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Reaperbryan
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Ah. I see now. In the case of metals, I only have recent experience with tin alloy miniatures (from GW and Reaper)

 

though, my uncle used to have some pewter minis, and I don't recall breaking or messing those up from dropping them.

 

It was a long time ago, so perhaps I do not remember it very clearly.

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What I REALLY want to know is.....what came after Cthulu? What would have been the 4 million goal? Alas, the answer may elude us for eternity....<sobs>

 

Listen to the Nerdherders interview. At one point, adding more mini's to the Vampire and Undertaker levels wasn't cost-effective (or impressive), so they eventually dropped it, so no mounted units. Some stretch goals will be saved for a future KS, if they have one. Really, the stretch goals weren't set in stone.

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The out-of-the-blue metal-from-metal breakage has NEVER happened to me, so I can't possibly agree with you on that point.

 

I'm not talking about stuff just snapping off for no reason, but I've had, for example, a sword get bent that in the process of unbending it, it's snapped right off. Likewise I;ve dropped figures and have them land on, say, am arm that isn;t superglued on, and have the arm break off anyway.

 

Dropping the frost wyrm? Absolutely, to prove that it is the superglue, and not the metal itself, that is fragile.

 

It doesn't matter if it was the glue or the metal failing in this case. A broken mini is still broken. The fact that metal minis require multiple brittle superglue bonds to assemble makes the model as a whole inherently more fragile.

Meanwhile not only are bones minis meant to be single-part with no bonding required, but when you do glue to them (as with a conversion) because the underlying material is more flexible it puts less stress on the joint and is going to be much less prone to breakage.

 

The model as a whole is much more fragile when it's a metal mini than a plastic one. That's just a fact. Metal deforms, metal breaks, superglue breaks, bones plastic flexes instead of breaking or deforming.

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Ah. I see now. In the case of metals, I only have recent experience with tin alloy miniatures.

 

though, my uncle used to have some pewter minis, and I don't recall breaking or messing those up from dropping them.

 

It was a long time ago, so perhaps I do not remember it very clearly.

 

 

How often you encounter fragility also depends on what types of miniatures you commonly work with. Take these two recently unblistered ladies from my stash:

 

This is a Reaper, and this is about normal warpage for a Reaper mini. It's not too bad, and the sword blade is pretty thick without being ridiculous. So that's a sturdy bit of metal.

 

.warpone.jpg

 

 

Now if we compare that to this recent cast from Iron Wind off an old Ral Partha mold . . . you can spot the difference immediately. That's going to be trouble to fix, and it's going to be ridiculously weak when it's finally straight.

 

 

 

.warptwo.jpg

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I see your point, but that has STILL never happened to me. I chalk it up to luck.

 

EDIT: And no, Galahad, outside forces like the glue you use for assembly do not affect inherent qualities. Else they wouldn't be inherent :P

 

Actually, we're talking about the MODEL as a whole, not just the base material. A multipart metal MODEL requires brittle superglue bonds. There's no other way to assemble one. Therefore superglue breakage is INHERENT to the nature of a metal MODEL. A metal model is basically made of metal, superglue and paint. If any of those materials are fragile then the entire model is therefore fragile.

 

Meanwhile, if you wanna get all pedantic about the structural properties of metal vs bones plastic then there's a very easy way to test that as well.

 

Get a metal Templar Knight and a Bones one. Paint them both. Now grab the sword and tweak it back and forth until one of them breaks. It's going to be the metal one. Spike it onto a concrete floor and see which one has more deformation and paint chipping. Again, it;ll be the metal one. The metal one breaks easier than the bones one, it is therefore more fragile.

 

Even a solid metal mini with no superglue bonds is going to be more fragile than a bones plastic mini. You just can;t get around it.

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A multipart metal MODEL requires brittle superglue bonds. There's no other way to assemble one. Therefore superglue breakage is INHERENT to the nature of a metal MODEL.

 

Bit of an aside -- I've been having good luck with epoxy putty to hold my metal model joints. I pin the joint, rough up the mating surfaces, and mix up some green stuff, 50/50, in place of glue. As I press the joint the putty squeezes out. Remove the excess with a hobby knife and in most cases I've just done my gap filling as well (just smooth the surface with a clay shaper or wet finger). The cured green stuff has some flex to it, and things have held up well so far.

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I'm surprised you are having that kind of success with green stuff, its not really an adhesive the same way regular epoxy would be. I try not to use superglue, I prefer to pin and use epoxy for a stronger joint. I wouldn't say superglue is brittle as such as its just not going to create as strong a joint as epoxy will. However, superglue combined with accelerator does make for a very brittle joint speeding up the catalyst action reduces the effectiveness of the glue.

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I agree about the accelerated super glue. I spray accelerant on glue that's gotten where it shouldn't specifically so I can easily chip it up. Green stuff does, however, stick to *anything* when its fresh. From PSI --

 

"Kneadatite Blue/Yellow ("Green Stuff") is a two-part epoxy/polyamide sealant/adhesive for interior and exterior maintenance and repair. It has excellent adhesion to stone, ceramic, metal, wood and many plastics, including vinyl."

 

http://www.polymericsystems.com/epoxies-adhesives/epoxy-putty-tapes/kneadatite-blue-yellow.htm

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A combination of green stuff and superglue works pretty well too. Just gotta be careful not to use too much of either, it;s best for bigger joins. GS sticks great initially but after its cured it's pretty much a mechanical connection, relying on the parts being properly roughed up to give it something to grip, but it has some flex which makes it more durable. If you add a drop of superglue on either side of the GS it gives the epoxy a better hold while keeping the flex.

 

In all cases, pinning is essential, Basic metal on metal is just asking to break off.

 

Which is why I HATE METAL MINIS in general. just assembling them requires modification. You have to drill and pin if you want any kind of hold. Modifying them requires even more work, lots of sawing and filing.

 

@#!& that noise. Plastic is easier sturdier and cheaper.

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Which is why I HATE METAL MINIS in general

 

 

::o: ::o: ::o: !!!!!!!!!

 

C'mere, I gotta wash yer mouth out with soap.

 

Soap!? You?!

 

I'm disappointed, buglips, I thought you'd have washed his mouth out with your stanky shoes...

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Which is why I HATE METAL MINIS in general

 

 

::o: ::o: ::o: !!!!!!!!!

 

C'mere, I gotta wash yer mouth out with soap.

 

Soap!? You?!

 

I'm disappointed, buglips, I thought you'd have washed his mouth out with your stanky shoes...

 

 

Only on the second offense. And you don't wanna know what happens on a third.

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