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My Laurana is done!

 

And before I get any grief: Yes I know this is gimicky, and that we're supposed to be developing our painting skills, and so on. But I gave fair warning a few posts back that I was wanting to play around with "special effects"... and if Reaper won't release LTPK6, then I'll just have to find ways of entertaining myself.

 

lauranafront.jpglauranaside.jpglauranaback.jpg

 

That's a piece of cotton ball in case anyone was wondering.

 

As far as going off script goes... well, other than the obvious I didn't really grasp how her top was supposed to work. Some folks have painted it as a bikini, and the LTPK instructions had it as a sort of body suit... I liked the idea that she had a small gemstone necklace on, and then decided she had a matching undershirt on beneath the bodysuit. Possibly made of asbestos.

 

One thing I wish I'd done differently was found a way to get the scroll lettering dark enough that it didn't get lost in the glow effect (and of course the pictures make it look worse than it is). Someone with a very steady hand could probably manage it, but since I had to live with one or the other I went with glowy letters. I also wish I could more realistically shade her right leg, but as I said in an earlier post my attempts to do so made it look as though she had been sitting in the dirt.

 

The cotton ball of fire really wasn't particularly difficult - pinch of a bit of cotton, wash it with a few different shades of orange, fluff it out again and stick it on the hand, than highlight with yellow. I watched a few YouTube tutorals on single point lighting and tried to follow the basic ideas... looking at it now, I think I over-did it on her outstretched arm. I didn't find anyone explicitly using cotton to represent fire, but I'd assume it's probably a fairly common trick. I'm curious as to the best way to hardcoat something like this... my wife warned me that this is actually a "synthetic cotton' which apparently dissolves in acetone, so I'm a bit worried what might happen if I hit it with spray-on varnish...

 

Anyway, C&C are always welcome, and I hope to see everyone over in the LTPK4 WIP (per forum advice I will tackle 3 last).

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... I have seen cotton fire and smoke many a time ...

 

I figured it was probably an over-used idea, and I went back and forth about whether to include it in the pics I posted. In the end, though, the shading on her arm/leg/hair wouldn't make any sense without it.

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I think the cotton sells fire pretty well, although your fire is inside out. From the shape of the flame, the source is down near the figure's hand, and the hottest (and whitest) part of a fire is the source.

 

The other recommendation I'd make is that if you're going to go for OSL, the part lit by the in-scene light source should be brighter than the rest of the model. Here, the color shift you applied to the left arm has made it the darkest part of the model's skin.

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Got a bit more Sorceress painted:-

 

gedc0348.jpg


gedc0347l.jpg

 

I made her hair highlight a bit too bright, so I went over it with a bit of thinned basecoat, and that seems to have blended it in nicely although I think I need to re-apply a few lines of shade.

But overall its turned out much nicer than my usual blonde hair formula of Vallejo Ice Yellow with a Sepia wash.

 

Her clothes are just basecoated at the moment, should have them finished tomorrow.

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... I have seen cotton fire and smoke many a time ...

 

I figured it was probably an over-used idea, and I went back and forth about whether to include it in the pics I posted. In the end, though, the shading on her arm/leg/hair wouldn't make any sense without it.

I wouldn't call it over used. It's used a lot because it works well

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I think the cotton sells fire pretty well, although your fire is inside out. From the shape of the flame, the source is down near the figure's hand, and the hottest (and whitest) part of a fire is the source.

 

Well, I actually did a bit of research on this, which is to say I Googled "flame color", which turned up a nice Wikipedia article. There's a nice discussion on that page that explains why in some cases the brightest parts of a flame will actually be up above the heat source.

 

I didn't actually read any of that at the time though, because as soon as I saw the "Flames of Charcoal" image I knew I'd found my go-by.

 

Reading it now, turns out that ineffecient combustion can produce incandescent soot particles, which then rise due to convection, leading to yellow-white highlight patterns. So my story is that the fire *is* realistic in that Laurana, like myself, is apparently more interested in producing fireballs that look awesome but are incapable of doing any real damage:

 

"I use my Awesome Fireball scroll on the goblins."

 

"Your fireball soars majestically across the field and engulfs the goblin raiders, whose eyes widen with horror as their bodies are consumed in a spectacular array of orange and golden flames. Please roll 10d6 for damage."

 

"Ok! <rolls> Huh. Ummm... ten."

 

"The goblins stare incredulously at one another for a long second, and then burst out laughing at your complete incompetence. Their leader pinches out a single smouldering whisker, then looks at the now almost charred ground until he can regain his composure. When his gaze does rise to meet yours, his brows are furrowed in confusion."

