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More stupid newbie questions! Paint remover?

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I'm a fan of the fingernail scrape, if it's really dried on a soak in some warm water.

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I use a wet palette and throw away the parchment paper after painting. Parchment is cheap.

 

When I used a well palette, I cleaned pretty regularly, because the paint buildup makes judging colors more challenging, and the paint starts to add texture to the palette, which I don't like. That's really easy to do with a cheap porcelain palette, not so much with the even cheaper plastic well palettes or random other plastic containers.

 

If you do clean your palette, Simple Green or Pinesol should work fine.

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I've encountered two types of plastic palettes - the $.50 kind resists the warm water + fingernail method of cleaning, but the $2 version cleans just fine. Getting a welled porcelain palette is the way to go however. They clean more easily than either plastic kind, won't scratch, etc. I also like them because they're heavy.

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I use a wet palette and throw away the parchment paper after painting. Parchment is cheap.

 

When I used a well palette, I cleaned pretty regularly, because the paint buildup makes judging colors more challenging, and the paint starts to add texture to the palette, which I don't like. That's really easy to do with a cheap porcelain palette, not so much with the even cheaper plastic well palettes or random other plastic containers.

 

If you do clean your palette, Simple Green or Pinesol should work fine.

That paint buildup is what I'm worried about. I keep picking new spots in my plastic container to put the fresh paint, because I'm afraid I won't be able to see the color properly that I'm using to know what it looks like if it's on top of dried paint. Or if I put it on top of dried paint of the same color, I won't be able to tell how much is the new, wet stuff, and how much is the dried, old stuff.

 

I keep seeing the phrase "wet palette" around, but I have no idea what that means.

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That's the one I use. But it works only a little better than a disposable foam plate, a folded paper towel, and baker's parchment. (Commonly referred to as a "ghetto wet palette" around here.)

 

It keeps your paint out and at a constant consistency while you're painting (for hours if need be).

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I go half way in between. I use a white tile like you get in the hardware store. Real cheep and cleans off easy, but does not have wells. It works.

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Porcelain palettes are the best of the welled palettes and clean up very easily. You can use an abrasive pad on them with no fear of scratches if you're in a hurry. One type I've seen used has small wells compared to the standard ones used by 2D artists, and I think that would be an advantage if you don't like to waste paint or have limited space. I'm not sure who sells that type, however, though I think I read it was actually a type of lab equipment.

 

However, I now use a wet palette for almost everything, and prefer it to welled palettes. Paint can last days, perhaps much longer, and I think you can extend usability by putting it in the refrigerator between sessions, though I haven't gone to that extreme (yet). I suggest you try a homemade version and see if you like it. Cleanup is as easy as throwing away the paper, or you can clean it off with a bit of care if you prefer. I waste much less paint with the wet palette than I did with a welled one.

 

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At ReaperCon last weekend, I noticed there was a fairly even split between dry and wet palettes, so it comes down to personal preference. You can pick up both kinds of welled palettes at most art stores - the 11 well kind with the big wells and the small welled kind that comes in various sizes. Paint dries more slowly in the smaller wells (less surface area for evaporation), but obviously, they hold less paint (which is probably not an issue in most cases). I like my large-welled palette, but I haven't had a change to try a small-welled one, and I haven't been able to give a wet palette a fair test yet.

 

tl;dr: there is no correct answer. use whichever one you like the most

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Followup question: I looked for Simple Green in the store today, and it wasn't there. I was in a major American supermarket that has two large aisles of various cleaning supplies, so I figured any commonly available product would be there. What types of stores usually sell it, and where would it be?

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Followup question: I looked for Simple Green in the store today, and it wasn't there. I was in a major American supermarket that has two large aisles of various cleaning supplies, so I figured any commonly available product would be there. What types of stores usually sell it, and where would it be?

Hardware stores and auto supply stores.

 

I can't recall if I spotted any in my grocery store because I'd already picked some up from Ace Hardware. Just look in cleaning supplies.

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Hardware stores seem to be the best bet, At least here in Canada. I have never seen it in a grocery store, even the big ones

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If you can't find Simple Green in the household cleaning aisle, try the automotive and hardware aisles. Target and Walmart used to keep it in automotive, and I believe they still do, but I haven't needed any recently. I believe it was next to the SuperClean and Purple Power at Walmart, both also good stripping agents I've read, but I don't think they are safe on skin.

 

I've never used gloves with SG, but I probably would if I used it more often. One bottle of SG can last a long time since it is reusable. Pour it in a jar with a lid and it lasts for ages as a stripping agent.

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