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Willen

WIP Dancer Girl

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So, I couldn't find a champagne cork (the wife volunteered to drink one and get me the cork, however), so I had to make do with a regular cork. I cut down the semi-barrel from it, used the Dremel to sand, file down, etc.

 

I decided I wanted it to be like a regular barrel cut in half, not the platform as seen above. So I scored the top leaving a lip. I also used the knife to score down the division of the planks and some texture. It doesn't really show up, but will probably pop with some ink (and of course, paint, later). If it isn't enough, I will just make them deeper.

 

Pics:

 

IMG_20130509_220826_021.jpg

 

IMG_20130509_220905_345.jpg

 

I still need to do the iron band near the "middle" (in this half barrel, it would be near the floor) and near the top. I will do that tomorrow probably.

 

What do you think?

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Progress!! Sort of...

 

Yesterday I got to work on the half barrel. I shaped it up a bit more, roughing up the "planks", and dividing them more. This is a miniature, and without exaggeration our eyes do not catch enough detail. This is what happened:

 

IMG_20130511_133848_807.jpg

 

As you see, the cork "disintegrates". It is near unsandable, and even with sharp blades it breaks down. My first solution was to try to smooth it out with a putty you can sand (I have milliput, stardard white box with red letters), with was promising...

 

IMG_20130511_141724_450.jpg

 

The rough details and small fleece-like borders were still there so, confident, I attacked with sandpaper and file. The layer of milliput was too thin to make a big difference on the previous results :( It improved thou, at least a bit. If I use a thicker coat of putty I might as well just sculp the damn thing (at this point, it would've also been faster).

 

Anyway, last night I gave it a coat of acrylic gesso (because I thought, I have sandable Rustoleom primer, and will shoot it with that on Sunday and try to smooth it our again, but odds are that the cork will absorb too much of the primer, so best to insulate it first with gesso). I worked it some more first with my finest files and the result is semi-decent.

 

Anyway, I need help. I test-fitted the dancer while re-filing the roughness I missed and was evident after priming, and realized the best position is this:

 

IMG_20130512_104327_613.jpgIMG_20130512_104337_888.jpg

 

(you can also see the barrel after the gesso and filing, and why I believe it is still rough).

 

My problem: basically no pining area :( Plus she is metal, so a gluing will be a mess, it will be a top-heavy piece :(((

 

What can I do? The smallest drill bit I have (and it is very very small) cannot go into her feet more than a millimeter.

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Well, pretty cool ideas here. A bit of an idea for the Top-Heavy correction thing. Does your country have a Small but Heavy Metal Coin in its Currency? Gluing 1 or 2 to the bottom of a Mini or its base can help it stand upright better. I've sacrificed more than a few American Nickles to the "This Thing Needs to Stand Upright" Fund:P

 

Small drill bits are hard to find nearly anywhere. As long as you not Mailing it somewhere and are careful with it, Gluing should be enough.

 

GF

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Washers could also work to weigh it down. You might even want to mount the barrel on a larger base, depending on what you will be using her for. If it is a display piece you could place her on a pretty large base. Even for a game setting like a tavern dancer she could get away with a larger base, maybe a lid off a pill bottle or spice container or something similar.

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Thanks for the comments. I am thinking of having it all sit in a larger base, like a woodboard floor, so gluing it down (the barrel to the base) should not be a problem. But a washer would surely help make it all more heavy and less prone to tipping on its own, well thought.

 

What I actually meant by "top-heavy" was that the metal mini is too heavy way too far upwards the oh-so-little gluing surface for the feet. So those little feet would have to support any "movement" or touch from the whole metal mini. I will try to glue it; I am afraid that as soon as I tilt it it will fall off :(

 

I am using epoxy putty for gluing, but it is not so good... what do you guys think about two thin wire pins, one per feet, to distribute the load? They won't be able to go far into the mini thou, I mean, almost superficial :(

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I'm not sure you'll be able to really pin that enough to make a difference, the points of contact look small enough that I'd worry about accidentally drilling all the way through. But that's just me. ^_^

 

Not sure how well it would work, but you might be able to glue the mini to a weight of some sort (washer, rock, etc.), then hollow out the top of the barrel to hide it. Might take a little Milliput to disguise things.

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ot sure how well it would work, but you might be able to glue the mini to a weight of some sort (washer, rock, etc.), then hollow out the top of the barrel to hide it. Might take a little Milliput to disguise things.

