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I recently got back into miniatures. Well, I bought some regular primer from Home Depot and it dried really fast, which was a plus. But when I was painting, the primer was rubbing off, and when it wasn't rubbing off. The paint would like, 'chip' my paint. Is there a different type of primer that I could use to get more detail, or can I just somehow turn my primer into liquid primer. Any suggestions?

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What brand of primer did you buy? Reaper makes a brush on primer if you would prefer to go that route. There are an abundance of primers used by hobbyists, from the $.99 spray can from Walmart to the $15.00 spray can from Privateer Press. My personal preference is Floquil which has become somewhat difficult to get. GW makes a white primer that is probably readily available in your area, but their black"primer" is not really a primer its paint and yes it does make a difference.

 

I would recommend heading to the local hobby shop and see what they have on the shelves.

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What kind of miniature is it? I could be the wrong kind of primer, so it might not be compatible with your miniature's material. Most primers work with metal, but some don't work well with plastics. Some will come out too fast and get too thick if you aren't very careful. A light coat is all you need. A basic Krylon or Duplicolor will do the job, but some prefer fancier stuff like Tamiya or Privateer Press.

 

Assuming it was a spray, did you shake the can a couple minutes? You might not have let it cure long enough. An hour or so is typical. Or you applied it at a temperature or humidity the primer didn't like. Check the directions. Even if it doesn't say so, high humidity should be avoided. Too hot or too cold are also bad. Those are probably the most likely causes of spray primer failure.

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Photo of the mini could help. Naming the brand of primer could be helpful.

 

What type of mini was it? Some rubbery plastic minis chemically react to spray propellants. Brite Touch Red primer reacts to DDM / Star wars minis, staying tacky for a long time.

 

Did you wash the mini with a degreasing soap, like dish soap, then rinse well? Resin often have a lot of mold release.

 

I've used hardware store primer without many issues on metal. I've gotten a bad can that came out like flock once in a while.

Edited by Frankthedm

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Well, to answer all the questions. My Mini was a Dwarf Pathfinder Sergant here on ReaperMini. The primer is Rust-Oleum. I only got this primer because it says for metal. And some of the primers, as you guys mentioned, only work on metal or don't work on metal. Its quick-easy topcoat. And, I guess I didn't read the directions right. It said it sets in ten to fifteen minutes. But the actual wording on it and painting on it is 1-2 hours. I waited roughly half an hour. So, I figure out my problem, thanks guys.

Edited by Duke of ABQ

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I almost always let my primer sit 12 hours before work, often prime in the evening and let it sit overnight. Just to make sure it's cured and bonded to the metal.

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Always give it 24 hours if you can. Since you said Home Depot I'm guessing you live in in the US. Go to Autozone pick up the sandable primers in the color you want there. They stick like a champ, usable in higher humidity, and at 6 bucks the price is right.

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Indeed. Sounds like the time was the issue. If the directions say 1-2 hours, I'd water on the 3-4 hour mark to be absolutely sure. Let us know how it turns out the next time!

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