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Now putting on the lighter color. Here's where the problems start.

My first problem was that I just had trouble controlling the paint at all. The instructions say to thin it down to the consistency of a near-wash. Okay, fine, I get that. But the problem is, when I do that, now it wants to ACT like a wash, and go all over the place. How do you control watery paint, and keep it where you put it?

Too much "paint" if your thinning your paint per the instructions you want a small amount on the brush so don't just dunk your brush in, I tend to wipe my brush 3 to 4 times on the edge until I get the right amount of paint.

The second problem was that I had a hard time seeing where to leave the shadows. Almost everything I did looked wrong. But I figured maybe the highlight step would make it look better.

 

I ran into this issue, the female figures are Much harder to highlight and shade as they don't have the defined muscle lines that the male figures do, best thing I can tell you is shade in the crevices and low spots and highlight on the muscles.

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I have found I really really don't like the new techniques so far. I didn't end up taking many pics and she doesn't look terrible but the wizard girl didn't look as nice as I would hope. I had to resort to some of the drybrush technique to salvage a little of it.

 

 

It's been a long time since I was wrestling with this kit for the first time (mine was still the pro paint version), but I do remember that layering suuuuucked. I despised it quite a lot. I didn't really figure out what I was supposed to be doing until later, after much practice and more minis, but when it clicked I understood what the instructions meant.

 

This is also why when I talk about the kits, I talk about how they're best viewed as practice exercises to try new things. Without worrying too much about how it comes out (i.e. being perfect) you can focus on trying to figure out what the weird new approach is supposed to be. This way you might also try out stuff you think you'll never really use (it's a bit like learning some math that way).

 

It's an introduction to stuff that can pay off if you decide to really push your limits, and gets you experimenting with all the weird stuff you can make paint do to do different things. Some people, like Cashwiley, after going through the kits may never drybrush again. And some come out at the end and decide for time saving and their army that drybrushing will be used more often than layering. And some folks like me blend the two together.

 

If you have Kit 4, that will be your next one and it continues the lesson in layering. So it's extra practice, but it also (IMO, though my instructions are old) makes a bit more sense. Skintones, especially on muscle groups, are the best way to learn layering. If you get through 4 and feel confident, move on to five if you have it. If not, I'd recommend stripping Laurana and Tsuko and giving them a re-do (you should find them a lot easier this time around).

 

It's a complicated thing to explain and show, and it leaves you with a lot to figure out on your own, but when it sinks in (probably faster than it did for me, even gamma rays won't penetrate my skull) you'll probably say: "Ohhh . . . well, this ain't so hard at all!"

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This is also why when I talk about the kits, I talk about how they're best viewed as practice exercises to try new things. Without worrying too much about how it comes out (i.e. being perfect) you can focus on trying to figure out what the weird new approach is supposed to be.

LTPK2 was really interesting for me.

 

When I did the first kit, I was coming into it from a position where I didn't think it was really possible to do anything at all. Even looking at the WIP thread for that, I thought it was all a bunch of ringers who'd painted hundreds of minis already and were just slumming so they could show off, like the kid who takes Spanish 101 in college after four years in high school. So when I actually did the first kit, and found out that I could paint a totally credible tabletop mini, I was flabbergasted and amazed. And I knew that obviously people can do things I couldn't do -- I can see pictures as well as anyone -- but I just assumed those people were magic, and that I was doing basically about as good as any actual human could do, modulo a few mistakes and missteps here and here.

 

And then I do LTPK2, and it pulls back the veil on the magic, and it's revealed as simply being hard work, and careful observation, and all that. And now I'm doing some of the stuff that I've seen those "magic" people do, except that it turns out that I suck at it. Suddenly I've gone from "I'm WAY better than those D&D prepaints" to "I'm nowhere NEAR as good as people who are actually skilled at these techniques."

 

Which, honestly, I think is pedagogically brilliant. First give people a feeling of mastery, and get people who don't think they can do anything at all to feel that they can do ANYTHING AT ALL. And then, after they're feeling a little cocky, show them that they've barely started to learn what they're doing, and there's a whole world of techniques sitting out there that they're going to have to work at to get good at.

 

I can definitely see where LTPK2 would upset some people, and make them want to retreat to the much easier wash-and-drybrush skills that they've already gotten good at, but personally I find it kind of fascinating and challenging to take these new techniques that I'm still struggling with a bit and try to apply them "in the wild." After doing LTPK2, the next figure I've picked out is one of the Kickstarter Bones wizards with a lot of folds in his robe, which'd give totally mediocre results with a wash-and-drybrush method, but has a lot of potential if I can do the highlights and shadow well.

