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dks

77094 Trista (the White Wolf): sculpt Pat Keith, paint D. Schubert

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Derek, she is awesome! Always a treat to see your point jobs.

 

Care to share the blonde hair recipe?

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She is beautiful. I like seeing your base covered with snow.

Your moderate masterpiece freehand is gently pleasing.

Warm light yellow and crisp light blue look sheer wonderful. ::):

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Thanks, everyone!

 

@buglips*the*goblin: I've added a "this is a metal mini" disclaimer, and removed the "Bones" tag from the topic overall. I can see how you would be expecting to see a painted Bone in this thread; sorry to disappoint / bait-and-switch. I think that most of the paint jobs (by Martin, Michael, et al.) on the "Bones exclusive" figures in the Gallery have been on metal masters rather than the actual plastic Bones. I haven't painted a Bone yet. If I do, I'll document the process.

 

@Sanael and @Baugi: Darklining ... my process varies. Usually it goes like this: I paint one part of the figure; I paint a dark shadow/line around that section where it meets an unpainted section, so the darklining has to be neat only on the "finished" side; then I paint the unpainted section carefully enough to leave a dark line behind. But often I find that the lining isn't dark enough, so I do paint thin dark lines between two otherwise finished sections. I also do that for the lines between fingers and toes. You can see how fine a brushstroke I can get, from the texture on her tabard. Making fine lines takes steady hands and proper paint consistency.

 

@CashWiley: Granny makes her broom from these clumps of dead grass foliage. :;):

Here's a head-shot detail (at about 10x size on the screen) so you can see the eyes & eyebrows better:

post-2358-0-03973000-1370031769.jpg

I think I used thinned Woodstain Brown (the shadow tone of the cool-browns Shield Brown triad) for her eyebrows. One trick about painting eyebrows is to choose a color similar to the hair and dark enough to read as an eyebrow (not just skin-shadow) but not so dark that it looks unnatural (unless that's what you want). The other trick is getting the right shape and right location for the expression you're trying to achieve. For reference, look at photographs, illustrations, comic books, real people, etc. When Frank Cho draws female characters, for example, the eyebrows have a distinctively angled shape.

 

@JeffyBaby: The "snow" is putty and paint: Sky Blue, with Deep Twilight shading and Pure White highlighting ... plus some Rosy Skin Highlight and Linen White for a hint of warmer sunlight shining on the snow.

This is an older figure on which I used a "snow basing" product, but I didn't like how big the granules were:

http://www.reapermini.com/Miniatures/schubert%20fafnir/sku-down/02152#detail/02152_Fafnir_ds

Since then, I've used the putty-and-paint technique to simulate snow.

 

@Loim: Yeah, let's see her as a redhead!

 

@Citrine: Her blonde hair started with paints that are labeled as skin tones -- Golden Highlight, with wet-blended shadows of Tanned Shadow and Dark Highlight, plus some Brown Liner in the darkest shadows -- and then up through layered highlights of Creamy Ivory, Linen White, and Pure White. I use Reaper's "skin" colors (low-saturation browns with varying degrees of yellow or red) for lots on non-skin items on miniatures: hair, leather, soil, stone, NMM, eye whites, etc.

 

For now,

Derek

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Wow, magnified most minis look worse. Your face is even more impressive close up, we can really see the incredible work you do with the details, she is just beautiful.

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Thanks, everyone!

 

@buglips*the*goblin: I've added a "this is a metal mini" disclaimer, and removed the "Bones" tag from the topic overall. I can see how you would be expecting to see a painted Bone in this thread; sorry to disappoint / bait-and-switch. I think that most of the paint jobs (by Martin, Michael, et al.) on the "Bones exclusive" figures in the Gallery have been on metal masters rather than the actual plastic Bones. I haven't painted a Bone yet. If I do, I'll document the process.

 

 

 

 

Actually, it's because most of the paint jobs have been on the masters that I was disappointed. I'd like to see more awesome work done with the same item I'm going to have in-hand, something that really shows what a Bones can be. I just don't think we're seeing enough of that kind of love for the line, it's almost always a top tier job on the metal master.

 

But I'm not getting the metal master. Or even a metal version. And if the item is exclusive to the plastic line, and nearly all painted examples are on the metal versions . . . well, I'm not saying it's intentional but it is kind of starting to feel like the top end painters are avoiding the Bones versions in favour of the metal shots.

