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somegeek

Orc Archer - ink/highlights for bow?

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Newb inquiry incoming...

 

The bow on this archer(from a Dungeon Command set) has some texture to it which I'd like to bring out. Should I use a dark ink wash and/or lighter highlights? At one point I almost stopped putting layers on the bow as the white still showing through gave it a nice texture but then I figured it'd be best to put on a solid base layer then work on adding highlights.

 

Any input appreciated. :)

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Edited by somegeek

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So far, so good! Like what you've got going on there.

 

A wash would certainly work. You'll likely find that you'll have to go back and touch up with your base coat, since it'll end up tinting the whole thing a bit, but it'll definitely work. From that point, you could either drybrush a lighter colour on top to really make the details pop, or layer in some highlights.

 

I'd bet you could also get away with doing a second, darker base coat and drybrushing or layering up a set of highlights from there. Or painting down into the more recessed areas, if you've got a steady hand.

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For wood, I like to do a basecoat, drybrush on some highlights, then wash everything with either a dark ink or thinned paint. Doing the wash last tones down strong highlights and will join the colours together. If it's too blended afterwards you can always do another light drybrush to pump up the contrast.

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Hopefully one of our resident Great And Wise Art Gurus will chime in here, but I believe that the big difference is that inks have a smaller pigment size and much higher pigment content than paints do.

 

Both inks and paints can be mixed into a wash, using straight water or any of a number of additive mixes that you can find, without a problem. Inks tend to be more saturated versions of a colour, and they seem (to me at least) to settle into the cracks a bit better, but that could well just be perspective.

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Inks are generally made with dyes, or very fine pigment which is mixed into a solvent of some kind. The colour tends to be much more intense, which is why I like it for shading and filling in fine relief details. You have to watch that you don't use too much, or you can wreck your previous work , but once you get an idea of the right water:ink ratio it works very well. A potential downside is that a lot of inks will have a slight sheen when dry, but you can always kill that with a matte finish.

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