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Some of them like Martin 'That Guy' really are magic. Somewhere previously we determined that it distinctly possible he actually bleeds out of production paint. But yes, L2PK 1 is that first try. It is there to get you hooked when you realise 'hey I can paint a mini and it looks pretty good' L2PK 2 is to keep you coming back for more. Personally though, I don't think people should jump from 2 on to 4 and 5 right away. I did, but I've been applying paint to figures for years, and I found 4 HARD. I think I was successful, but it was far more work. Not a bad thing that, but had I slowed down and painted a few more figures using the basics from 1 and 2 I think it would have come out far better. mkozlows has the right of it. After doing 2, pic a few figures that use the techniques from the first two, and use them, practice them. Look back at the instructions for them when you do and see if you can find some insite there into what you should try do to achieve the look you want with these. get comfortable with the basics, then pick up the next step. Lather rinse repeat. Or don't. Maybe you will find you are perfectly happy with the first methods and never want to go beyond, and you know what. That's perfectly alright to. As long as you are happy with the results and enjoy the process.

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Sh is turning out pretty pale. The problem I ran into was my brushes didn't seem to want to take a point well so when I tried to do the lining it turned out really bad. I also think I would rather start with the midtone base and then do the shadows and highlights rather than the shadow, midtone, highlight technique of the sorceress. I also changed some stuff up with her. I will post her when I take a picture but I changed the hair, she's a brunette now like my wife. I think the hair looks good and the eyes look pretty decent. I am trying to get to be a better painter but my real desire is to be good enough to put a decent looking mini on the game table.

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I don't think people should jump from 2 on to 4 and 5 right away.

I agree. Take the lessons from each kit and work a few minis to get the techniques comfortably under your belt. Then, when you're feeling cocky, crack the next kit and start all over again.

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So,

 

I just got Kit 2 yesterday and started on it straight away.

I primed with Tamiya light grey

 

Basecoat:

 

Front

20130516173635.jpg

Back
20130516173647.jpg

I forgot to take photos of the shadowing, so here they are with shadowing, highlights and eyes:

 

Front

 

20130516205537.jpg

Back

 

20130516205547.jpg

 

I screwed up one eye, so I redid it:

 

20130516205826.jpg

I had real problems with the shadow as it ran every where as soon as I put the brush point on the mini.

I redid the basecoat and tried the shadows again with only 1 drop of water and still it's tough as you can see.

 

Looking at it from about 1-2 feet, it looks good though.

 

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+1 for pip avatar

 

You've got a good start. Learning the way paint thins and flows off the brush is part of the education the kits provide. Other than just putting in the time practicing and playing around, my only comment would be to use a bit less highlight, so there's more of the base coat visible between the shadow and highlight.

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While waiting for the barrow rats base to dry figured I'd clean up and prime the figures from kit #2..Tho I can see from the photo I missed some mold lines under the staff on the left will have to clean that up.But they're primed and ready to go

 

 

ltpk2+primed.jpg

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My work in progress on Laurana, and using the instructions more as a rough guide already... My girl is going to be a druid type with stars on her blue dress, a green streak in her dark brown hair and if I'm brave enough a green glow on the scroll. I've learned so far I prefer using a #4 filbert, progressing through a #2 and then a #5/0 and mixing/blending most of my colors thinned with water, matte medium and flow aid (which still dry a little too quickly.) I"m going to paint from the inside out and save the face for last.

After priming with my mix a couple days ago, we had a painting party tonight. I started with putting all the base colors on so I could feel good about being fast ^_^

The skin tone I made was too thinned and after two translucent coats I went to unthinned color for the skin (the other colors were fine thinned however.) Next carefully shaded the skin. Was rather happy with the blends, then I managed to highlight too big and bright. :unsure: Decided it must be a happy accident and started the shading over. This shading is okay at the table, but looks very rough close up and in good light, lol.
The dress I'm quite proud of; I did something similar years ago on a photoshop colored commission for a friend. Lots of different mixes of three blues with each other, brown, green, and red. Stars were light blue and white, white and white with silver. Then I went over with brighter blues again and again touched the shading and highlighting.
Next step will be pouches, boots and hair. and probably will fuss with the skin more. Thanks in advance for any advice/compliments :poke:

post-12096-0-78751400-1368940018.jpg post-12096-0-19007400-1368940019.jpg

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I decided to work on Laurana for the LTPK #2 first

I mixed the basecoat color and applied for step one last night and then applied the midtone for step two this morning

 

laurana+skinbasecoated.jpg

.
I might not have thinned the midtone paint enough ..or maybe worked with to much paint on the brush ..seems to stark between the two but Blending Layers is something I've never figured out well at all so this is good practice. I do think perhaps that a wet palette isn't the best idea for layering paint since it needs to be so thin..its hard to not have it run out into a big thin puddle and separate..so for the rest of the layering I'm gonna work out of a traditional palette

laurana+skin+midtone.jpg

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