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Randomness Challenge! Tangents Only Thread

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Hey, I get called cute all the time. I stub my toe, make some squealing noises and I'm cute and adorable. Makes me want to smack him. But I'm also cute when I'm wearing a pretty dress. So it's all good ^_^

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I was just listening to some Nirvana, and then it hit me that In Utero, which some part of my brain still classifies as "new", is more than 20 years old.

That crackling/creaking sound you hear is coming from my old man arthritic joints.

Sun's out today. Mayhap it'll be a good day to sit on the porch in a rocker with a nice blanket.

I play games to get perpective.

Like, for example, the Beatles did a cover of "The Sheik of Araby" in 1962, maybe for fun, maybe to appeal to older audiences, I dunno.

"The Sheik of Araby" dates from 1926, so it eas certainly in living memory when they recorded it in 1962. In fact, it was 36 years old.

So the Beatles doing a cover of a pop hit from the Flapper Era, the Roaring Twenties, is like someone today doing a cover of a 1978 hit, "Stayin' Alive," say.

And we are considerably farther from the Beatles now than they were from Tin Pan Alley then.

I love weird perspectives.

There was a great Reddit thread about this sort of thing a while back. My favorite was that the fax machine was invented the same year that the first wagon left on the Oregon Trail.

Ooh, nice!

 

I liked that there were still woolly mammoths alive when the first pyramids were built in Egypt.

 

And that at the same time the pilgrims were landing at Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts, in Santa Fe, New Mexico you could stay in a hotel, eat at a restaurant, and buy Native American silver.

 

I already knew, that, though. I took a history of architecture class, and the teacher showed us simultaneous architecture of the Americas: In New England, log cabins and salt box houses; in Mexico, giant baroque cathedrals.

 

I read the fax/Oregon Trail factoid as the video game. I didn't realize it meant the actual Oregon Trail back in 1843! My mind is blown.

 

Some more from that link:

  • The last inmate to die by firing squad in the US did so on the same day Toy Story 3 came out.
  • Pablo Picasso died the year Pink Floyd released "Dark Side of the Moon" (1973)
  • Prisoners began arriving at Auschwitz only days after McDonald's was founded.
  • Coca-Cola is only 31 years younger than Italy.
  • Nintendo was founded in 1889 (same year Hitler is born and the Eiffel Tower is inaugurated and Van Gogh paints Starry Night) 
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Do you sometimes feel like disagreement is the sturdy framework of our friendship?  :lol:

 

Anyway, while there is a grain of truth (or wisdom) in calling out the bloat trend of modern fiction, my post does (or at least should) come with the caveat not to take the musings of two inebriated scribblers much more seriously than the technicolour ramblings of a smokey room filled with hippies.  Although I would pay real money to see you argue something like string theory with Tommy Chong.  Just sayin'.

 

Also, I'm pretty sure we probably stole the "400 pages is the proper length for a novel" from somebody but forgot who in the subsequent conversation.  On some level the conversation was less conversation and more skit.  "The 400 page book" instead of "The 2,000 year old man". 

 

 

If I agree, or if my disagreement isn't interesting enough to write about, I'll click (or not) Like and move on. It's only when I think I have something to say other than "What he said" that I'll write. (Exceptions allowed for, of course.) The result is a selection bias toward disagreement.

 

Well, plus I think we have different enough philosophies and styles that there really is a fair amount of disagreement.

 

But I see it as the kind of disagreement that would go well with a beer.  ^_^

 

As to string "theory"? I try not to argue religion. And until that hypothesis makes a falsifiable prediction,....

 

 

 

and an enormous amount of Danielle Steel. 

 

The latter's success confuses me, because having read more of her work than is probably healthy I have yet to find a story she's written where something happens.

lol. My mom holds the same opinion of her books. She would rather they were not sold and it rankles her to see it succeed given her low opinion of the book. She favors a few romance authors, but is heavily into murder/mystery, sic-fi, fantasy, sic-fantasy (Where do you think I discovered Andre Norton?)

 

I try not to get rankled any more, because it is what it is.  A person would go nuts trying to account for why terrible things succeed and good things fail.  There isn't a logical element involved.  All a person entering the shark tank can do is respect the job and the reader enough to bring their best, and then see what happens.  Take the work seriously, but don't take yourself seriously.  Learn, push boundaries, write the truth, and try to do better each time. 

