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Dish soap to reduce surface tension


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10 hours ago, Gadgetman! said:

@rfarmer124 Did you notice the AGE of the original posts?  

This is a topic that should have stayed buried, for some very good reasons.  

 

Once upon a time, probably in the stone age or slightly before that, Pledge floor wax was supposedly pretty much 'clear medium', and could be used to thin paints. (The ingredients have changed many times since then, so don't even think about it). One enterprising minotaur bought a set of paints from Reaper, a set of empty bottles and proceeded to dump half the contents of each bottle of the set over in empty bottles, and top both up with Pledge in the mistaken belief that he would then have TWO sets of paint but at a lower cost, and could sell off one of them. It went badly, and he blamed Reaper.   

We don't want that kind of minotaur droppings...   

 

We don't use dish soap because we don't always know what's in it and how it will react  long-term with our paints.    

 

As for your alcohol tip, that probably works OK on inks, but paints are not inks. What does it do to the binder in the paint? 

5% ?

That would be 1 drop of IPA to 20 drops of paint.  

Unless I'm basecoating a large mini, that's several times more than what I'll put on my palette. 

Also, never suggest using IPA or other alcohol without mentioning good ventilation, gloves and breathing mask in the same post. There are people out there who won't take precautions unless they are hammered in.

 

That said, WELCOME!

 

Pop by in the off-topic subforum for your welcome basket filled with Stroopwaffels and insanity.  

 

Alcohol is very brand dependant. Tamiya acrylics are typically thinned with isopropyl instead of water. Adding it to Reaper paints the same way would likely be a bad idea though.

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About the only time I've ever heard of adding dishsoap in hobbies is for applying decals (water kind).It'll allow you to "hover" the decal in place before final spotting. Granted this is also can be accomplished with Decal set from Microscale or Vallejo.

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2 hours ago, haldir said:

About the only time I've ever heard of adding dishsoap in hobbies is for applying decals (water kind).It'll allow you to "hover" the decal in place before final spotting. Granted this is also can be accomplished with Decal set from Microscale or Vallejo.

 

I've seen a number of recommendations to add a tiny bit to a large glass of water for rinsing bushes and thinning paint. It's also not uncommon in the airbrushing world to thin paint with water that has a touch of dish soap in it. I think the important thing with additives is that that you shouldn't add them to your paint bottles. Mix them on your palette, especially before you've tested them. This doesn't just apply to the weird household additives people come up with, don't expect additives from different brands to play nice with your paint even if they are for "acrylic" paint. There is a lot of variation between some brands on what goes into their acrylic paint.

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Back in the 90's before GW came up with it's newer generation of washes the 'Eavy Metal team would routinely recommend adding "washing up liquid", aka dish soap, to washes to make them flow properly. You would only use a very tiny bit to break up surface tension and prevent the wash from beading/pooling funny. Dish soap used to be a thing, now a days it's far easier just buy an additive and go to town.

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Hi, I have a solution to this, I've been doing it for years comment the 1st time can share with the public.

 

Well I'm about to share with you collar for not only help the flow of your paint it will thicken it and improve the quality of your paint all of the same time.

 You can take the oil by itself and it will turn your Egg shell into a semi gloss  Paint.

 

And I will also show you 2 different products that you can get that will thicken improve the quality of your pain and that work so well you can turn a primer into a semi gloss paint.

 

My YouTube Channel,;  Easy to tips and tricks ect, is a how to Channel where I show you how to do this.   Here's the video link:

https://youtu.be/czIsCp_tRLc

 

 Easy to use tips and tricks ect Channel:

 https://youtube.com/c/Easytotipsandtricksetcetc

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I would think that, if using dishwashing detergent as a flow aid in washes, that terrible hippy eco stuff would be best as it doesn't contain all the foaming agents they add to high-end brands to fool people into thinking that their expensive detergent works for longer than the cheap crappy stuff. When it comes to acting as a surfactant and breaking surface tension, detergent is detergent as far as I know.

 

However, I should note that this is purely theoretical: I haven't actually done any testing.

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3 hours ago, MojoBob said:

I would think that, if using dishwashing detergent as a flow aid in washes, that terrible hippy eco stuff would be best as it doesn't contain all the foaming agents they add to high-end brands to fool people into thinking that their expensive detergent works for longer than the cheap crappy stuff. When it comes to acting as a surfactant and breaking surface tension, detergent is detergent as far as I know.

 

However, I should note that this is purely theoretical: I haven't actually done any testing.

 

If you are using soap the amount is so small that bubbles shouldn't really be a thing. If they are you probably used too much. Really though, if you're going to do it just buy a bottle of flow aid. It's $5-10 and will last the rest of your life and you won't need to worry about whether any of the additives in the soap will react in funny ways with the paint

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11 hours ago, cmorse said:

 

If you are using soap the amount is so small that bubbles shouldn't really be a thing. If they are you probably used too much. Really though, if you're going to do it just buy a bottle of flow aid. It's $5-10 and will last the rest of your life and you won't need to worry about whether any of the additives in the soap will react in funny ways with the paint

Exactly. It's a one time investment for something that is properly formulated for paints.

 

My own bottle of "acrylic flow release" is from Golden, is 118ml, which I dilute 5:1 to 10:1 and transfer to a Reaper dropper bottle. I don't even need to use full drops. I barely wet the paint with it and get desirable results.

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12 hours ago, cmorse said:

a bottle of flow aid. It's $5-10 and will last the rest of your life

 

Eh, I'd say that's a Your Mileage Might Vary statement. My bottle of Liquitex, bought about 10ish years ago, has turned yellowish on me. Stored properly and everything. Granted, I hardly use it, so I haven't noticed if it's not performing properly.

 

I will point that any dish detergent you buy is concentrated, and it only takes a little bit of it to work ("little bit" mean stick a toothpick tip in it, and stir that into 50mL of water, possibly more, and you'll be set). You won't see bubbles with so little in there.

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