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*sigh* Guess it is may then...


zedin
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I've never intentionally eaten horse but I'm almost certain that I have in some sort of meat product. I'd be perfectly fine with eating it as long as I knew what it was. The real issue of course with the horse meat scandal are the medications used which aren't cleared for human consumption, traces of tranquiliser are still being found in products as of last week.

 

 

Venison is ok, not terribly exciting. Pigeon is also alright, had it a few times including once when one flew into the kitchen window and broke it's neck.

Once had ostrich. Was a bit like tough lamb.

Edited by Nocturne
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if they have the big models on display at the con, so i can get a GOOD look at them, then i'll be able to wait patiently until May. I am DYING to get my hands on Nethy, Kaly, and Big C in person!!

 

We'll be needing pictures if this occurs.

And you'll have a convenient Sir Forscale in your pocket for any such pictures, right??

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There are painted versions posted up for the big three, so we should be able to see those in person, at least, in the display cases. I just need to remember to pack an extra suitcase, since I am picking up my vampire, paints and cases, plus bombshell babes, plus RBG, plus whatever else makes me go ooooooh shiny!

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Horse meat is delicious! Cut me off a slice. I like it thin, almost transparent.

I've heard that to be the case many times, with people saying it's similar to venison. I really want to try it before I die, but in the US we have these weird taboos against eating certain animals that other cultures don't seem to have. I'd also eventually like to try dog, cat, pigeon, dove, guinea pig, and armadillo. In fact, if it's meat and it isn't endangered, I want to try it at least once. It's as simple as that.

 

thing with dog is IMHO we have an implied social contract with them :)

 

 

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There will always be people unhappy with how things go, especially with something as tenuous as a Kickstarter. Given that the scope of Reaper's KS success was far greater than the funding level (100x greater), a month or two late in shipping for some is hardly unexpected. I don't have my figures yet, and I am certainly disappointed I'm not playing with them now. But it simply isn't worth throwing a fit, they ARE shipping them out.

 

 

What sort of gaming do you do? I plan to use mine for RPGs, and Kaladrax (the biggest mammer jammer of the lot) looks fit to take up 1/3 to 1/2 of our hex real estate. That's big, but I figure it works because he ought to be a centerpiece fight anyway. But if you're looking at wargaming, yeah, he might be a skinch too large to be especially useful.

 

Historical gaming (obviously not for the Bones) and skirmish games are what I prefer in either 15mm or 25mm; games like Mordheim (I've been told to check out SAGA, too) are what I plan on using the Bones I get for. A dragon as big as these (while fantastic) would require an entire army to kill by any rules I use.

Edited by warc3
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Historical gaming (obviously not for the Bones)

So, as an aside: Bones historicals, best idea ever or worst? Historical wargamers need hundreds of figs, which means the models should sell (at least at first), and they're often notoriously thrifty, so they'd appreciate inexpensive Bones. Plus, cutting down the weight of full armies from tens and hundreds of pounds to a third of that should also be a positive.

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Historical gaming (obviously not for the Bones)

So, as an aside: Bones historicals, best idea ever or worst? Historical wargamers need hundreds of figs, which means the models should sell (at least at first), and they're often notoriously thrifty, so they'd appreciate inexpensive Bones. Plus, cutting down the weight of full armies from tens and hundreds of pounds to a third of that should also be a positive.

Historical gamers (and I do count myself among them) are notoriously both cheap and picky. If you do a period with bayonets like the Napoleonic period you will get complaints about bendy bayonets etc, That being said I think the potential to go historical with Bones is very good. I think you would have to pick your period very carefully to get started and you are definitely not talking about a small investment in molds. 20 years ago historical gamers, for the most part, were quite happy with 2-3 poses; Standing Firing, Kneeling Firing, Marching, March Attack,Skirmishing etc. Now they have gotten spoiled and want 3-4 variations for every position in part thanks to the reduced cost in plastic manufacturing. The Perry Brothers, Victrix and Wargames Factory have really pushed the envelope on plastics already.

 

Let's take a British Napoleonic battalion as an example. In general its going to take 24 - 48 miniatures to create this unit depending on the rules you use (the rules will tell you how many men each miniature actually represents, like 20:1 or 40:1 etc, Some rules just say a stand represents x number of men and to put 3-5 miniatures on the stand). From the gamer standpoint we like to identify the "command stand" which will require an officer, a drummer and two flag bearers and, for the real hardcore, an NCO with a pike staff. So we are already at five miniatures and of course I would like to see some variations in poses for all of those. Now I need my flank companies. On the right are the Grenadiers, on the left are the Lights (skirmishers). Although the miniatures for the two different types can be the same they have to be different from the center companies as they have "wings" on their shoulders. So I need at least 8 miniatures (4 for the grenadiers and 4 for the lights) to represent that with some variety in the 5 primary poses. The rest of the miniatures become the center companies and look much like my grenadiers and lights but without the "wings" on the shoulders. In short we are looking at a lot of molds just to make an napoleonic battalion (regardless of nationality). Perry and Wargames Factory get around this by making their minis multi-part so there can be a lot of assembly required. I don't think the napoleonic period would be profitable unless you go with a multi-part format, but some other periods like WWII which would require a lot less variation have some real potential.

Edited by Heisler
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A lot of historical gamers really pride themselves on putting on a good "table" at conventions and they want a crispness of detail that they may perceive Bones to lack. These are usually the guys that have the money to do it though and are willing to spend some serious bucks on miniatures, terrain and painting if they can't do it themselves. Or even spend hundreds of hours scratchbuilding the center piece for a game that will only be used once.

