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Greetings everyone,

 

I was hoping to get everyone's solution for using Woodland Scenics Realistic Water product on your bases. More importantly, I'm hoping to find information about how to keep Realistic Water on a non-recessed base!

 

So what's your secret to keeping the product on there while not getting a funky concave edge or bulges? Or on a round base?

 

Thanks in advance for your help!

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I used this stuff a lot, my Ice Base tutorial shows how I do.

 

It's great for small amounts of water but if you're not using a lipped base you're going to need to carve into your base and add something that can hold it or sculpt something that will. Clay will work if you want it to be temporary but you've got to have a really good seal.

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So what's your secret to keeping the product on there while not getting a funky concave edge or bulges?

 

I'm also looking for this answer. I think a formwork will be required. I’ll probably be using Realistic Water myself on my next scenic base.

There’s some good video about Woodland Scenics on Youtube, I could see interesting ones about Realistic Water effects.

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So what's your secret to keeping the product on there while not getting a funky concave edge or bulges?

 

I'm also looking for this answer. I think a formwork will be required. I’ll probably be using Realistic Water myself on my next scenic base.

There’s some good video about Woodland Scenics on Youtube, I could see interesting ones about Realistic Water effects.

 

Unfortunately, they only cover using the product in a depression. What I intend to do, is have the product be at the edge of a base. I've found some videos on YouTube that deal with this problem, but because of using a barrier, the realistic water has a tendency to climb up the sides, leaving a concave edge at the barrier. This wouldn't be a big deal when doing a large scale train layout, but for 28mm mini's, it's huge.

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My solution is to use Envirotex Lite.

 

It is nice to know that there is an alternative product that you can use to make a high gloss finish and wont eat through paint and other modelling compounds.

 

Unfortunately, that doesn't answer the question of how to keep it on your base. Letting the product run off of the sides as stated in the instruction manual wouldn't work for me, as I'm trying to create "deep" water. I'm going for roughly 1/3"-1/2".

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A rather crude solution, but could you try attaching clear overhead projector film in a ring round your base to form a rim, use your water then if possible remove the film... if not, well at least its clear.

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1) I wouldn't recommend using Realistic Water for deep water. My information is that it is not stable in the long term and doesn't work well poured deep, even in layers.

 

2) If you're going to pour deep "water" and have a rectangular base, Legos work well to build a rigid, straight wall. Make sure you cover them with something smooth and fluid tight.

 

3) That won't stop the meniscus or remove all texture from the edge. For that, you'll need to polish the face and possibly grind or carve the edge.

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