 

"Hooman, why you no wear any pants?"

 

The other recommendation I'd make is that if you're going to go for OSL, the part lit by the in-scene light source should be brighter than the rest of the model. Here, the color shift you applied to the left arm has made it the darkest part of the model's skin.

 

This I completely agree with.

 

The annoying thing is that I had intentionally made her hand the brightest object in the scene under the assumption that whatever I decided to do would be centered there... but I didn't account for my "special effect" actually obscuring the hand entirely. Poor planning, that. Oh well - when I'm done with the LTPK series I plan to go back and do a touch-up pass (notably, I plan to practise the LTPK3 NMM techniques on the various blades in the series), I may try to fix her arm then.

 

More likely, I'll get distracted and poor Laurana will live out her life with a poorly shaded arm. But hey - she knew the risks when she accepted the LTPK gig.

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Took a little longer than planned, but her clothes are finished:-

 

gedc0356n.jpg

 

The highlights on her vest are coming up very harsh in photo's but look good to the eye, so I'm not sure if I should fiddle about with them or not.

I had the same issue I would suspect it's more how your photo is setup than the paint, My only suggestion is that I think you might be stopping a bit short on the highlights on her chest, If you look from overhead of the mini you technically want to highlight everything you can see from that angle, think of your eye as the source of light and everything you can see is being lit up, so drag the highlight down further down and stop about mid breast were the light would fall off. that's what I did anyway.

Edited by pocketcthulhu
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Aku-Chan,

 

To add to the chorus of "if it looks good IRL, don't change it", note that the photo you posted is (on my monitor at least) substantially larger than the actual mini. Since shading minis involves over-emphasising transitions that would otherwise be unnoticeable to the human eye due to the small scale, *by definition* these transitions just won't look as good when magnified.

 

I imagine the reverse is also true - sahding effects that look great when scaled up by 300% may disappear completely when viewed at actual size.

 

As an example, I had to set my browsers' zoom level to 30% to bring the size of your photo down to roughly the same size as the actual mini. Viewed this way, your highlights look fine.

 

It's unfortunate that these photos tend to work against one of the basic principles of mini painting. It also essentially magnifies mistakes - I know the first photo I took of my LTPK1 rat my reaction was "Yeeesh! I can't post that!" See the glitch on my Tsuko's hand from a previous post... holding the mini in my hand I needed a magnifying glass to see it.

 

I wish we had some sort of special image viewer that would default pictures to 25% scale, then require users to push a button to zoom in. I think this would make people realize "I'm zooming in, so I expect some distortion". Right now the images essentially default to "already fully magnified", and so it takes a concious effort to realize that what we're seeing isn't always representative of the actual-sized mini.

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Thanks for all the support guys!

 

In the end I extended the highlights on her boobs a bit, but left her tummy highlights alone:-

 

gedc0362t.jpg

 

She's almost finished now, just her base (and necklace, which I forgot about until I took this photo) to go.

 

There's not much of it to see in this shot, but I used that Liquitex Airbrush Medium to thin my Antique Gold, best stuff ever!

 

Next up, I want to see if you really could do Kit 3 at this point, so I'm going to attempt to paint one mini from it now and then do the other after I've finished Kits 4 and 5.

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Thanks for all the support guys!

 

In the end I extended the highlights on her boobs a bit, but left her tummy highlights alone:-

 

gedc0362t.jpg

 

She's almost finished now, just her base (and necklace, which I forgot about until I took this photo) to go.

 

There's not much of it to see in this shot, but I used that Liquitex Airbrush Medium to thin my Antique Gold, best stuff ever!

 

Next up, I want to see if you really could do Kit 3 at this point, so I'm going to attempt to paint one mini from it now and then do the other after I've finished Kits 4 and 5.

lol good luck with 3, I'm still working on 5 atm.

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The trick to 3 is smooth colour transitions. When I look at the model above many of the transitions are very stark, like paint has been applied heavily. This is solved in 2 ways, first is always thin the paint at least a little (ok sometimes the paint is thin enough but by default it isn't) and the when applying it do so with a light touch so you apply less to start with and more at the end. This light bit to start with helps smooth the transition of layers.

 

Take some time to look at photos of people study the highlight to shadow transitions you see on the different materials in the photo; flesh, hair, leather, latex, natural fibre/polyester, silk, metals all reflect light in different ways and in our painting we need to use those to foster the illusion of the mini having different materials on them.

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