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Randomness Challenge! Tangents Only Thread


Girot
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Plus, I have this impression that people in France don't care much for Americans. I haven't the foggiest idea where I got that from, or whether it's even true, but I don't know anyone from there to ask them about it.

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

 

My experience was that most French people got along just fine with Americans. (This was some years ago when I lived very close to the French border in what was then West Germany.) I should perhaps note that the French government had similar problems with the US to the problems it has now.

 

FWIW, in many surveys over the years, American tourists almost always come at or near the top of the list for "most polite" and "most friendly".

 

Learn a non-english language, then pretend to be from there.

 

When a friend hiked through Europe, he pretended he was from Spain (very fluent in Spanish). Granted, this did not help when he lost all of his stuff while tripping in the Black Forest. No, he didn't fall....

 

-Dave

 

 

Do what makes you feel good, but I wouldn't do that. I find that if someone takes an immediate dislike to me because I'm American, it shortens the time needed to find out that I don't need to care what they think. There's no point in trying to placate bigots.

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I've never had a problem any of the times I visited France. You be polite, attempt to speak the language (even if you butcher it) and have common courtesy, everything will go just fine. I didn't notice any different when I went to Paris, even with the reputation that Parisians have.

 

All of the people I know who had problems with the locals were jerks who had problems with the people back home too.

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Oddly enough, I've never heard a Canadian pronounce "about" like "aboot."

 

Generally it's been a little more like "abowt," with a sort of pursed-lip swallowing of the second part of the dipthong.

 

Still, gotta love a country where they give you little packets of vinegar instead of ketchup with your french fries. And your choice of two kinds of vinegar, too!

 

Also you sell scones at your Tim Hortons. I love that.

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the 'aboot' pronunciation comes from the east coast where they mix both flavours of gaelic and french liberally with their english before serving. The Screech probably doesn't help much either

 

also it depends on where you are. Out here most places serve ketchup, but they always have at least white vinegar as well if you want it

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RE: education---jeez you're all making me feel inadequate. I'm just now working through my associates degree in electronics engineering. On the other hand, I've got a Master's from the school of hard knocks, and in 20 years in the Navy I've visited/lived in almost all of Europe, parts of the middle East, parts of Africa, India, and roughly half the states in the U.S. , so that's not too shabby, IMO.

 

RE:various chocolatey sweets---samples of all such home-made goodies must be forwarded to the Chaos Wolf Research Center for Taste Testing post haste in order to determine the levels of wonderfulness, as well as to determine if there is too much of a good thing.

 

RE: the French---I've been there several times and not really noticed any particular level of antipathy. Although it should be noted that I make an effort NOT to be the stereotypical 'ugly American'. Just don't forget where you are and accidentally slip into speaking German because you know it better than French, this will NOT work out well for you....

 

@OneBoot---first off, I'm glad to hear that your grandmother is continuing to improve, awesome news! Now, lesson time:

If you do end up moving to France, just be polite, and learn the language. Those 2 things will carry you an amazing distance. As evidence:

 

My first real duty station in the Navy after all my training was complete was Gaeta, Italy. (It's a small town roughly halfway between Naples and Rome) Shortly after I arrived, I was walking through town looking for a particular shop that some of the guys on the ship had told me about. I stopped at an ice cream stand on the side of the road and asked the gentleman running it if I he knew where said shop was located in English. He just stood there and looked at me with a confused look on his face, so I pulled out my Italian-American dictionary and tried it again in Italian, butchering at least half of the words, I'm certain. He then responded, in English, that it was another two blocks down the road. I must have had a strange look on my face because he also told me that he wanted to see if I'd try it in Italian. He then told me that I'd probably have a much better time of things if I at least tried to learn the language and customs of my home away from home. I followed his advice, and although I never really achieved more than a second/third grade conversational level, I really did have a much better time than some of my shipmates who didn't make the effort. I even made a few friendships that have carried on to this day. Sadly, I've forgotten most of what I knew due to disuse, but that's not the point. Do your best to fit in to your new home, and you'll be rewarded.