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So, as an aside: Bones historicals, best idea ever or worst? Historical wargamers need hundreds of figs, which means the models should sell (at least at first), and they're often notoriously thrifty, so they'd appreciate inexpensive Bones. Plus, cutting down the weight of full armies from tens and hundreds of pounds to a third of that should also be a positive.

 

25mm scale could be interesting; 15mm would be difficult, I think, as you can buy a ton of 15mm figs for cheap (Old Glory). A lot of guys buy plastics already, so you'd have to make comparable quality figures that beat plastic prices. The difficulty lies in the market for historicals either being: a) very saturated, or b) unsatisfied, but niche. Category A are the big sellers like Romans, Napoleonics, etc. Category B are more specific and tough to sell, such as US Civil War/Revolutionary specific time period armies and/or unpopular gaming wars.

 

It's probably worth looking into with a real market analysis, but I don't see it being impossible. Start off small with Napoleonics or Romans/Gauls/Carthage and see if it sells. Everyone I know who does historicals is indifferent to the materials, so long as the figures are accurate and the figures somewhat varied.

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Ancients would also be a good shout, greek warriors especially would have some appeal to Reapers existing customer base.

That would be a good period as well, I think the issue is that the historical community already has at least four companies producing plastic miniatures already so you aren't coming into a market that has a void in it like Reaper was able to fill with the Bones line.

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I've never intentionally eaten horse but I'm almost certain that I have in some sort of meat product. I'd be perfectly fine with eating it as long as I knew what it was. The real issue of course with the horse meat scandal are the medications used which aren't cleared for human consumption, traces of tranquiliser are still being found in products as of last week.

 

Venison is ok, not terribly exciting. Pigeon is also alright, had it a few times including once when one flew into the kitchen window and broke it's neck.

Once had ostrich. Was a bit like tough lamb.

 

So by eating horse meat you get the added effect of dosing yourself with ketamine? I'd call that a plus, and you get plausible deniability for it too! "I swear, boss! I don't know why I tested positive for ketamine! Maybe it was those horse-burgers I was eating the other day."

 

As for venison, I eat it on a fairly regular basis. What with being a recreational outdoorsman who actually appreciates his catch for its food value rather than for trophy purposes and all that. I know that squab is pigeon, but as has been said it's typically served in high-end restaurants that are out of my price range for food experimentation. Though I do wonder how many of the people who go "Oooh! Squab sounds fancy/delicious!" and then order it actually know what it is. I figure those numbers would drop dramatically if people were actually told it was pigeon.

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So, as an aside: Bones historicals, best idea ever or worst? Historical wargamers need hundreds of figs, which means the models should sell (at least at first), and they're often notoriously thrifty, so they'd appreciate inexpensive Bones. Plus, cutting down the weight of full armies from tens and hundreds of pounds to a third of that should also be a positive.

 

25mm scale could be interesting; 15mm would be difficult, I think, as you can buy a ton of 15mm figs for cheap (Old Glory). A lot of guys buy plastics already, so you'd have to make comparable quality figures that beat plastic prices. The difficulty lies in the market for historicals either being: a) very saturated, or b) unsatisfied, but niche. Category A are the big sellers like Romans, Napoleonics, etc. Category B are more specific and tough to sell, such as US Civil War/Revolutionary specific time period armies and/or unpopular gaming wars.

 

It's probably worth looking into with a real market analysis, but I don't see it being impossible. Start off small with Napoleonics or Romans/Gauls/Carthage and see if it sells. Everyone I know who does historicals is indifferent to the materials, so long as the figures are accurate and the figures somewhat varied.

I think if I was going to enter the historical market I would target 15mm as the scale to go after. Old Glory 15mm (produced by 19th century) have gotten more expensive. ABs have been getting more expensive (neither as expensive as 28mm mind you)as well. You get more bang from your buck with the molds because you can get more figures in there. I think the top periods in 15mm are, from purely anecdotal evidence; WWII, Napoleonics, ACW and Ancients. ACW is very popular in 15mm and becoming more popular in 28mm with the advent of the Perry plastics. I might even target ACW as my first market for a number of reasons; played on both sides of the pond, only two combatants to make miniatures for, both sides are somewhat interchangeable for uniforms, uniforms were simply and (although to late now) we are rapidly approaching the 150th anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg.

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I've never intentionally eaten horse but I'm almost certain that I have in some sort of meat product. I'd be perfectly fine with eating it as long as I knew what it was. The real issue of course with the horse meat scandal are the medications used which aren't cleared for human consumption, traces of tranquiliser are still being found in products as of last week.

 

Venison is ok, not terribly exciting. Pigeon is also alright, had it a few times including once when one flew into the kitchen window and broke it's neck.

Once had ostrich. Was a bit like tough lamb.

 

So by eating horse meat you get the added effect of dosing yourself with ketamine? I'd call that a plus, and you get plausible deniability for it too! "I swear, boss! I don't know why I tested positive for ketamine! Maybe it was those horse-burgers I was eating the other day."

 

As for venison, I eat it on a fairly regular basis. What with being a recreational outdoorsman who actually appreciates his catch for its food value rather than for trophy purposes and all that. I know that squab is pigeon, but as has been said it's typically served in high-end restaurants that are out of my price range for food experimentation. Though I do wonder how many of the people who go "Oooh! Squab sounds fancy/delicious!" and then order it actually know what it is. I figure those numbers would drop dramatically if people were actually told it was pigeon.

 

Squab is (for me) generally any fowl caught and served near the seaside. Pigeon, sandpiper, seagull... if it flies and I eat it, it's squab.

-DD

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