 

Whether that leads to the flophouse or the mansion is out of a scribbler's hands.  I do tend to try and reject the notion of "not deserving success", though, because whatever my opinion of a work might be the only way to succeed is to sell copies - so the decision of who "deserves" success is made entirely by the audience pool everybody taps.  When writers start getting snooty about taste, it's as good as saying you don't respect the audience and that's a dangerous road to take. 

 

Stephanie Meyer earned her money, book by book at the register.  God only knows why, but that doesn't change the essential fact that she did.  People got something out of what she produced, and ultimately that's the objective of every scribbler.  There's a fine line between professional competition and falling into the trap of getting snooty and trying to prove how smart a writer is.  I'd sooner take a thousand Twilight novels than another self-indulgent tripe-trip down "look at me, I'm so clever" road.

 

I already know which of the two is more insufferable. 

 

 

I mostly dislike Pratchett's work (as noted above). This doesn't mean I think that he's a bad writer*; the number of people whose opinions I respect that love his stuff is too high for that to be supportable. He (and any number of other writers whose work or genre I dislike) is selling to a market that I am not a member of.

 

I have to say that I'm particularly amused (and not a little dismayed) by what the inclusion of Larry Correia (and others) on this year's Hugo ballot has done to a certain segment of SF&F fandom. He has unapproved opinions and a writing style that aims for sales (and succeeds), which must not be allowed to proliferate. Imagine how well that's going to work.  ^_^

 

* Though the English don't do irony or sarcasm well.

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XD cheese elemental! Someone do it, it'd be so awesome

That would be awesome. Especially if it could be put in a vignette with some other food based monsters. Like a water elemental painted to be a milk, juice or a cola elemental. Or a beholder as a rotting apple or orange. :upside:

Edited by MatrissaTheEnchantress
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XD cheese elemental! Someone do it, it'd be so awesome

That would be awesome. Especially if it could be put in a vignette with some other food based monsters. Like a water elemental painted to be a milk, juice or a cola elemental. Or a beholder as a rotting apple or orange. :upside:

 

or surrounded by mouselings...

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That's why there's an "Improved tax evasion" feat :P

Nah. That would be Improved Tax Avoidance.

 

An accountant friend of mine once told me that while tax evasion was illegal, tax avoidance was his primary purpose in life. :upside:

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BUGLIPS! WORLD'S BIGGEST LUTEFISK!!!!

 

:blink:

 

My god... you may have invented a tourist trap for Minnesotans

 

 

No, under no circumstances. Minnesotans know what lutefisk is.

 

Which might be an argument for the accuracy of the comparison.

 

Shudder.

 

 

I was just listening to some Nirvana, and then it hit me that In Utero, which some part of my brain still classifies as "new", is more than 20 years old.

 

That crackling/creaking sound you hear is coming from my old man arthritic joints.

 

Sun's out today. Mayhap it'll be a good day to sit on the porch in a rocker with a nice blanket.

I play games to get perpective.

 

Like, for example, the Beatles did a cover of "The Sheik of Araby" in 1962, maybe for fun, maybe to appeal to older audiences, I dunno.

 

"The Sheik of Araby" dates from 1926, so it eas certainly in living memory when they recorded it in 1962. In fact, it was 36 years old.

 

So the Beatles doing a cover of a pop hit from the Flapper Era, the Roaring Twenties, is like someone today doing a cover of a 1978 hit, "Stayin' Alive," say.

 

And we are considerably farther from the Beatles now than they were from Tin Pan Alley then.

 

I love weird perspectives.

 

 

When I was my son's age, the end of WWII was less than thirty years in the past. It felt like forever ago to me when I was reading WWII history (which was and is enjoyable for me).

 

That same distance in time from now, US participation in the Vietnam war had been over for more than a decade.

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See my introduction was more Andre Norton (Sci-fi, fantasy and Sci-fantasy). Which then led to some Anne McCaffery and a few others. Andre Norton though was the one who wrote the books I enjoyed the most though. I still like her books a great deal, especially her Witch World series

I've had others recommend Norton, but I downloaded the first Witch World novel as an audio book (my primary method of "reading" these days) and couldn't finish it. After he went through the portal it just didn't capture my attention. Maybe I should try actually reading it - sometimes a book just doesn't work when read aloud. Also the narrator can make a huge difference.

 

Aside from Witch World, what work by Norton would you suggest?

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