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lizardbrain
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Another good system with mechanics that supports RP is Tenra Bansho Zero. The DM is responsible for the NPCs and such but the players (& DM) reward good RP with a mechanical reward which boosts the Character's ability to do things later in the game. The hardest part we have found is remembering to reward each other, but we are playing via the net it would be easier in person.

 

As to RP, I always expect some RP to go with a roll. If you cannot at least provide a description of what your character is saying there will not be a roll made. No I don't expect an awesome speech, the fighter's player doesn't need an amazing strength to portray his character so I don't expect the player to need an amazing charisma to portray his character should that be the case either.

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I got harassed in gym class until I out leg pressed the linebackers on the nautilus.. Soccer + 100 mile bike rides + mile swim in BSA..

I got harassed in gym class until I choke-slammed my tormentor into the wall because he finally got a bit too far under my skin one day. He thought my "scrawny" build was a lack of muscle, when the reality is that I was a farm boy and was all lean, practical muscle. It surprised the crap out of all the jocks and got them off my back for the rest of high school.

 

As for my minis, I'm hoping to use them to play Pathfinder. But my luck hasn't been good in finding a local group. The one I did find last year has practically fallen apart 3 times now. Which is weird because everyone in the group, save myself currently, is all a part of the same group of SCA fighters and they meet weekly for that. But we can't even get a game together every other week for Pathfinder. Haven't had a game since the middle of February, and we had only just started playing in January after not playing through the end of last summer and all of last fall.

Edited by Unruly
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I'd never penalize my players for an unconvincing speech any more than I'd penalize them for being unable to actually cast Fireball.

You don't need to be able to cast it - but you do need to be able to select the right spell, place the fireball in the right square, etc. There is a lot of player skill involved in the spell rules, combat rules (positioning, attack selection, etc) and other mechanical elements. I don't see why non-combat interaction should require less. As GM I don't need Shakespearean oratory, but I do need to know what you are trying to say, not just "I roll Diplomacy".

 

Oh for sure. You have to tell me what you're doing, but you don't have to do it yourself. "I roll Diplomacy" is more like just saying "I cast a spell" to me. Sure, okay, you can do that, but what are you actually trying to accomplish with that?

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I agree with the points about not penalizing "bad role-play", unless it is warranted (sometimes players may flub, and working those in to a check can be useful). As I mentioned in my last post, it is more the no-effort "I roll diplomacy" that gets penalized when it comes to those non-combat skill checks. And even then, admittedly, I use a sliding scale for my home campaign group. I recognize that not all my players are the same, and what is a great effort from one player is not the same as another. If you consistently demonstrate to me that you are an above average player, then you are going to have a harder time earning that full +2 bonus. It's only going to be those moments when you bring your "A-game" to the role-playing. In contrast, if I can get the shy, reserved player to actually talk to me when I'm the role of the shopkeeper and carry on any sort of in-character conversation, that's going to net them a bonus on their roll.

 

I want more than an average effort FOR YOU.

 

~v

Edited by Shakandara
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I hope this doesn't start a big argument, but I don't understand people who play a role-playing game, saying that role-playing is too hard, so why try. Ultimately if it works for you and you are having fun, I don't want to take it away from you.

 

But still I don't understand.

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I hope this doesn't start a big argument, but I don't understand people who play a role-playing game, saying that role-playing is too hard, so why try. Ultimately if it works for you and you are having fun, I don't want to take it away from you.

 

But still I don't understand.

People have different definitions of roleplaying. You might say someone isn't roleplaying, while they believe they are.

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I hope this doesn't start a big argument, but I don't understand people who play a role-playing game, saying that role-playing is too hard, so why try. Ultimately if it works for you and you are having fun, I don't want to take it away from you.

 

But still I don't understand.

People have different definitions of roleplaying. You might say someone isn't roleplaying, while they believe they are.

 

 

I suppose that's true. Strictly speaking, saying, "I stab him with my sword" is playing a role. You don't necessarily need to relay your character's speech word for word.
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I hope this doesn't start a big argument, but I don't understand people who play a role-playing game, saying that role-playing is too hard, so why try. Ultimately if it works for you and you are having fun, I don't want to take it away from you.

 

But still I don't understand.

People have different definitions of roleplaying. You might say someone isn't roleplaying, while they believe they are.

 

I suppose that's true. Strictly speaking, saying, "I stab him with my sword" is playing a role. You don't necessarily need to relay your character's speech word for word.

Going by my definition, moving to square A instead of square B on a battle map is roleplaying, depending on why you made that choice. And with that definition, you can't really know if someone is roleplaying or not, given the lack of psychic powers needed to determine those things. But even given that lack, I have the feeling that often when people are talking in 1st person, they really aren't playing the role. You can talk in first person all day without giving a single thought to having those words be in character.

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Another good system with mechanics that supports RP is Tenra Bansho Zero. The DM is responsible for the NPCs and such but the players (& DM) reward good RP with a mechanical reward which boosts the Character's ability to do things later in the game. The hardest part we have found is remembering to reward each other, but we are playing via the net it would be easier in person.

 

As to RP, I always expect some RP to go with a roll. If you cannot at least provide a description of what your character is saying there will not be a roll made. No I don't expect an awesome speech, the fighter's player doesn't need an amazing strength to portray his character so I don't expect the player to need an amazing charisma to portray his character should that be the case either.

That's how I do it, yup. You don't need to be able to do the stuff, but you need to be able to say what it is you are trying to do.The combat rules in tactical-heavy games like 3e & 4e D&D work that way anyway, but other skills like Diplomacy or Thievery can be a bit iffy. BTW I dislike some modern adventures where they say "There's a Trap - Disarm DC 20" but give no indication of how the trap works or how it might be disarmed. If no one can visualise what is happening it can really harm immersion IME.

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Hmm, I've never encountered anyone who refused to even try to roleplay. I'm sure they exist, but it doesn't make much sense to me either.

I have seen posters on eg rpgnet for whom apparently 'role playing' is an entirely internal-focused activity, it relates to their state of mind but has nothing to do with interactions with the GM or the other players at the table. Some of these people resent the idea they should have to interact with the GM/other players beyond the barest mechanical inputs.

That's fine if you're playing a solo CRPG, but if you're going to do that at my table, you're not bringing me anything I enjoy, so why would I want to play with you? The rpgnetter answer is either "That's what friends are for" (ok, I guess, if you're a good friend) or alternatively that I'm a bad person for asking the question, I'm discriminating against the socially challenged, etc.

Obviously I dislike the second response, I don't think it's fair on me or others - we put a lot into the game, we deserve as much from you as you do from us. So make an effort. >:)

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Some people just enjoy playing wargames with a storyline. I've known people who refused to ever say anything in character because it was "silly". I've also known people who love to play the part and are hardly interested in the actual combat aspects, save how it adds to the overall story. I'm pretty smack in the middle of the two extremes, with some variance depending on what system I'm playing.

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