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Bones n Primer


DixonGrfx
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Past work with painting PVC...hold the spray can a few inches further back than you normally do.

 

The volatile organics which interact with the Bones evaporate really fast. A few more inches of travel time generally is enough when painting up PVC for different crafty things...should work with Bones as well.

 

When I got my first ones last spring, I tried out the rattle cans I had on hand at the time (Tamiya and Testors) and they worked fine, though they are made for priming plastic models so likely have less of the suspect chemical. Both are enamels though and both dried just fine (about the same time it takes to dry on metal or resin). The ones which remain tacky will dry (there isn't anything that won't really) it just interacts with the vinyl and takes longer for everything to outgas. Heat and or vacuum should help it along if you have a tacky one. Otherwise I don't recall ever seeing a plastic remain tacky for more than a month.

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So I've tested them with primer and without. I do get slightly better results with primer... but I am astonished at the results I got WITHOUT the primer. This is some good stuff.

 

And I have yet to have any problems with cracking or losing paint, primer or no primer.

I'm just curious as to what your priming the bones line with? Is anyone using a plastic prep to clean the minis from oils etc?

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Past work with painting PVC...hold the spray can a few inches further back than you normally do.

 

The volatile organics which interact with the Bones evaporate really fast. A few more inches of travel time generally is enough when painting up PVC for different crafty things...should work with Bones as well.

 

When I got my first ones last spring, I tried out the rattle cans I had on hand at the time (Tamiya and Testors) and they worked fine, though they are made for priming plastic models so likely have less of the suspect chemical. Both are enamels though and both dried just fine (about the same time it takes to dry on metal or resin). The ones which remain tacky will dry (there isn't anything that won't really) it just interacts with the vinyl and takes longer for everything to outgas. Heat and or vacuum should help it along if you have a tacky one. Otherwise I don't recall ever seeing a plastic remain tacky for more than a month.

Lacquers and enamels aren't as flexible as an acrylic in my experience. I'm wondering if using a Tamiya or Testor primer may end up cracking on a flexible surface like the bones mini.

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My priming experiments were all a disaster. I primed using the following:

 

1. Testors Enamel Flat Black: this verified that there is some sort of vinyl compound in these minis. Dried normally, but after few days was still tacky, and had turned glossy to boot.

2. Wal-mart Valu-cheapo Flat White: my preferred primer these days (dries faster than Krylon), not as tacky, but still with the same issues as #1

3. Krlyon Red-brown Primer: see #1, just as bad.

 

I'm painting one now without primer, and yes, it can be done, but the paint has to go on thicker than normal. I don't like this. For my next experiment, I'm going to prime with Tamiya Flat White acrylic through my airbrush, and see how that works...

 

Damon.

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I painted the purple worm with no primer and it's held up great during play and regular handling, no paint at all has come off of it.

 

Same here - the worm painted up great without primer for me, but I tried that with the Minotaur with poor results. Stripped it, cleaned it and tried again but still the paint did not stick very well - in particular on the tail and the more flexible parts - just flaked right off. I have stripped and now trying a primer of Dullcoat from Testors to see what happens.

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In case people missed the link earlier in the thread, I did a test of a few different primers (and Dullcote) here -http://www.reapermin...urability-test/

 

I need to update that with new pictures, as the minis have now been through an additional con's worth of abuse at PAX. To sum up:

 

If I'm working on a figure that doesn't have greenstuff or non-Bones material basing, I will be happy to go no primer in the future. If something does have other materials on it, I'll probably go with brush on, though possibly Duplicolor in some circumstances. I would never, under any circumstances, use Dullcote as a primer on Bones.

 

Wordier version:

 

1. No primer = excellent durability. It paints well, but does require an unthinned coat of paint for the first coat on the figure. (Think of it as a primer coat and just paint on all white or black or whatever if you need to? Also if worried about filling in detail, again think of it as about the same thickness being added to the surface as primer.)

