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Having trouble with RMS paints...


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I confirmed that with Ashen Grey I had not yet broken the seal (has anyone else had an ... erm... oopsie?... while attempting to shove a paperclip through the hole?)

 

 

This why you use a large gauge needle to poke the hole out. I use a very large safety pin. paperclips are acc..acc...accidents waiting to happen.

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Ok Mr. Rocket Surgeon, now explain the white brush on primer that came in my LTPK1 that had basically hardened into a rubber sponge. It looked like the middle section of a loofah, and had very little moisture left at all!

Buglips has it basically right. The acrylic resin is an emulsion in water and when the water evaporates the plastic resins bond together into a permanent waterproof plastic film or solid. Freezing separates the water out into ice crystals, leaving a mass of tiny grains of dried paint, or sometimes a spongy wreck. At least that's what I got when I froze a tube of cheap acrylic paint to find out why we were warned against it back when I was a student.

 

I have seen people online talk with confidence about acrylics being able to survive freeze-thaw cycles, but my experience, and all the warnings in actual published books I have read by researched and fact-checked authors, say no.

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I confirmed that with Ashen Grey I had not yet broken the seal (has anyone else had an ... erm... oopsie?... while attempting to shove a paperclip through the hole?)

 

 

This why you use a large gauge needle to poke the hole out. I use a very large safety pin. paperclips are acc..acc...accidents waiting to happen.

 

Ah I guess that would explain why the grass green from my L2PK1 would not work at all...

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Thank you for the good explanations Buglips and Pingo.

 

While we're on this topic, shaking: Can you over shake Reaper paints?

 

In a single session, if the paints are new or if they have not been used in say 3-6 months, is there a point that you can shake them too much/too long, and what is that point?

 

The paints I was using for the L2PK1 I had been shaking for about 45 seconds each session. While I really doubt I overdid it, when I dropped the paints out, they did come out with airbubbles in them, and while painting the paint came out on the mini with tiny bubbles on it. Now, it is entirely possible that I just suck at painting and I could have used better brush usage to get rid of the bubbles, but the original question still stands.

 

To better break it down for you expert:

What is the minimum and maximum time you will shake a dropper bottle of paint that you've:
A: Used in several sessions over the last few weeks?

B: Have not used in a long time or ever?

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It's not a perfect technique, but when my paint has bubbles on the figure, a quick, sharp puff of air tends to pop most of them. If the paint is nearly dry, I find running a clean, barely damp soft brush over the bubbles pops them and smooths out the paint. If any bubbles have dried in crevices, a gentle draw with the point of an exacto knife cleans away most of the bumps.

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I left 4 bottles in my vortex mixer for about 35 minutes because the phone rang upstairs, and then I ADD'd for about a half hour before remembering what I was doing (after trying to figure out where that buzzing noise was coming from and tracing it back to my paint area in the basement).

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Did anything happen to the paints Qwyk?

 

As far as the bubbles go, if I see them in the paint on the pallet, I've been sweeping the paint up the wall of the well as I dip the brush in, it seems to help kill the bubbles before they get to the mini.

 

I tried the blowing technique and it resulted in paint where paint was not supposed to be. The soft damp brush is a pretty nice one however, I'll try that if it happens again.

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Speaking of paint agitation...

 

I've heard of someone using a small ultrasonic cleaner as a paint agitator. They put the paint bottles into a zip-lock bag to protect the labels, immersed them in water, and let her rip. Now this sounds plausible to me but has anyone actually tried it? I was actually thinking of forgoing the water at all and just putting the paint bottles into the cleaning unit directly and seeing if it worked like that...

 

I've got some spare paints so I might just give it a try with a sacrificial bottle. Anyone got a recomendation on a color that normally seperates like a mofo?

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Bubbles from shaking paint will usually pop themselves on the palette, or the brush will pop them as you pick it up. It's more likely the bubbles you're seeing are being created on the miniature. This often happens painting over more textured surfaces like broccoli base texture, fur, stuff like that. Also happens more when you're glopping paint on for base coats or washes as compared to the more carefully controlled painting like layering. Watching out for them and popping them with the tip of the brush or gently blowing on them is the best solution I know of. I actually keep a can of compressed air by my painting desk and very carefully spray them with the trigger just barely depressed. (Or use my airbrush the same way if I happen to have it set up and compressor running.) If your paint is pooling and/or very watered down, you can spray it over stuff, so go carefully if you give that a try.

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I usually get bubbles when using a large brush and the hairs weren't wet when i wicked up the paint... or from scrubbing a bit too much across detail, like Wren said. I shake the heck out of my paints, never had them bubble (although some craft acrylic sealers and varnishes will bubble if shaken).

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Bone dry (as opposed to just barely damp) brushes will do it. The wetter the paint (and minis paint starts out very wet) the more likely bubbles are to form. Stiffer hairs on brushes can cause bubbles and so, as smokingwreckage noted, will a lot of scrubbing. Some additives make paint more prone to bubbling, but I haven't made a scientific study of which ones.

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