we, who deal with colors and 3D :) If you have some time, I'd dive in and give it a shot.

 

Thanks

AWhang

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, drawing courses will do a lot to teach you basics of shading, highlighting, and perspective. These three aspects can easily be transferred into painting anything. You've got to learn all the basics before you can move up to the more complex. Even with my past self-teaching of art, I'd still have to start with the basics in order to get to the more advanced stuff.

 

Go ahead and take those drawing courses. They couldn't hurt. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If that's the way you feel about your ability now, then you definately need to take a beginning drawing course. Get the basics and you'll see how much you can apply it to painting minis.

 

And anyone can draw if they have the right knowledge and practice. I'm not saying you'll be the next Monet, but the technical basics anyone can get.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...