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Fluorescent paints are fugitive because of their pigments; the medium makes little difference in their longevity.

 

So let me see if I'm understanding you Pingo, as I've been curious as how to do this, paint in a pastel or desaturated color then wash with a high contrast of the same color?

That's about it, yes. I learned this for egg tempera since I make my own paints and didn't wish to deal with the hazards of handling really toxic pigments like the cadmiums, which are some of the best (from a color, permanence, and covering power point of view) reds and yellows. I needed to work out a way to paint a bright lemon yellow using yellow ochre (= Reaper Palomino Gold), a beautiful but rather subdued natural earth yellow clay.

 

After a certain amount of experimentation, I found you can get a fairly brilliant yellow by putting down a layer of pale banana yellow mixed from white and yellow ochre (yellow ochre as I understand it = Reaper Palomino Gold), then washing over it with a thin layer of the ochre itself (assuming nothing has been added to the paint to make it more opaque). It probably helped here that I had access to French pigments as the French seem to be really serious about their ochres -- they offered all kinds of grades from gritty deep orange to one they called "most clear" which was as light and bright as yellow clay can get.

 

But even with acrylics, where fancy French ochres on the whole aren't available, a simple wash of yellow ochre over an underlayer of ochre-mixed-with-white produces a color much brighter than one would expect from such a subdued yellow.

 

The principle is to work with the paint to maximize luminosity. This works because the optical properties of a pigment are different in transparent layers and in mixes. In transparent layers even dull colors can act like stained glass (sometimes, anyway). It's why burnt sienna (= Reaper Chestnut Brown, I think) is one of my favorite glazing colors. A deep reddish brown in mass tone becomes flamelike orange in washes, and over certain purples makes a brilliant red you can't get any other way.

 

Likewise, a layer of nearly any pale blue or grey glazed over with phthalo blue (= Reaper Clear Blue) becomes almost electric.

 

I've used this technique for oil paints and acrylics as well as egg tempera. I can't vouch for all painting mediums, but it works for most of the ones modelers would use.

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@ Pingo:

 

Do you not like the Cadmium Yellow Hues? If not, why not? They look like quite saturated yellows to me.

 

ps. I don't intend to be demanding; I'm curious about the differences in pigments. If you don't have time or desire to respond, I understand.

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@ Pingo:

 

Do you not like the Cadmium Yellow Hues? If not, why not? They look like quite saturated yellows to me.

 

ps. I don't intend to be demanding; I'm curious about the differences in pigments. If you don't have time or desire to respond, I understand.

Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal. Exposure to it can cause neural damage, respiratory problems, kidney failure, bone loss, cancer, and death.

 

The cadmium pigments are some of the most stable, brightest, most permanent opaque reds, oranges, and yellows. They are indeed quite beautiful.

 

But there's that whole neural damage, respiratory problems, kidney failure, bone loss, cancer and death thing.

 

If I can paint with a substitute color, I will. Cadmiums are one of the groups of dry pigments I refuse to have in the house or studio, even moreso than lead paint.

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Unless I'm much mistaken, the Cadmium Hues contain no cadmium. (They're intended as non-toxic replacement for the cadmium pigments.)

 

I completely understand not wanting to have Cad paints around, but I was curious about the replacements.

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Unless I'm much mistaken, the Cadmium Hues contain no cadmium. (They're intended as non-toxic replacement for the cadmium pigments.)

 

I completely understand not wanting to have Cad paints around, but I was curious about the replacements.

 

Er, I was talking about why I don't use cadmium pigments specifically.

 

As for the replacement hues, I do use them in a limited capacity, although they aren't really proper substitutes for cadmium except in color. Cadmium is a completely opaque, very powerful pigment. The replacements, which are usually variations of arylide yellow (a synthetic organic compound containing carbon and chlorine) are far more transparent and weak.

 

They work even better than yellow ochre for glazing over pale yellows to make rich yellows. I just prefer to use them sparingly.

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Pingo is rapidly developing a reputation as the 'artistic knowledge goddess' be it art history, paint types, or why you should never lick your brush. If there is a question, she knows the answer, or how and where to find it. So if you need help, when the clouds are right. head to the roof and set off the Pingo signal :upside:

post-8132-0-14379900-1371849851.jpg

 

 

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