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Arutema

Quick question RE: MSP brush-on primer

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Due to logistical problems with spray primer, I'm switching to MSP brush-on.

 

Should I thin down the primer before use as I would paints, or use it as-is?

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Depending on my mood I either use it very slightly thinned (ie 4 or 5 parts primer to water) or use a damp brush to put it on with.... both work for me, but expert painters might have other opinions

 

ED: opps, i was beat to the post

Edited by kay13

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"Yes" to thin down, or, "Yes" to as is? Or, are you trying to say both are acceptable? Thanks.

Yes.

 

...I'm helping!

 

 

...okay, fine, long answer: Yes, you can use it thinned - some people do. Remember, it doesn't matter if the primer's on there very thinly and you can see through it, because the important part is having that "tooth" for the paint to grip on to.

 

Personally, I prefer to use my primer straight when I'm doing the Reaper Brush-On. Your Mileage May Vary.

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I find it goes on nice and smooth with just a damp brush, leaving no noticable loss of detail. still, and I am liking the white surface or painting.

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"Yes" to thin down, or, "Yes" to as is? Or, are you trying to say both are acceptable? Thanks.

Yes.

 

...I'm helping!

 

 

...okay, fine, long answer: Yes, you can use it thinned - some people do. Remember, it doesn't matter if the primer's on there very thinly and you can see through it, because the important part is having that "tooth" for the paint to grip on to.

 

Personally, I prefer to use my primer straight when I'm doing the Reaper Brush-On. Your Mileage May Vary.

 

I somewhat disagree. If the primer is too thin it won't hold as well and you'll rub off some paint\primer via just the paint process unless you're crazy amazing at not touching anything but a brush to the mini while painting it.

 

I thin mine down but not as much as I use to but I still put about 3 coats of the brush on primer down and the highest raised points still get some rub off. Something you can do to also help the primer stick better to metal is to bath the mini in vinegar for a minute or two. The vinegar bath will etch the metal some (making it dull) but it improves the surface to help the primer stick better.

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unless you're crazy amazing at not touching anything but a brush to the mini while painting it.

 

I wouldn't consider Blu-Tac'ing a mini to a pill bottle a crazy amazing skill. It's a lot easier on the hand, too.

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Even with a grip apparatus like that setting the mini on foam, brushing your skin against it and so on can cause things to come off. Skin is the worst part as the oils can mess with the paint but it's not the only thing that can rub paint off.

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If you paint lead miniatures, keep the vinegar far away. Acetic acid acts to oxidize lead into lead carbonate, which releases acetic acid, etc. And it doesn't seal the surface of the metal, so it can destroy the entire figure and other figures in the same air space.

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Even with a grip apparatus like that setting the mini on foam, brushing your skin against it and so on can cause things to come off. Skin is the worst part as the oils can mess with the paint but it's not the only thing that can rub paint off.

 

yeah, but I stick my minis on a 2 oz. bottle of craft paint and nothing touches the mini, ever. Only after the top coat is dry, then I remove it. I`ve had paint rub off on a wet blend, so I`ve learned my lesson. I guess I should consider myself crazy amazing at something :;):

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I paint while wearing nitrile gloves. My skin never touches the mini, so skin oils are not a problem.

 

Acid and metal minis bug me. I don't have a lot of experience with minis, but I worry when I hear about minis painters using oil paints, which are acidic*, rather than acrylics, which are alkaline. Acids react very badly with lead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Linoleic and linolenic acid from linseed oil. It's why canvas has to be primed with something impermeable to oil, either rabbitskin glue (traditional, old style) or acrylic gesso (modern, new style), before painting. Otherwise the oil rots the canvas.

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learn something new every day. I thought canvases had to be primed to give a smoother surface only. Fortunatley, most minis contain zero lead. But yeah, I have this notion to keep acids as far from my minis as possible

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Fortunatley, most minis contain zero lead. But yeah, I have this notion to keep acids as far from my minis as possible

 

Less true than you might think, though possibly more true for US-manufactured minis than elsewhere. Until GW went all (or nearly all?) polymers, their figures had lead. Most metal historicals (last I looked, anyway) are high lead content figures, and quite a few boutique companies use alloys containing lead as well.

 

As it happens, metallic lead is very safe, so there's not much reason to avoid it and many companies don't. Lead salts (like lead carbonate) have much higher bioavailability.

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