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Some chalk with your Burgundy Wine, Sir?


Spinward Bound
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aaaaahhhhh..... the 'not-runny' part would be what I've been missing.

 

 

Yeah - you know how with a wash you load up the brush and let it go all over the place? Well with a glaze you're sort of in between that and the amount of load you'd use for a layer. It's a bit less under control than a layer, not quite as runny as a wash - so you have to wick some of it off the brush before you apply.

 

And it's real thin because it's just slightly altering the colours underneath. I use it most often when I have to correct for bad transitions - like on my Bones flit where his wings are too starkly defined. I'll make a glaze of the midtone and then apply that over the offending area to tone it down and see if I can make the transition a little more easygoing.

 

Everybody will learn glazing eventually, because highlighting black is one of the most evil things to attempt and it's so very easy to overdo. When that happens and somebody looks at it, thinks it looks wrong, and then corrects it by using very thinned black to tone it down they're pretty much putting glazing into action.

 

You can do other stuff with it, too, if you want to get all fancypants with it.

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Buglips has it nailed on the head. There's not much difference between a glaze and a wash based off of how you make one, the real difference is how much you have on your brush and how you apply it. When I glaze, which is about 90% of a mini%, my brush is only barley damp and I'll test this on my finger. I want to to be wet to the touch but not leave streaks of liquid on my finger.

 

When making a glaze adding matte medium can be really helpfully but you cannot just water down paint with paint only (which is what matte medium is--pigmentless paint) so you still have to use water. I have several different consistencies for glazes, about 6-8:1 (water:paint) which is used for my base coat and is used for reclaiming and blending. A really thin 15+:1 of the base coat for blending as well (this is almost more a wash in how I use it) then 8-10:1 for my shades and highlights. Sometime, with highlights you need a thicker mix (hi white and flesh tones!).

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I went back and did a bunch of layers with some of the matte stuff mixed in and it got rid of most of the chalkiness. There is still some there but it's hard to notice unless I'm looking for it. I would have kept going but I was getting shadows where there shouldn't be any so called it quits.

 

 

I started glazing a different part with the same paints, this time starting with the matte medium mixed in, and got no chalkiness. (Well, maybe a "its probably all in my head" smidge, but nothing like last time.

 

 

I probably just need to work out my ratios of paint/matte/water.

Edited by Spinward Bound
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It's very, very easy. Take a mini with a cloak that's got some folds. Paint it black. Next take a mid-tone gray and paint the raised parts, make it very stark. Allow to dry. Then thin down some black, say, 8 parts water to 1 part black, load a brush, wick it off on some paper towel - apply.

 

That's glazing. You'll immediately get what it's about and start thinking about ways to use it (normally you won't be glazing over something that stark, but it'll help you see what's going on as you practice). Like on my Takky thread doing the green head when I accidentally made the eyes look wasted. Quick glaze of ruddy flesh and, presto, like a blast of Visine. More monster than munchies.

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The only glazing you really need to do is the light base coat one and maybe a light highlights depending on what you're doing. Then you just feather between your colors (imaging alternating \\\\\ and ///// with your colors) then giving them a glaze. Repeat as desired.

 

I use glazing for most everything because basically I'm water painting on my minis and I love the range of colors you can get but it's also crazy slow.

Edited by MonkeySloth
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I really need to see this in person. Mastering this will really help my ability to blend and knock my big butt into a wholenother skill bracket...

Go look at my dwarf woman in show off. (This is also the one that was getting chalky)

 

http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/47589-dwarf-woman/

 

Look at her belly and notice how the really dark purple blends into the red, that was me trying to glaze. Now look at the red stripe on her belly, that was me not glazing.

 

I wouldn't use that as a great example though, I'm still trying to figure it all out, but it really avoids the sharp lines between shades when blending.

Edited by Spinward Bound
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