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Questions For Anne?


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  • Reaper User

Someone mentioned to me at Paint Club that there was a recent thread where people had paint questions for me. I don't have time to look for it so here's your chance--you got a question for the Meep, fire away!

 

Topics I am best at expounding on are paint-related. For those who don't know, I am She Who Makes the Paint at Reaper. :;): I have limited time due to Kickstarter fulfillment entering its final stages, but I will do my best. ::D:

 

--Anne

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  • Reaper User

Might it be possible to include Colour Index Numbers on the labels? I know they aren't required but I feel worlds better knowing what I am dealing with.

Could I ask what you mean by Colour Index Numbers?

 

If you're asking for a reference to traditional artists' hues, that I can't do. We don't use even close to the same pigments as they do in the vast majority of cases. ::):

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You answered my questions (about clears, liners, etc) in a thread already, so thanks!

Why is it so tough to glaze or highlight with white?

<snip, will come back to chalkiness>

What are the chances of the cold grey triad returning? :devil:

White pigment has the largest particulate size, has the highest coverage of any pigment, and is also the heaviest pigment. These qualities mean that there is a fine line between thinning enough to gain the translucent quality needed to glaze, and going too far--essentially "breaking" the paint by adding too much water. Rule of thumb is that a color must be thinned more to layer well the closer it gets to pure white, but be cautious. Also, thin with water, not flow improver. Though flow improver helps up to a certain point, adding extra does actually start to work against you when your paint becomes very watery.

 

You may see the midtone or highlight from the Cold Greys return (or something close, perhaps as an HD), but the triad sold much more poorly than the warm Stone Greys and neutral Greys so we are not planning to bring it back.

 

--Anne ::):

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What is Meep and why are you the Meep?

 

I would also like to thank you and Jen Haley for the Darksword Miniatures DVD. Although I'm a novice I really enjoyed it and it helped me with finding the right paint consistancy without having to guess what the consistancy of milk is. Im sure I will be referring to it often.

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Might it be possible to include Colour Index Numbers on the labels? I know they aren't required but I feel worlds better knowing what I am dealing with.

 

You might want to explain exactly why/what this is about.

 

On the thread "Plans to Paint on the Cheap" there was something of a derail starting on this page: http://www.reapermini.com/forum/index.php?/topic/49906-plans-to-paint-on-the-cheap/page-4 about whether or not it was useful information to know what pigments were going into which Reaper paints.

 

There seems to be a legal distinction made between artists' paints (which apparently must list pigments used) and hobby and craft paints (which evidently don't).

 

Fanguad made a good argument that for most hobbyists the descriptive color names were far more useful than pigment names (and what would you call mixes anyway?). So I posited a compromise of a note somewhere on the label of the Colour Index Numbers, which are far more compact than pigment names.

 

 

Might it be possible to include Colour Index Numbers on the labels? I know they aren't required but I feel worlds better knowing what I am dealing with.

Could I ask what you mean by Colour Index Numbers?

If you're asking for a reference to traditional artists' hues, that I can't do. We don't use even close to the same pigments as they do in the vast majority of cases. ::):

They are the standardized codes for every pigment, dye, and colorant used in the industry, not simply artist's pigments, but every substance used to color products. There's a massive database maintained by the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists here: http://www.colour-index.com/

 

I don't mean to be pushy. I am curious about the information and I like to know what I'm working with.

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How long does it take to paint a standard mini?

It varies by the painter and the mini. ::): For me? I'm a relatively slow painter. No airbrushing and I take a fair amount of time to clean the model beforehand (removing mold lines and such).

 

"Quick" paint job, minimum 4-5 hours. Reaper gallery paint job, 8-10 hours unless I'm having fun and pushing it a little, then 10-15 hours. ::;):

 

Reaper gallery quality 54 mm around 15-20 hours.

 

Reaper gallery 72 mm. 40-plus hours.

 

Reaper gallery Dragons, 50-plus hours.

 

Minimum time ever spent on a competition-level 28 mm miniature, 40 hours. Average 50-60 hours.

 

Most time ever spent on a model, competition-level dragon, 125 hours--still not done and the last 10 hours (on the rider) were rushed. :;): Might revisit it eventually, or may just remain a cool Zombie Dragon that needs a better base!

 

--Anne

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What makes paint chalky and how do I fix it?

 

 

Several things can create the effect we know as "chalkiness". Usually it results from over-thinning a light-colored paint, often a pale skintone. In this case (referencing the previous explanation above about How White Is Weird) the paint separates and essentially breaks down, then coats unevenly. You can also see this happen (for a different reason) in paints which use heavier particulate matter (such as various forms of clay) as flatting agents, and in paints with a cheaper base or less pigment (easier to "break" by adding too much water, such as some brands of craft paint). Not shaking the bottle sufficiently can cause uneven distribution of solids and make paint break down faster under application of lots of water.

 

The fix is to go back to your non-chalky midtone or even a shadow color and glaze with it. ::): You'll then usually have to re-apply your highest highlight, but since your highest highlight is usually focused in a very small area, you shouldn't see a recurrence of the issue. In the future you could try painting with slightly thicker paint and glazing to blend the layers.

 

If you have a paint color that is seriously having issues and has since day one, it is possible that it was frozen in transit to the store, or the distributor. Freezing tends to make certain parts of some paints fall out of solution to the point where recombining them firmly is almost impossible. In the case of a bad bottle, contact Reaper customer service for a replacement. ::):

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I bought a few clearance bin Reaper paints a little bit ago and some of them are VERY thick. As in almost toothpaste consistency. I added a few drops of distilled water and that seems to have helped, but I am wondering what causes this and if what I did is the right thing.

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