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brisingre

Which bones am I missing?

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Hi all. Relatively short time lurker, first time poster.

I backed the Kickstarter for Vampire plus one of each optional add-on (including Orcpocalpyse).

I'm feeling like practicing painting a little bit before my big box gets here, so I have a question: What existing bones aren't in my pledge? I'm thinking about getting a few to practice on, and I'd like as many different minis in my collection as possible.

 

Thanks!

 

-Lou

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Just go to reapermini.com and look under Bones. The ones which aren't in multi-packs aren't in the KS. My favorite is Mr Squidface (aka the Bathalian). ::):

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It's easier to go in the reverse:

 

The Bones included in your pledge are the zombies, the skeletons, the goblins, the rats, and the kobolds. Basically just the undead and dungeon attack bits.

 

Everything else in the currently available 29 listings is fair game for practice without repetition.

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TBH the Dungeon Attack & Undead Horde figures are all quite good to have multiples of regardless. I'd (well, OK, I have) grab all 29 of the existing Bones.

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Yes, though appropriately sized for old school orcs. I tend to think of the two types as orcs and orogs or, if one prefers, orcs and uruk-hai.

 

Ironically, the larger Orcpocalypse orcs will outnumber my fodder orcs for a while because I'm trying to round up some terrain instead of filling out my low orc ranks. This pleases me, as my players brutally slew my super-cool NPC Big Orc upon immediate contact and I'm still rather bitter that Krogar will not get any fancy story.

 

Killed in the prime of life before his miniature even arrived. Quite sad.

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Leave the fancy story to the Friends and Family of Krogar (FaFoK), after they show up for an extended discussion of the D&D alignment system and the magic item economy -- or try to kill the group, which would definitely be less painful.

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Yes, though appropriately sized for old school orcs. I tend to think of the two types as orcs and orogs or, if one prefers, orcs and uruk-hai.

 

Ironically, the larger Orcpocalypse orcs will outnumber my fodder orcs for a while because I'm trying to round up some terrain instead of filling out my low orc ranks. This pleases me, as my players brutally slew my super-cool NPC Big Orc upon immediate contact and I'm still rather bitter that Krogar will not get any fancy story.

 

Killed in the prime of life before his miniature even arrived. Quite sad.

 

 

I feel your pain. It can be really emotionally draining as a DM when you pour all this effort into a villain or NPC and the players either promptly stick a sword in his gullet or bypass the character all together. I try not to get too excited about any one game element, because you just really don't know how your players are going to react during game play. It's been a huge boon to my DM soul playing with a whole party of brand new D&D players. Really, the whole group has never played before this campaign. It really keeps me on my toes. For example, the party has taken a goblin prisoner that they insist on dragging around with them to porter equipment. During the last battle, the goblin (who is tethered by rope to one of the PCs) ran away and was able to trip up the PC and drag him into a tree where he was knocked unconscious. I couldn't stop giggling. Experienced players would have slain the goblin after extracting any useful information and hired a porter that wouldn't run away. After playing for the better part of 30 years you come to expect or take for granted how experienced gamers roleplay. It's so much fun rediscovering all those old game devices you just can't use with old timers.

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Yes, though appropriately sized for old school orcs. I tend to think of the two types as orcs and orogs or, if one prefers, orcs and uruk-hai.

 

Ironically, the larger Orcpocalypse orcs will outnumber my fodder orcs for a while because I'm trying to round up some terrain instead of filling out my low orc ranks. This pleases me, as my players brutally slew my super-cool NPC Big Orc upon immediate contact and I'm still rather bitter that Krogar will not get any fancy story.

 

Killed in the prime of life before his miniature even arrived. Quite sad.

 

 

I feel your pain. It can be really emotionally draining as a DM when you pour all this effort into a villain or NPC and the players either promptly stick a sword in his gullet or bypass the character all together. I try not to get too excited about any one game element, because you just really don't know how your players are going to react during game play. It's been a huge boon to my DM soul playing with a whole party of brand new D&D players. Really, the whole group has never played before this campaign. It really keeps me on my toes. For example, the party has taken a goblin prisoner that they insist on dragging around with them to porter equipment. During the last battle, the goblin (who is tethered by rope to one of the PCs) ran away and was able to trip up the PC and drag him into a tree where he was knocked unconscious. I couldn't stop giggling. Experienced players would have slain the goblin after extracting any useful information and hired a porter that wouldn't run away. After playing for the better part of 30 years you come to expect or take for granted how experienced gamers roleplay. It's so much fun rediscovering all those old game devices you just can't use with old timers.

 

Krogar can easily return as a death knight anti-paladin of Gruumsh. He can give them his whole back story as he has them trapped in a cage being lowered into a gigantic stewpot.

