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Was priming a barrier for you?


Frankthedm
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A thought just zipped through my head. How many folks who would have been interested in painting minis years ago, but got swayed away because of the priming aspect of metal figs. How many folks just gave up wondering, "why isn't the paint sticking?" Or those who glopped on brush on primer and wondered "where did the detail go?!" And of course what about those who spray primed indoors and wondered "Whoa why is my mini spinning?!"

 

Speak up! Let us hear about the false starts you had before bones.

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I got started with a group of experienced wargamers in 1974 - so I knew about using primers right from the start. We played with Napoleonic Wargaming and, about four years later, System 7 Napoleonics. (Anyone remember those rules?)

 

I recently found out that the Minifig Prussians that were the first minis that ever I painted are still in production. Looking at them all that I can think is 'wow, minis have come a long way since then....'

 

The Auld Grump

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I got into gaming minis from scale models, so priming was a given. It's just part of what you do if you want a good looking paint job: prep, wash, prime. If you always do it, then you never have a problem. For that matter, minis are easier... no wet sanding between primer coats ;-)

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I primed minis right from the start. At the time I used brush on primers and sealers. As the miniature hobby grew and supplies for it became more available, I switched to sprays and still use them.

 

I think I will stick for sprays for priming, but I have been considering going back to using brush on sealers.

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I was a kid and didn't have anyone to teach me, just a few cryptic comments in "Dragon" magazine and the set of acrylics my grandmother gave me for my eleventh birthday.

 

But I knew from art that you didn't just put paint on things, except maybe eggshells, without priming them first. I didn't have gesso, so I just used white paint thinned down, which turned out to work really well. I trimmed minis with a pair of nail clippers which had a file attached for flash.

 

I didn't like the solvents in enamels or spray paint and wouldn't have been allowed to handle spray paint anyway. I didn't even know other painters used enamels at that time until very recently. I just thought they put really shiny varnish on their paint jobs.

 

It was a simple system, but since I had no expectations it worked for me.

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I started painting with Testors Enamels and never realized you needed primer. I never had problems with paint not sticking. I can remember reading about priming and thinking it was a terrible idea. I used to glop on thick coats of paint, so I figured glopping on a base coat first would totally hide all the mini details.

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I started with enamels - no primer used. By the time I switched to water based, I used thinned black paint for a base coat. From there, I progressed to spray primer. Last year I'd finally had it with fuzzy primer coats from bad batches / bad weather / wrong phase of the moon and switch to brush on primer.

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My first mini painting experience was the figures from Shadows Over Camelot. I'd grabbed the Citadel basic colours set but didn't know all the tricks (okay, I still don't. I knew even less then though) so when I read something vaguely mentioning priming with black I just painted black paint on the minis as the first coat. Worked well enough...

 

I've recently got some of the Reaper brush-on primer, which is my first foray into real primers. Between my first attempts and now I've been using a regular spray paint.

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I got started with a group of experienced wargamers in 1974 - so I knew about using primers right from the start. We played with Napoleonic Wargaming and, about four years later, System 7 Napoleonics. (Anyone remember those rules?)

 

System 7 caused a huge rift in the gaming industry. They were nominated for, and won, the Origins award for "Best Historical Miniatures Line". Since they weren't miniatures, this really hacked off the historical miniatures folks. The problem, of course, is that they didn't fit comfortably into any of the existing categories, so "Historical Miniatures" was a best (though still poor) fit compromise.

 

To a large extent, the HMGS arose from that rift.

 

I recently found out that the Minifig Prussians that were the first minis that ever I painted are still in production. Looking at them all that I can think is 'wow, minis have come a long way since then....'

 

The Auld Grump

 

Yeah, the old Minfigs historicals lines were weak, at best. FWIW, the Minifigs resculpts of figures for those periods are quite a lot better. After the GFI debacle, they're a bit harder to find in the US, though.

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I got interested in miniatures the first time around around 2001 or 2002. My first 6 or 7 minis came from Reaper and were all Sandra Garrity sculpts. I read on the interwebz about priming, and I used white and black spray on primer from Wal-mart (cheapo stuff). I bought a handful of basic colors in the Craft paint, and a bunch of itty bitty synthetic brushes. I still remember having problems with the primer, as a result I hate spray on priming.

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