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14321: Bowsister (In which I get started, sort of)


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First off, welcome to the forum! Second off, your off to a great start with your minis!

 

When it comes to steadiness and painting very fine details like eyes, I have a couple of tips for you. My first, most important piece of advice is to brace your hands against the table, and against each other. I'm a right handed painter, so I hold my brush in my right hand, and my figure (or more precisely my painting handle with the miniature on it) in my left hand. I then rest both wrists, or at least my left wrist, against the edge of my painting table and the heel of my right palm against the heel of my left palm. I also possibly choke up on the painting handle and brace my right pinky against the fingers from my other hand. Just play around with bracing your hands and I'm sure you'll find a position which works for you. The principle is the same as shooting (if you've done much of that): the fewer points of contact between you, your gun, and the ground; the less accurate you'll be. So, metaphorically, don't shoot (paint) standing up, shoot (paint) prone and you'll be much more steady.

 

My second piece of advice is that steadiness and the ability to paint fine details does improve greatly with practice. One little trick that I picked up at ReaperCon to improve your brush control is to always make the same up to down "I" stroke with your brush. Don't change your brush stroke when you need to paint an area that cannot be painted with a simple verticle stroke; change how you're holding the figure. You'll build up muscle memory for your brush stroke quickly and have a reliable stroke that you can use to paint fine details with less trouble.

 

Finally, one last great practice technique for improving brush control is to "line" all your miniatures. This is the act of painting a thin, very dark line between items of different colors on your miniature. This has the amazing benefit to your painting of adding more definition to your figure while at the same time improving your brush control, so it's a win-win situation.

 

Anyway, keep painting and remember to have fun with it and you'll get better in no time!

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My second piece of advice is that steadiness and the ability to paint fine details does improve greatly with practice. One little trick that I picked up at ReaperCon to improve your brush control is to always make the same up to down "I" stroke with your brush. Don't change your brush stroke when you need to paint an area that cannot be painted with a simple verticle stroke; change how you're holding the figure. You'll build up muscle memory for your brush stroke quickly and have a reliable stroke that you can use to paint fine details with less trouble.

 

Finally, one last great practice technique for improving brush control is to "line" all your miniatures. This is the act of painting a thin, very dark line between items of different colors on your miniature. This has the amazing benefit to your painting of adding more definition to your figure while at the same time improving your brush control, so it's a win-win situation.

Both great pieces of advise. The former I had not heard of before and will definitely take that on board. The later I have seen CashWiley doing and plan on trying out on four Sedition War character models to see what difference it makes. Thanks :)

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