 

My group has been playing for decades, but we often take and keep prisoners, goblin or otherwise. We are mostly of the opinion evil is generally just misunderstood, unless it is of an actual demonic bent. Is a bear evil? Depends on who you ask, most salmon would definitely have them in the evil category. We usually give monsters smart enough to surrender a chance to repent their evil ways. Sometimes we will turn them over to the local authorities, sometimes we will release them after a day or two, just long enough so that they cannot warn compatriots or sound any alarms. Usually intelligent creatures have enough self interest to play along, though we have been burned in the past. Especially by Drow, that almost always ends badly. We keep hoping for another Drizzt, it just hasn't happened yet.

 

One of the most epic adventures I ran was a long second edition campaign where the group led by a paladin decided to tame the Pomarj after a hill giantess surrendered and became the party cook. They ended up building a truly massive keep, spending decades of game time and more than a year of real time gathering and converting an eclectic population of hundreds and thousands of goblins, orcs, half-orcs, ogres, giants, centaurs, humans, dwarves, plus a smattering of gnolls, elves, orogs, bugbears, kobolds, and even an ancient green dragon. Of course the green dragon was mostly there because he was bemused by the whole concept, and was just waiting for the inevitable collapse. Still, he did help them out, and seemed to enjoy himself immensely. His job was chancellor of the exchequer, so he basically got to sit atop the kingdom's treasure, and dole out coin to those brave enough to come and ask for it. The kingdom was very frugal ::P:

 

A recent game I played in, we came across a group of goblins attacking a farm. We rescued the farmer, slew most of the goblins, but thanks to an entangle gave three of them a chance to surrender. Before we arrived, the goblins had set a barn ablaze, so I had my druid "geas" the goblins into servitude. We were way too low level to actually use that sort of magic, and we didn't have a cleric anyway (he had been eaten by an owlbear the day before), so I used a lot of chanting and a faerie fire spell to convince them they were compelled to stay until the farmer released them, which he would do when they rebuilt his barn. We promised to come back and check on them, and to make sure no more mishaps befell the farm. When we returned, the goblins had been released, but had stayed on because the farmer fed them and never whipped or ate them, so it was the best life they had ever known. The farmer said they worked harder than human hired hands, and had even started traveling to the village and interacting with the locals.

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Yes, though appropriately sized for old school orcs. I tend to think of the two types as orcs and orogs or, if one prefers, orcs and uruk-hai.

 

Ironically, the larger Orcpocalypse orcs will outnumber my fodder orcs for a while because I'm trying to round up some terrain instead of filling out my low orc ranks. This pleases me, as my players brutally slew my super-cool NPC Big Orc upon immediate contact and I'm still rather bitter that Krogar will not get any fancy story.

 

Killed in the prime of life before his miniature even arrived. Quite sad.

 

 

I feel your pain. It can be really emotionally draining as a DM when you pour all this effort into a villain or NPC and the players either promptly stick a sword in his gullet or bypass the character all together. I try not to get too excited about any one game element, because you just really don't know how your players are going to react during game play. It's been a huge boon to my DM soul playing with a whole party of brand new D&D players. Really, the whole group has never played before this campaign. It really keeps me on my toes. For example, the party has taken a goblin prisoner that they insist on dragging around with them to porter equipment. During the last battle, the goblin (who is tethered by rope to one of the PCs) ran away and was able to trip up the PC and drag him into a tree where he was knocked unconscious. I couldn't stop giggling. Experienced players would have slain the goblin after extracting any useful information and hired a porter that wouldn't run away. After playing for the better part of 30 years you come to expect or take for granted how experienced gamers roleplay. It's so much fun rediscovering all those old game devices you just can't use with old timers.

 

Yes, but on the other hand you can turn this against them also. Killing that Goblin leads to a Holy War aginst them by a tribe that saw that goblin as the chosen one.

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After playing for the better part of 30 years you come to expect or take for granted how experienced gamers roleplay. It's so much fun rediscovering all those old game devices you just can't use with old timers.

 

True, that. Of course, since you realize that there are certain patterns of behavior, you can plan for them and really trip up players who fall back on their "tried and true" tactics.

 

Like ttuckerman mentioned, perhaps some other goblins see the players murder their captive and proceeds to harass the party for the next several nights. The goblins likely know they can't win in a straight-up fight, so they'll use their advantages (night vision, hit and run, traps, etc.) to whittle away at the party. Even higher-level characters are suceptible to fatigue from lack of sleep, theft of belongings, traps which annoy or slow them down (if not actually damage them). I think it's important for the DM to "think outside the box" whenever players start getting too comfortable!

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