 

:blink: Great idea!! The cork is too porous (that is why I am afraid of just gluing it), but gluing it to a 5c coin and then disguising it might be better, with a good metal-metal glue!! Thanks!!

 

(I am confident I can re-sculpt the top with putty, but I am sad. It was looking good :upside: )

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If you're worried about adhesion and strength, I wouldn't use epoxy putty as an adhesive. Instead, I'd use regular epoxy glue.

 

I'm afraid I don't know what's available in Argentina, but here in the US, I now use mostly JB Kwik, which has been working quite well for me. Almost any five-minute-set epoxy should work, though.

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Oh, I use 10-minute epoxy glue for metal miniature gluing (did I say putty? Perhaps I was unclear, sorry, English is not my mother tongue). Might be useful to check if there are any quicker-set ones (no that I am aware, but should check at the hardware store).

 

A couple minutes is a lot of time for keeping it still if you cannot pin it or hold it easily (or lie it down). And if it moves at all it sets gummy (did that ever happen to you?). Frustrating :(

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You should be able to find a 5 minute epoxy glue, But before you glue it I suggest seeing if you can find a way to keep it held in place without sitting there holding it yourself. That way you can just leave it to cure without risk of moving it yourself, or the discomfort of holding still.

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I've seen 60 second epoxies, but in my limited experience, that amount of time is sometimes even worse; things can get pretty frantic. I'd both pin and do what ShadowRaven suggested. A couple of bags of rice can work fairly well to hold a figure in place while the glue sets.

 

No worries on the glue/putty issue. But they both exist and both are used in miniatures (and I've used epoxy putties as adhesives myself, which is how I know what I know), so I just wanted to be clear both for you and for others reading the thread.

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Hello everybody! It's not like I've been out... well, I've been. LOL. Just extremely busy this last month(s), business trips included.

 

I just re-arranged all the painting stuff, also cleaning some new Infinity minis I got (and I am enthusiastic about painting!). I also put together a mockup for my Here be Dragons entry:

 

IMG_20130715_113532_015.jpg

 

... but I am expecting some minis from Reaper to finish the scene. The base is part-way there, as you see, but I am enjoying drafting a story on a diorama again :)

 

Now, to out Dancer Girl!

 

I broke out my most expensive brush to date (finally!), put my fears aside and started working on her. Just a skin basecoat:

IMG_20130718_170556_918.jpg

 

I did three thin coats of flesh. My hands shaked, they need to be re-educated. It got frustrating losing so much control on my hands and pulse these years; but I kept lying to myself that doing a basecoat I could miss some boundaries. Hopefully I will get better again!

 

Then the eyes, because I wanted to look at her while painting. Also, because it was a good test to my pulse, grip, and the new brush tip:

 

I don't know if I can show you good pictures, but I am quite pleased with the result.

 

IMG_20130718_172611_020.jpgIMG_20130718_174659_604.jpgIMG_20130718_172728_423.jpg

 

Technique used is the famous "raccoon" technique, done here with a mahogany brown, and ivory for the "whites".

 

The leftover mahogany was used to sort of blackline the skin, to help me define blocks and shapes. I do a lot of that improptu stuff.

 

Cleaned up with the medium flesh I was using for the final layer of skin. Since I had ivory on my wet palette, I mixed a little bit of it into the flesh and touched up tips of nose, eyebrows, chin, tops of breasts, belly... general lighting of the flesh tone to enhance shapes. The middle picture above shows that; the light was nice enough to let me show you the initial work on breasts, belly and face.

 

Now my hands hurt, and my eyes are sore as well. I need to take a break, but next will be proper shadowing and highlighting of the skin. Plus lips; she needs lips to talk!

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So, I worked on the skirts today. I started with a layer of a camo-like yellow, then washed with flat yellow the "upper" parts of the skirt, selecting the areas to add volume. Then added more and more lemon yellow to the flat one, picking up on volumes and folds. Final highlights with pure lemon, lemon + white, and white.

 

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I am thinking about washing the undersides of the skirts with a sepia GM wash, to tie it more with the legs and give some depth; perhaps also underline the highlights with the wash. What do you think?

 

Sorry for the bad pics. I will put together a light box and take proper pictures of her soon.

Comments and criticism and welcome :)

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