Jump to content

Acrylic Paints Question


Hells_Clown
 Share

Recommended Posts

Why is it that if acrylic paints are water based that added water to thin them causes them to seperate?

 

I don't suppose there's a way to thin paint without causing it to break up? One of the reasons I don't like thinning my paints is I spend too much time stirring it to reblend the colors and it seems to seperate while I'm putting it on my brush.

 

Are some paints better and staying together than others?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 7
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

HC, I thin my paints using a certain amount of extender and flow improver and a little bit of water. Thinning with just plain water does not work as well as if you use the extender and flow improver. Usually for about 4 drops paint, I use one drop of extender and one drop flow improver. Sometimes two drops extender. The ratio you use will determine how thin you make your paint. You want something really thin? Less paint more extender and more flow improver plus a drop or two of water. Another thing you can try is acrylic diluent, and a hint of water.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Water does me fine for the most part, I find some of the extenders can make your paint a little greasy (for want of a better word). If I have mixed up a color for a particular long job I will use the Vallejo Retardant to keep it from drying out too quickly.

 

This is the retardant : green3.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why is it that if acrylic paints are water based that added water to thin them causes them to seperate?

 

I don't suppose there's a way to thin paint without causing it to break up? One of the reasons I don't like thinning my paints is I spend too much time stirring it to reblend the colors and it seems to seperate while I'm putting it on my brush.

 

Are some paints better and staying together than others?

It seperates because the pigment is a powder that is mixed into the paint, it does not mix in like, say, Kool-Aid or sugar (oh, what, same thing :;): ). Instead, what you are using is pretty much fine power in a functional liquid suspension containing binders.

 

The more you thin the paint, the more you are spreading out this powder.

Higher quality (not always higher priced!) paints have the higher pigment density that allows them to be thinned more without the grainy look.

 

The crappy-er brands use less pigment and coarser pigment, thus thinning results in the pigment showing it's self all over your peice.

 

This is one of the reasons that I like the water based airbrush colors on the market, they have to have a fine dense pigment, otherwise clogged brushed and/or weak colors, plus they are already thinned in many cases.

 

And all answers are dependent upon the type of paint, I only answered in relation to the water based acrylics you asked about.

 

 

 

Too much answer? :blink: Or not enough? :huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you use Airbrush type paints as brush-on, though? I thought there was a slight difference between the brush-on and airbrush that went beyond grain.

In most cases, yes! And they are fine and smooth and have some great colors available. Definitely something worth looking at.

 

 

Just make sure that you are looking at water based acrylics, as these are what the majority of us are using, from what I see and read.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seperates because the pigment is a powder that is mixed into the paint, it does not mix in like, say, Kool-Aid or sugar (oh, what, same thing :;): ). Instead, what you are using is pretty much fine power in a functional liquid suspension containing binders.

 

The more you thin the paint, the more you are spreading out this powder.

Higher quality (not always higher priced!) paints have the higher pigment density that allows them to be thinned more without the grainy look.

 

The crappy-er brands use less pigment and coarser pigment, thus thinning results in the pigment showing it's self all over your peice.

 

This is one of the reasons that I like the water based airbrush colors on the market, they have to have a fine dense pigment, otherwise clogged brushed and/or weak colors, plus they are already thinned in many cases.

 

And all answers are dependent upon the type of paint, I only answered in relation to the water based acrylics you asked about.

 

 

 

Too much answer? :blink: Or not enough? :huh:

I use Vallejo Model Colors almost exclusively, that's why I asked. They're supposed to be one of, if not the best paints on the market. One drop of water and the color starts to seperate.

 

Very annoying.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...