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So, I recently got some Coat D'arms paints on the advice of a certain goblin. They're working decent well, but I have trouble getting them from the pot to the palette. I'm used to dropper bottles. I put a drop of paint in, a drop of my thinning solution, mix with a wooden skewer, and all is good. How do you work with the paint pots? So far, I've been taking a thick brush, dipping it in, getting as much off in the palette well as possible, and then adding my thinner. It kind of works, but it's hard to be consistent, and it's pretty wasteful, since most of the paint stays on the brush and ends up in my wastewater. There's got to be a better way. Please enlighten me.

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I use Testors white handle medium brushes and mix amounts by eye. One brush of that is usually about two MSP drops. With CDA the pigment is so strong replicating a mix is easy even if the amounts aren't precise.

 

Transferring will work, but it's more expense and might need flow improver. Testors brush is cheap, easy, and pretty indestructible.

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I figured it might be helpful to show what I mean. So here's some CDA Barbarian Leather, my trusty white brush (not so white these days), and a white bottle cap I mix in (I don't use a palette, for my quick paint method this is generally more useful and less wasteful).

 

.mixing001_zps75bf539a.jpg

 

 

So I then take the brush and load it up to about this amount:

 

.mixing002_zps005f7172.jpg

 

Add a glob into my bottle cap:

 

.mixing003_zps2715e6e2.jpg

 

Then take some MSP (in this case, Brown Liner as it's most likely to come out right for this example)

 

.mixing004_zpsa47bf84b.jpg

 

And two drops later, there we are. Roughly the same size, but if you wanted it closer and more precise, put your dropper paint drops down first and then match the glob size with the brush as best you can.

 

.mixing005_zpse79cd887.jpg

 

 

 

Once you get used to doing it like that you're ready for anything - and if one of your nozzles stops working you can use the MSP container like a pot. (I do this as a matter of course, finding dropper bottles far too tempermental).

Edited by buglips*the*goblin
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You can also get palette knives and use those to scoop up your paint and transfer it. They're like, $2 for a pack of 4 different shapes and sizes at Michaels.

Palette knives are what I use in my studio all the time.

 

Paint brushes are designed for applying paint. They are vey good at that.

 

They make very poor paint transferring devices. As you have noticed, they are wasteful and paint stays in the brush, which can also lead to color cross-contamination if you dip them in another jar.

 

With palette knives you can remove a precise amount of paint from the jar and place nearly every bit of it onto your palette when you swipe the blade onto it, and they wipe clean in an instant.

 

I paint large canvases (Boards, really. It's years since I used a canvas.) and occasional giant fiberglass sculptures (Okay, only the one. But it was displayed at Navy Pier in Chicago.). I use paint from jars all the time.

 

It may not work so much on the scale of one or two drops of paint, but on the large scale palette knives are also the most efficient, least wasteful way to mix colors. They are precise, and you can use the edge to scrape all the paint into a little area and the flat to mash and mix it together.

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I paint large canvases (Boards, really. It's years since I used a canvas.) and occasional giant fiberglass sculptures (Okay, only the one. But it was displayed at Navy Pier in Chicago.). I use paint from jars all the time.

 

It may not work so much on the scale of one or two drops of paint, but on the large scale palette knives are also the most efficient, least wasteful way to mix colors. They are precise, and you can use the edge to scrape all the paint into a little area and the flat to mash and mix it together.

 

oooo! You're a Professional! Where's a picture? It sounds interesting ::):

 

They work pretty good for little bits of paint if you're careful. I got annoyed at being careful and transferred all my paint pots to droppers.

Edited by redambrosia
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I paint large canvases (Boards, really. It's years since I used a canvas.) and occasional giant fiberglass sculptures (Okay, only the one. But it was displayed at Navy Pier in Chicago.). I use paint from jars all the time.

It may not work so much on the scale of one or two drops of paint, but on the large scale palette knives are also the most efficient, least wasteful way to mix colors. They are precise, and you can use the edge to scrape all the paint into a little area and the flat to mash and mix it together.

oooo! You're a Professional! Where's a picture? It sounds interesting ::):

 

They work pretty good for little bits of paint if you're careful. I got annoyed at being careful and transferred all my paint pots to droppers.

Okay, it's off-topic, but here's the biggest mini I ever painted.

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Mmm. They do. In fact, I still have an empty one. Not sure how easy this will be, but it's worth trying.

I bought a dozen of them a while ago and transferred all my paint from my GW pots. Best idea ever!

 

Due to GW paints being very thick in the pots I made a mix of water/flow aid/ and dry extender in an empty dropper bottle and added to each color in the pot till the consistency was closer to what reaper MSP paint is. then it was much easier to pour into the new eyedroppers. It was a little messy but they work great now and was worth the effort.

 

WTDkIHj.jpg

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I paint large canvases (Boards, really. It's years since I used a canvas.) and occasional giant fiberglass sculptures (Okay, only the one. But it was displayed at Navy Pier in Chicago.). I use paint from jars all the time.

It may not work so much on the scale of one or two drops of paint, but on the large scale palette knives are also the most efficient, least wasteful way to mix colors. They are precise, and you can use the edge to scrape all the paint into a little area and the flat to mash and mix it together.

oooo! You're a Professional! Where's a picture? It sounds interesting ::):

 

They work pretty good for little bits of paint if you're careful. I got annoyed at being careful and transferred all my paint pots to droppers.

Okay, it's off-topic, but here's the biggest mini I ever painted.

1.5 m diameter? So, almost as big as Kaladrax! Seriously though, cool project.

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I paint large canvases (Boards, really. It's years since I used a canvas.) and occasional giant fiberglass sculptures (Okay, only the one. But it was displayed at Navy Pier in Chicago.). I use paint from jars all the time.

It may not work so much on the scale of one or two drops of paint, but on the large scale palette knives are also the most efficient, least wasteful way to mix colors. They are precise, and you can use the edge to scrape all the paint into a little area and the flat to mash and mix it together.

oooo! You're a Professional! Where's a picture? It sounds interesting ::):

 

They work pretty good for little bits of paint if you're careful. I got annoyed at being careful and transferred all my paint pots to droppers.

Okay, it's off-topic, but here's the biggest mini I ever painted.

That looks considerable larger than the biggest minis I have painted:

http://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/p/carousel-horses.html

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