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Green stuff and other epoxies -- health hazards & precautions

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Here are MIT's safety procedures for dealing with epoxies:

 

http://www.psfc.mit.edu/esh/epoxy.html

 

Note that epoxy is a skin irritant, especially the hardener part.

 

I'm curious to hear how people deal with this. Does anybody sculpt with protective gloves on?

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I wouldnt worry too much. While it can be an irritant, keep in mind that Green Stuff (or at least the Kneadatite brand version) as far as I can tell is a solid-formulation polyamide epoxy: solid and polyamide both being mentioned in the "hazard assessment" discussion section as the lowest risk categories.

 

If you are worried or have a history of sensitivity or asthma problems, then Id wear some cheap latex gloves and work in a ventilated area. And a dust mask is never a bad idea when sanding anything. But at the amounts dealt with working with minis, and the relative risk of green stuff compared to other epoxies, youre very unlikely to run into real problems, IMO. Unless you try to eat it... ...

 

Keep in mind that those instructions are made to cover all the way to the other end of the spectrum dealing with large quantities of liquid amine epoxies with chemical fillers.

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No gloves, unless I am doing something where fingerprints would be an issue (only needed this once so far). I've never had a problem with skin irritation from the GS.

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I don't have any sensitivities, asthma, or other such health concerns but I also don't handle green stuff every day. I work with it maybe once or twice per week. I use vaseline when I work with it, which helps keep it from adhering to my skin.

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The one I will wear gloves with is Milliput as that is a bit more than a skin irritant although the gloves come off after I have mixed it and made the main applications. I primarily use Milliput for terrain though.

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The one I will wear gloves with is Milliput as that is a bit more than a skin irritant although the gloves come off after I have mixed it and made the main applications. I primarily use Milliput for terrain though.

 

I know this is a bit off topic and so I apologize, but I'm new to the whole painting and basing scene and recently purchased Milliput. Is Milliput pretty much the same stuff as the Green Stuff in terms of what you can do with it? Or should I purchase the Green Stuff to add small modifications to my minis?

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Green stuff is more elastic and adhesive than Milliput, so it's better for detail work - You can push it around on the miniature more - And for the application of very small amounts or thin layers.

 

Milliput is more 'clay-like' in texture, not as adhesive, and sets completely rigid (unlike GS) It's also considerably stronger once set, so it's better for bulk work, regular/hard-edged/mechanical forms, and anything you plan to carve to shape at a later date. One final thing about Milliput is that while it's insoluble once cured, it's water-miscible when soft, and as well as using water to snooth it you can make it into a 'slip' to run into gaps and the like.

 

Hope some of this helps.

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I don't wear gloves with green stuff, though I probably should start. I've got sensitive skin, and after working with green stuff my thumbs and forefingers are tender for the rest of the day. Not painful, just tender as if I abraded them. I'll definitely have to wear gloves if I start working with milliput.

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That sort of reaction is worrying. I know some people seem more sensitive to the volatiles you get from curing epoxies than usual, so yes, gloves seem like a good idea.

 

It's ironic really; I've never had any problems with modelling putties - While fluorecent tubes put out enough UV to make my eczma flare up if I spend too long under them.

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I use nitrile gloves from the pharmacy (latex allergy, ugh). They're bright purple, and when I bring them to workshops the kids love them.

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I use nitrile gloves from the pharmacy (latex allergy, ugh). They're bright purple, and when I bring them to workshops the kids love them.

how do you knead the putty green without it sticking to the gloves? I'm worried that petroleum jelly would get kneaded in with the putty if I coated the fingers of my gloves with it...

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