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Ok, my typical order for doing a figure seems to be:

  1. Clean miniature of flashing/mold lines
  2. attach to base
  3. sculpt/glue sand to base
  4. prime
  5. paint figure
  6. paint base
  7. add static grass (or will be. Going to try that on Dita)

 

Am I doing this in the right order?

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perfect! Alternatively if you want to do a fancy base or sculpt something, you can attach miniature to cork, prime and paint first in order to reach all the fiddly bits that are harder to reach later (sometimes I wait to attach troublesome limbs because they're in my way) and then attach to base, add fun stuff, and finish painting. Also... you may want to add a step in between 4 and 5:

 

4. prime

4.5 remove even more stupid mold lines that I swear grew on the miniature overnight (grrrr. argh. I hate mold lines like you hate painting eyes :;): )

5. paint figure

 

have fun!!!

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That's a very workable order. It's not the one I use. :;):

 

I prefer to paint the figure on a painting stand (I use pieces of scrap 1"x2" lumber about 4-6" long) and base when the figure is fully painted.

 

I'd also recommend that you consider more than just static grass on the base. I use bits of clump foliage for weeds, rocks of various sizes, broken cork, sand, bare "earth", whatever seems reasonably likely to help the effect I'm going for.

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Most of my basing material other than epoxy putty and grass is free. Pine-bark mulch is a good source of "rocks". Cattails make good tall grass (once they explode). Many weeds make good vegetation and their roots make good trees.

 

Much of nature is fractal. When you look closely at it, you see many of the same shapes reiterated in miniature. If you take that close look, you'll find many things that you can effectively use. Just make sure you use good containers so your family doesn't get annoyed at all the debris. ^_^

 

Edit: Sand works great -- for gravel.

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I always stick my miniature on a little balsawood base and remove him afterwards, glue him to the base and then create the base afterwards. Keep in mind however my bases are very simple.

 

For materials, i grabbed a pile of sand from the street one spring before it all got swept up and use the grains of sands for rocks (I grabbed enough to fit in a baggie three years ago and still have more than enough). From somewhere on the forum I was given the idea to use corn meal for dirt/sand/gravel (I think from Jubilee?) and then just paint it whatever color you want it to be depending on the nature of your base.

 

Snow is baking soda/powder, the one that comes in the little circular tin, and I buy grass from the hobby store. I use green stuff to even out the metal base the figure is on with the little plastic Warmachine base.

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Stupid slightly derailing question, but what if you want to use a miniature for both dungeons and outside?

 

Any basing tricks so your miniatures don't end up having grass growing in a dungeon? (:

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YES!

 

Magnets!

 

You can get a strong, small magnet, and glue it under the base (probably two, one for each foot) then use pins (those used in sewing) as your pin rods but make them flush with the base. You'll need a lot, 3 each foot probably, of the pins though to get a strong enough attraction to the magnets.

 

I've only done this with familiars for my spellcasters but in theory it should work on the larger scale.

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The amber waves of grain on level 43 of helldungeon! Yeah, my pet peeve with modern basing.

 

I'm still firmly entrenched as a sculpted base fan. So to answer Argentee, if it comes with an integral sculpted base or a nice plain integral base, I glue the base to a paint pot. I tried blue tack with the Bones Ogre and he kept getting floppy on me. I don't like the way superglue bonds the mini to the lid, but it's definitely solid for painting!

 

If it's a slotted type mini or if I'm adding an alternate sculpted base, I'll saw off the old base or slot tab and drill&pin the mini and pin it to a cork.

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I had the luck of running across a model railroad shop that was going out of business. I have ~15 bags of different colors and grades of ballast (sand) and 360 cu in of various colors of lichen. All that for less than $10. I was also able to pick up some odd sized brass rods and tubes for cheap.

 

Oh, Add seal before adding static grass.

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