 

Again, not explicitly saying that's the case. It could be entirely coincidental or merely a factor of availability (like having the master in-hand while the Bones molds were being tooled). I'm just pointing out that, if somebody was of a mind to do so, they could draw that conclusion and infer that what the rest of us will be able to get our hands on will be the lesser of the two.

 

Personally, I lean towards the mostly coincidence/it was on-hand earlier camp. But the poor Bones line gets a lot of flak for being lesser quality, and I don't agree that it is, and masters over bones for the painted examples sort of undermines my argument that Bones really are nice. But a couple of nice Bones versions of the man-sized minis by you, Martin, maybe Anne if she's got the time? Now that would go a huge way towards dispelling the myth that what we're getting are the cheapo knock-offs of what you got to play with, where "it's almost always the metal master" helps reinforce it.

 

It's pretty definitive when I can point to something like that and say "look at the ace job Derek did on this actual Bones piece, same as you've got, and look what we can strive for". I just want to see more Bones-love, is all. Especially if it's exclusive to that line. I mean, this lady here is gorgeous. You knocked it out of the park, no question. And if all else was equal but underneath that paint was the same pretty plastic girly coming in the Kickstarter pack then it's this whole extra level of amazing - and it just might make some people who got their Bones and looked at them squirrelly rethink their position.

 

So I kinda have half a complaint here, but really 90% of me just wants to enlist your aid so my job of converting people to the Love of Bones is easier. 'Cause I'm out there, every day, preaching the word. I will not tire, flag, or fail until every man, woman, and child on the face of this green earth gets to know the peerless pleasure of painting plastic people. I'm like Kwai Chang Caine, wandering the world with a sack full of Bones.

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Actually, it's because most of the paint jobs have been on the masters that I was disappointed. I'd like to see more awesome work done with the same item I'm going to have in-hand, something that really shows what a Bones can be. I just don't think we're seeing enough of that kind of love for the line, it's almost always a top tier job on the metal master.

 

But I'm not getting the metal master. Or even a metal version. And if the item is exclusive to the plastic line, and nearly all painted examples are on the metal versions . . . well, I'm not saying it's intentional but it is kind of starting to feel like the top end painters are avoiding the Bones versions in favour of the metal shots.

I think you'll find a lot of Martin's recent finished works are on metal masters for the metal lines as well and even there the quality of the master is superior.

 

When I look in the Bones gallery at the moment nearly every painted example is done by a community member, and there are some quality finishes (mine not included), so I don't think Reaper is giving a false impression here.

 

Though yes seeing the Bones version of a model painted by one of Reaper's pros would be good for the general quality debate, though truth is I feel Adrift burried that argument.

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It's not that the community hasn't produced nice work, and Adrift's example went a long way, but there is the impression of a divide when "this is the new Bones figure we're making" is almost always followed with "and here's a painted example of the metal master".

 

It's a user-end inference, to be sure, but you must see how that can easily be misconstrued that Reaper is purposely avoiding using the Bones and instead showing off the job on the masters. Now I don't personally believe that's the case, but what I am saying is that I can definitely see how somebody could make the argument that it looks that way. And even if this is unintentional, even if it is entirely coincidental, I don't think allowing for that inference is overall a good thing - and that it's a lot better to completely disarm the issue by using more actual Bones as painted high end examples. Because then there's zero argument to be made at all.

 

In sum, I believe it is always best when a painted example is shown off that is actually the product being sold. Then there can't be even the slightest allowance for complaint that what you see isn't what you will get. And it's because I love Reaper so much that I don't want to give any of the barbarian hordes out there the chance to use that as an excuse and gabble on about how they're being deceptive or some silliness.

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I think I used thinned Woodstain Brown (the shadow tone of the cool-browns Shield Brown triad) for her eyebrows. One trick about painting eyebrows is to choose a color similar to the hair and dark enough to read as an eyebrow (not just skin-shadow) but not so dark that it looks unnatural (unless that's what you want). The other trick is getting the right shape and right location for the expression you're trying to achieve. For reference, look at photographs, illustrations, comic books, real people, etc. When Frank Cho draws female characters, for example, the eyebrows have a distinctively angled shape.

Thanks, I'll be trying that soon, I think. I just bought several trade book collections for some inspiration. Alex Ross *drool* Some good stuff in the AvX compilation and just about to crack the Opena/Kubert Avengers 1-6.

 

I've been a sucker for good art since I can remember, had an uncle who painted and I'd watch him for hours. So my delving into painting minis has meant many enjoyable hours of looking at phenomenal art from all kinds of sources...if only I could incorporate more of what I see into what I do!

 

And when that Brom KS book shows up...

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