 

2. Reaper brush on primer = excellent durability. No changes needed to how you would usually paint.

 

3. Duplicolor Sandable auto spray primer = good to excellent durability. Slight tackiness noted in the primer, but did not seem to affect the paint (or how I used the paint) or the durability. However, I will be careful to test any other brands I might want to use, as I can foresee possibilities of primer that never really cures or damages the figure.

 

4. Dullcote used as primer = terrible durability. The figure prepared this way has experienced significant chipping, and once a chip starts the paint continues to flake off in a wider and wider area around the initial chip. The damage is much worse now that it's gone through a second con's worth of handling and mishandling. I would never recommend this method!

 

EDIT TO ADD: I haven't had a chance to take pictures yet, but I just did a close visual inspection of the four minis. #2 (Reaper brush on) has suffered the least damage. #1 and #3 both have a few more chips, but nothing too bad. All four were out for handling and display in the paint & take sign-up area at PAX. They were dropped on the table repeatedly to demonstrate durability, and thrown in a bag with some unpainted ones at the end of each day for storage. #1 was probably handled the most.

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A follow-up: I just got a can of Army Painter white primer from The War Store. I did some testing on a Bones base and can confirm that A) it is acrylic and B) it works perfectly on Bones with zero tackiness after fifteen minutes. The spray was extremely fine and the price was decent. It is what I will be using from here on out with my Bones (and given the quality of the results, probably with my metal pieces as well.)

 

So, known results:

 

Krylon white primer: Signifcant tackiness

Army Painter white primer: no issues

 

Anyone want to add any experiences with specific products?

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I am going to try and participate in the group bones ogre painting threat. I purchased one bones as an experiment till the KS's are sent out.'

 

This is a copy and paste from the other thread.

 

Ok since priming the mini and letting it sit for 4 hours, it still feels sticky with the primer. I also primed 2 metal minis and they were fine ~ 10 min after priming.

Pressing a finger nail into a small section it moves around like nail polish that hasn't completely set, and pressing a finger tip on to it leaves a lovely finger print. Currently this has me very disappointed, and im not sure if i want to continue to paint it or try and strip the primer off.

 

Primer is the Citadel spray - that I've used for years. Pro- no problem on metal minis. Con- not bones friendly.

 

When the KS minis come in, i will attempt to paint one with out primer.

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I hve always primed with white acrylic artists' paint thinned with matte medium, and I have never had any problems with it.

 

(Just because of some confusion I've seen elsewhere, "artists' paint" is not equivalent to "craft paint." The former is high-pigment loaded, archival, and made with quality materials. The latter is hobby stuff of dubious quality.)

 

I used it on the Bones figure I am working on, and it is working just fine.

 

I suspect the solvents used in many spray-on primers are reacting badly with the soft plastic of the Bones figures.

 

If it's a serious problem, this ought to be made more public before people get their shipments of Bones next spring. Possibly in the form of a paper insert: "Important notice: Due to the special nature of the Bones material, DO NOT prime with solvent-based enamels such as etc. etc."

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http://www.warpuppy....oduct_info.html anybody primed with this? And could any of our resident artists tell me if they'd expect gesso to be flexible enough to be a primer for Bones?

 

Acrylic gesso is plenty flexible.

 

<optional art materials history TMI>

Part of the confusion may stem from acrylic "gesso" not actually being gesso in the classical sense.

 

A gesso painting ground was historically a mix of slaked lime plaster and rabbitskin glue applied to a rigid surface such as a wood panel or carving before painting. It was absorbent and sturdy, but cracked at the slightest movement and thus was unsuitable for flexible surfaces.

 

Oil paint grounds were developed for the more flexible and lighter weight canvas which became popular as a painting surface in the Renaissance and later.

 

Modern acrylic "gesso" is even more flexible than oil grounds and is really closer to an oil ground than to classical gesso.

</optional art materials history TMI>

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