 

 

In my-life-sucks news, my youngest stepson left today. He called us around an hour ago to let us know that he arrived safely and was in the care of his Aunt. So, while I'm upset that things worked out as they did, I'm glad that he arrived safely, and I hope that he finds what he's looking for.

 

 

RE: randomness---I just discovered that there had been talk in 1999 of making a sequel to Strange Brew.

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the 'aboot' pronunciation comes from the east coast where they mix both flavours of gaelic and french liberally with their english before serving. The Screech probably doesn't help much either

 

also it depends on where you are. Out here most places serve ketchup, but they always have at least white vinegar as well if you want it

 

We most definitely do not say "aboot".

 

Aboot you could understand. What we say can't qualify as actual words. Ab't maybe?

 

I remind you, sir, that this is the birthplace of the following full conversation:

 

Arn?

 

N'arn.

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I am given to understand that the main thing, when traveling in France, is to make an effort at speaking French. This counts for ALL English speakers. Act pleasantly surprised when the person speaks English. Many do, but you don't want to give the impression that you expect it.

 

Whatever you do, don't pretend to be Australian. Many towns will buy you a drink (See Buglips on war cemeteries), but when Ozzies misbehave they leave a lasting impression. Americans might get loud, but Ozzies get blind drunk, grope the waitress, and then puke in your lap.

 

I might also point out that most Ozzies who meet Americans are stunned at how polite they are. We are not a polite people.

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My youngest son's almost-first words were "thank you." He stunned a waitress at the age of one, piping it up when she placed a plate in front of his booster seat.

 

We didn't *train* him to say it. He just picked it up as what was done from us and older siblings.

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the 'aboot' pronunciation comes from the east coast where they mix both flavours of gaelic and french liberally with their english before serving. The Screech probably doesn't help much either

 

also it depends on where you are. Out here most places serve ketchup, but they always have at least white vinegar as well if you want it

 

We most definitely do not say "aboot".

 

Aboot you could understand. What we say can't qualify as actual words. Ab't maybe?

 

I remind you, sir, that this is the birthplace of the following full conversation:

 

Arn?

 

N'arn.

Whadd'yat?

 

 

Edit: The one bit of Newfie I know, and I screwed it up. :huh:

Edited by Last Knight
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the 'aboot' pronunciation comes from the east coast where they mix both flavours of gaelic and french liberally with their english before serving. The Screech probably doesn't help much either

 

also it depends on where you are. Out here most places serve ketchup, but they always have at least white vinegar as well if you want it

 

We most definitely do not say "aboot".

 

Aboot you could understand. What we say can't qualify as actual words. Ab't maybe?

 

I remind you, sir, that this is the birthplace of the following full conversation:

 

Arn?

 

N'arn.

 

well yes, but 'aboot' is the Anglicized version of a'bt. You know when you speak slowly because that idiot you voted off the island and sent to Ontario can't understand you anymore.

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I am given to understand that the main thing, when traveling in France, is to make an effort at speaking French. This counts for ALL English speakers. Act pleasantly surprised when the person speaks English. Many do, but you don't want to give the impression that you expect it.

 

Whatever you do, don't pretend to be Australian. Many towns will buy you a drink (See Buglips on war cemeteries), but when Ozzies misbehave they leave a lasting impression. Americans might get loud, but Ozzies get blind drunk, grope the waitress, and then puke in your lap.

 

I might also point out that most Ozzies who meet Americans are stunned at how polite they are. We are not a polite people.

 

Yes, well, we need some rowdy commonwealth folk to sic on people from time to time. And us lot on this island might be able to match you, the Canadians haven't had as long to civilize us. Also, many of us are Irish. If we're ever at RCon together we can split away from these normal folk and sneak of for some drinks and punches, see how long it takes to get arrested.

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