Jump to content

Thinking about Painting...


Recommended Posts

I was in a very similar place to you! I had 0 materials, and near 0 practice. But with 200-300 little plastic models coming in, I thought now was as good as ever to get into it!

 

I started off in this forum, reading peoples topics, learning the ways of the Goblin, and absorbing knowledge.

 

Like you, spurred on by the forum members I too ordered the L2PK's (1&2). I'm very glad I did. From date of payment to date of delivery it was just over 2 weeks, and I don't live in the US, so I call that pretty good, especially due to the Bones shipments!

 

I however then further proceeded to throw myself into the hobby. While not required, I went out and picked up some supplies that a lot of people kept talking about (You can read more details from my adventure if you skim over this topic: http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/48280-michaels-krylon-selection/). Not all of it was needed for a beginner, but in the end I'm glad I picked some of it up when I did.

 

Primarily the Knife, the Files and that light where all well worth it. The light was like $30 at a local hardware store (I got all that stuff from a hardware store actually). Even without the magnifying glass, just having a good strong light is damn useful.

 

The talk of Flash and mold lines in this topic, at first I wasnt too worried, but when I opened the L2PK1, I did notice a lot of extra little bits, and some heavy mold lines. While I could have just flicked off the metal bits and ignored the mold lines, they drove me crazy (personally) so I filed them down (once again, glad I bought those files).

 

In the end, as mentioned here, the L2PKs come with the vast majority of what you really need (paints, a paint brush and something to paint. The instructions are a definite bonus!). The only other things, like I mentioned, having a good light, something to cut with, and a nice space/surface to work on (I use my dining room table, but I put a large piece of poster paper down to avoid getting paint on anything).

 

Honestly I'm not an expert at this (In fact, to this point the only thing I've ever done so far is prime the first L2PK figure....), but I hope this advice helps!

 

As a final note, indeed, the set came with full paints (as seen here: http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/48013-learn-to-paint-kits-l2pk/?p=698177) however I do not think this is a permanent thing, and may be temporary. Still, an amazing deal! Now that I have the first 2 kits, I fully intend to buy the other 3!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 79
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Youtube has lots of tutorials, I have used lots of those. Reaper has a ton of great tutorials. Jenova project is also a great place to start. Games Workshop makes a lot of stuff, reaper makes tons of greats painting stuff as well. Start by using unthinned paint till you develop brush control then start diluting your paint. Sable brushes are what you want. NO SYNTHETICS, they 'hook.' Size 2, 1, and 000 are recommended. Winsor and newton series 7 are your top shelf brushes, but as already mentioned, any sable will suffice to begin. You have lots of paint options, gw, reaper, vallejo, coat d' arms and so forth. They all charge around the same price $2-$4 a bottle.

 

When I began I spent all my time studying the techniques described on how to paint minis.com (great site). Another helpful hint is to look at lots of galleries. Reaper, flickr (jdizzy001), cool mini or not, gw, etc, etc

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are as many different paint styles out there as there are people painting. Don't be afraid to try something different, you never know it may be your new favorite thing. I will chime in with everyone else that the L2PK are an amazing value. Most of all, don't be afraid to ask any questions you have here. This forum is filled with incredibly talented and friendly people. Just remember, there are no stupid questions, only stupid goblins.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So I just got my L2PKs (1 & 2) in the mail and...I have a few more questions. I read through the instructions for the first set and it seems to take a few things for granted. For example, it assumes I know how to clean a brush between using different paints. I assume I just dip it in water and dry the bristles on a paper towel? Or will drying it hurt the brush? How long does it take a miniture to dry from the primer? How do I test to make sure it's dry? More questions to follow, I'm sure...

Link to post
Share on other sites

So I just got my L2PKs (1 & 2) in the mail and...I have a few more questions. I read through the instructions for the first set and it seems to take a few things for granted. For example, it assumes I know how to clean a brush between using different paints. I assume I just dip it in water and dry the bristles on a paper towel? Or will drying it hurt the brush? How long does it take a miniture to dry from the primer? How do I test to make sure it's dry? More questions to follow, I'm sure...

And that's why you have us, to fill in the blank spaces. ::):

 

Swirl your brush in water, then wipe it dry on a paper towel. Rinse and repeat until there's no color left on the towel.

 

I'd recommend getting some brush soap from an art/hobby supply store at some point; it'll increase your brush's lifespan by a great deal.

 

Primer should dry in less than an hour, you might want to give it a bit longer just in case. I like to prime my minis in a batch and give them more than 24 hours. Just touch it, if it's tacky it's not ready.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Right. So I just finished doing the guard dude from kit 1 (just posted to the WIP page) your primer really doesn't take very long to dry. Both minis I primed at the same time, and where dry in an hour. Drying won't hurt the brush, just don't be terribly hard on it mostly just wipe it off. the little bit f moisture that remains won't effect anything else down the line..

 

One tip though, have two rinse containers. one for metalics, one for everything else. the metal (not really metal) flake will remain suspended in the water and can get into the brush and show up on the next bit of painting

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Forum Mascot

So I just got my L2PKs (1 & 2) in the mail and...I have a few more questions. I read through the instructions for the first set and it seems to take a few things for granted. For example, it assumes I know how to clean a brush between using different paints. I assume I just dip it in water and dry the bristles on a paper towel? Or will drying it hurt the brush? How long does it take a miniture to dry from the primer? How do I test to make sure it's dry? More questions to follow, I'm sure...

 

 

To elaborate, when you rinse your brush and go to wipe it, the correct procedure is to drag it lightly backwards (consider the tip of the bristles to be forward) along some paper towel. Not side to side or, Kaladrax forbid, forwards.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Brushes can be washed with any mild hand soap. Brush cleaner is okay too. I use Murphy's Oil Soap, and some use baby shampoo.

 

Use cool or warm water; hot water can soften the glue that holds the hairs.

 

Draw the soapy brush back and forth on your hand. As buglips says, never push it backwards or sideways. You can roll it gently in your fingers. Imagine you are washing a baby's hair, take that level of care of it. Rinse. Keep doing this until the soap suds have no color in them. Dry lying flat or upright. Never rest the brush on its hairs, not even in jars of water.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah the brush should stay the same shape the whole time. A glass jar is good, with clean water you can see the brush, and see if there's still pigment coming out.

 

Inevitably you will need some brush soap to clean, recondition, remove dried paint. Don't get it on the handle, some brands will remove the handle's paint!

Link to post
Share on other sites

When rinsing, I like to twirl (twist? spin?) the brush in my fingers, with the bristles at a downwards angle along the side of my rinse cup. It seems to draw a lot of the paint out. With a clear container, you can see when the paint stops coming out of the brush.

-DD

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd recommend both brush soap for use each time you paint (I use The Masters Brush Cleaner and Preserver, but there are many other choices) and a deep cleaner like Winsor & Newton Brush Cleaner and Restorer every few months. Even if you regularly clean your brushes, it's kind of amazing what the Winsor & Newton stuff will pull out when you use it.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this is kind of super-basic, but could a "brush use and care" video be done as part of the tutorials being put together? This thread is helpful, but I'm pretty sure I'm being way too hard on my brushes and it would be helpful to see with my eyes to correct way to treat them.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...