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Evil Empire has Evil Customer Service - Surprised?


Bruunwald
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Wow, even more reason to not buy GW... stuff.


I'm a little confused.


The source of your confusion is understandable. I was confused too, until I read the other links. It would be like Disney trying to trademark Barsoom. Sure, they have legal rights to their movie, but everything else is public domain. The fact that GW is trying to lay claim to an idea, since space marines are in so many different works, and that they're virtually unopposed, is very surprising.

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So, Evil Empire is making a clearly fraudulent trademarkt claim (there's prior art aplenty - don't you wish Heinlein had called the book "Space Marines" rather than "Starship Trooper"?), par for the course. Amazon caving, that's a little surprising, but I guess it's easier to hose a small seller than to actually check on whether EE's claim can possibly be legit.

 

What I don't understand is why EFF didn't actually offer to take this to court. This is the kind of "it's so evidently a fraudulent claim we shouldn't even have to be here" case they absolutely need to pursue and win if they ever want to force any kind of positive change to the legal abomination that is US patent and copyright law...

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You know what is good, regardless of how you feel about this particular move by GW. In times past if this had happened to a publisher, it probably would have flown under most people's radar. But with the power of the interwebz and The Google, it's now easier and easier for this information to be disseminated. Awareness is, in my opinion, the first step to stopping crap like this from happening.

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So, Evil Empire is making a clearly fraudulent trademarkt claim (there's prior art aplenty - don't you wish Heinlein had called the book "Space Marines" rather than "Starship Trooper"?), par for the course. Amazon caving, that's a little surprising, but I guess it's easier to hose a small seller than to actually check on whether EE's claim can possibly be legit.

 

What I don't understand is why EFF didn't actually offer to take this to court. This is the kind of "it's so evidently a fraudulent claim we shouldn't even have to be here" case they absolutely need to pursue and win if they ever want to force any kind of positive change to the legal abomination that is US patent and copyright law...

Money, five lawyers were interviewed and all were willing to take the case. Starting at $2,000 and going up from there. No lawyer has been willing to take this one pro-bono at this point.

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So, Evil Empire is making a clearly fraudulent trademarkt claim (there's prior art aplenty - don't you wish Heinlein had called the book "Space Marines" rather than "Starship Trooper"?), par for the course. Amazon caving, that's a little surprising, but I guess it's easier to hose a small seller than to actually check on whether EE's claim can possibly be legit.

 

What I don't understand is why EFF didn't actually offer to take this to court. This is the kind of "it's so evidently a fraudulent claim we shouldn't even have to be here" case they absolutely need to pursue and win if they ever want to force any kind of positive change to the legal abomination that is US patent and copyright law...

Money, five lawyers were interviewed and all were willing to take the case. Starting at $2,000 and going up from there. No lawyer has been willing to take this one pro-bono at this point.

 

Which is a shame, seeing how it's more or less a slam dunk that should lead to damages. OTOH, it might take a while to get the money out - and even lawyers have to eat. =/

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Here's the story Heisler mentioned earlier. Over in the literary world right now there's a furore because GW, claiming it completely owns the trademark of the term "space marine," got Amazon to actually yank an author's book from sales. The first link is the author's blog. They couldn't have picked a sweeter, more decent target if they tried.http://haikujaguar.livejournal.com/1208235.html?view=24685739#t24685739https://twitter.com/search/realtime?q=Games+Workshop&src=typdhttp://www.techdirt.com/articles/20130206/06521321890/games-workshop-proves-it-would-rather-bully-authors-than-be-culture-participant.shtml?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

I was beginning to wonder when this would happen, condidering the popularity of eReaders.

I'm a little confused*. The book that was shut down was an ebook, but the term "space marine" has been used in science fiction for most of the last century. It preexists in a lot of physical books and stories.

 

Unless you are referring to how vulnerable this book was to being yoinked because it was an ebook dependent on Amazon for its very existence. Convince Amazon and you kill the book.

 

 

 

*Then again, it is way early in the morning.

 

 

Yes, In a sense. I more commenting more towards the actual circumstances surrounding the legal, or extralegal (depending on one's point of view) actions of GW. In GW's ever increasing mission to improve their bottom line, they will go after the weakest fish in the pond so to speak. What better way to set a legal precedent than to persue legal action against an individual who can not adequeaely defend herself. From a lawyering standpoint it's a nobrainer- If the lawyer is tainted by the corrupting influence of GW's Chaos™. Personally, I'd recommend their Inquisition™ Purge™ the Legal Department in toto... :devil:

Edited by Seer of the Pitt
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Had no idea that DC and Marvel owned the trademark on superhero and variations thereof either.... that's just mental

Oh yeah, they squabbled over it in the 'sixties, then came to an agreement that they would jointly share it and come down like a ton of wrath on anyone else who dared use the term. It's why there are so many awkward euphemisms for "super hero" in roleplaying games.

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If it makes you guys feel any better, there's a blog that's turned on their "Popehat Signal" to look for pro-bono lawyers for Ms. Hogarth: http://www.popehat.com/2013/02/06/the-popehat-signal-help-an-author-against-a-bogus-trademark-claim/

 

IIRC, they've had success in the past. (I don't follow the blog, but every once in awhile I hear about them turning on the Popehat Signal for cases like this.)

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So, Evil Empire is making a clearly fraudulent trademarkt claim (there's prior art aplenty - don't you wish Heinlein had called the book "Space Marines" rather than "Starship Trooper"?), par for the course. Amazon caving, that's a little surprising, but I guess it's easier to hose a small seller than to actually check on whether EE's claim can possibly be legit.

 

What I don't understand is why EFF didn't actually offer to take this to court. This is the kind of "it's so evidently a fraudulent claim we shouldn't even have to be here" case they absolutely need to pursue and win if they ever want to force any kind of positive change to the legal abomination that is US patent and copyright law...

Money, five lawyers were interviewed and all were willing to take the case. Starting at $2,000 and going up from there. No lawyer has been willing to take this one pro-bono at this point.

 

The EFF has staff attorneys. They sure must have a lot of clear-cut cases on her desk if this one isn't worth taking on...

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So, Evil Empire is making a clearly fraudulent trademarkt claim (there's prior art aplenty - don't you wish Heinlein had called the book "Space Marines" rather than "Starship Trooper"?), par for the course. Amazon caving, that's a little surprising, but I guess it's easier to hose a small seller than to actually check on whether EE's claim can possibly be legit.

 

What I don't understand is why EFF didn't actually offer to take this to court. This is the kind of "it's so evidently a fraudulent claim we shouldn't even have to be here" case they absolutely need to pursue and win if they ever want to force any kind of positive change to the legal abomination that is US patent and copyright law...

Money, five lawyers were interviewed and all were willing to take the case. Starting at $2,000 and going up from there. No lawyer has been willing to take this one pro-bono at this point.

 

 

 

The EFF has staff attorneys. They sure must have a lot of clear-cut cases on her desk if this one isn't worth taking on...

 

 

 

Would you be willing to take on Sauron and all four chaos gods all by yourself for free?

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