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So, last weekend my family went on our semi-annual pilgrimage to our F not-so-LGS. Along with the needful supplies, I spotted this and thought she was awesome enough to pick up.

 

(The packaging in the store said "Kosumi, Lupine Alpha Guardian," and I saw her in my mind's eye as completely different from the paint job online ... more of a giant female red were-fox kitsune warrior than a snow wolf.)

 

She comes in two pieces, her body and arms. The arm piece is her entire left arm up to the shoulder and her right hand to the wrist holding her weapon (this is from her perspective, so to us the arm is on the right and the hand on the left).

 

My question is this: Would it be a good idea to pin the wrist? It sits in the bracer, but I look at the join and wonder if it will be strong enough. I've never pinned anything before, but I have a pin vise and some 24 gauge and 28 gauge stainless steel wire.

 

I guess I'm a little nervous about it, but I think I might like to try.

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When you get those "egg" style joins, grab a file and file a wee bit of flat surface on that concave part. It helps a great deal when you are trying to get the pesky drill bit to start the hole in the

http://www.squadron.com/product-p/sq10821.htm I have this set, and the biggest one in it is the thickness of a medium paperclip. The smallest is pretty tiny.

I use the tip of my knife to set the holes before drilling no matter the curvature.

Shoulder, eh? That makes sense.

 

We use all of our minis for play. We're pretty careful with them but, well, we do have kids. I don't think we could classify anything as "display only."

 

So are you saying that if a mini were for display only, you would not pin it? Does it affect the appearance? Or is it rather that it's a bother to pin and not worth it for something that will sit safe on a shelf.

 

I'm sorry to be a nuisance. It's still all rather new to me.

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I also tend to pin everything, but I'd recommend at least pinning the arm.

 

And I know it's too late as you already have the stainless steel wire, but I just use standard size paperclips for pinning stuff.

I already have the wire from other art projects, so it's not a waste, but thanks for the paper clip tip.

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Shoulder, eh? That makes sense.

 

We use all of our minis for play. We're pretty careful with them but, well, we do have kids. I don't think we could classify anything as "display only."

 

So are you saying that if a mini were for display only, you would not pin it? Does it affect the appearance? Or is it rather that it's a bother to pin and not worth it for something that will sit safe on a shelf.

 

I'm sorry to be a nuisance. It's still all rather new to me.

 

Generally, I skip pinning because it is a nuisance. A properly done pin will not affect the look of the piece; it should be invisible (ideally). Display pieces get pinned less because they shouldn't be often handled, and so don't risk having bits break off.

 

-Dave

 

P.S. I hate pinning. It never works right for me.... But I still try.

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I agree with pinning as well. I would drill the body and the weapon/arm/hand where they will be connecting and glue the pins into the body as anchors. Dry fit before glueing anything though to make sure it all fits and is positioned correctly. For tricky or tight fits I'll drill larger holes and use more than one much smaller pin to give me some wiggle room.

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I always vote for pinning over non-pinning. Even that small wrist. That is what my smallest drill bits are for. Minis get handled, even display models occasionally may get packed up or picked up, or topple, or get handled during painting. Give your mini a solid base and you will not be sorry.

 

And I pin in brass rods, cleaner, less likely to injure my clippers, and I buy in 3 sizes that seem to cover all my needs.

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I'd pin. The only reason I don't pin that much is because my hand drill is crooked and most uncooperative.

 

This is also why most of my metal collection never leaves the shelf for service.

 

Thank Willy Wonka and all his Oompa Loompas that the hand drill worked on Takhisamat, all I got to say.

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speaking of small drill bits... and advicer where I can find a supplier of the really little ones? like small enough to drill the barrel of a bolt pistol.

 

http://www.squadron.com/product-p/sq10821.htm I have this set, and the biggest one in it is the thickness of a medium paperclip. The smallest is pretty tiny.

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speaking of small drill bits... and advicer where I can find a supplier of the really little ones? like small enough to drill the barrel of a bolt pistol.

 

We ended up getting a ton of watch bits (for watch repairmen) in an auction that I use in my pin vice. The only problem? They're all left-handed bits (i.e. they all turn backwards).

 

ETA: Finished the original thought....

Edited by dispatchdave
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Guitar string is a great tip for pinning. If you break a string, it serves double duty. The wound strings that are thicker practically hold the bits together without the glue!!

Another note on guitar strings is that the wound ones (the ones with ridges, if you don't play) have so much more surface area to grip. With a properly sized hole, one could get away without glue.

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