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Paint or assemble first?


arkrim
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So my reaper minis finally came in the mail! Yay! They're awesome, but I'm having a little trouble with the assembly so if any of you more experienced folks could help me out I'd really appreciate it.

 

Issue #1: One of the figurines' legs are spread in a manner that does not fit the base. Namely, the Cthulhu one (the Kaladrax is giving me a little trouble too but not as much). I would litterally have to bend the legs awkwardly to make it fit on its base. Is this normal for reaper products? What do I need to do to fix it? Or do I need to call reaper and ask them for an exchange? What does everyone else normally do in this situation?

 

Issue #2: Are you supposed to paint all the pieces first or assemble and glue them together first? Does anyone know?

Edited by arkrim
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Issue 1: To repose Bones body parts:

 

1) Heat the figure (boiling water works well) until the part gets soft and rather floppy. If it's a thick part, the heat can take several minutes to reach the core; make sure it's heated all the way through.

 

2) When it's soft enough, repose the part. It often works best to bend the part significantly past the point where you want it to live forever, to reduce the chance of reverting later.

 

3) While the part is still soft (so go quickly in #2), dunk it into icewater and leave it for a while until the heat has leached out again. After this, the rigidity will be much like it was at the start of the project.

 

Issue 2:

 

Depends. If you can reach the parts for painting after assembly, you're generally better off to assemble, then paint. This prevents paint damage during assembly and facilitates blending across joints. If that won't work well enough, then you might want to paint first, then assemble, then touch up any problem areas.

 

Welcome to the boards.

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Thanks! I've always loved minis, but I could never get primers on correctly. The new minis that don't need primers are awesome.

 

Thanks for the advice. I'll do that! I'm assuming I just dip in boiling water for a few seconds right? I don't want it to melt onto the pot. Or will it not do that because of the material it's made of?

 

I'm so glad these forums are here. I'd be so lost without them.

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The Bonesium material will soften to the point of becoming floppy in boiling water, but that is not hot enough to actually melt it. Very thin figures like the skeletons need barely a second to turn floppy, while large figures like the storm giant might need several minutes in the bath.

 

It's probably a good safety precaution to have a steamer basket in your pot to keep the figure away from direct contact with the stove-heated metal. Water that's heated to its boiling point turns to steam and bubbles out unless it's kept under pressure, so there's a physical limit to how hot the water can get, but the pot its self can get quite a bit hotter.

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On issue 2, I would say it depends on the miniature.

 

If you can at all help it, assembling / gluing beforehand would be optimal (as already pointed out). However assembling some minis may create a harder to reach area to paint depending on what kind of paint effects. That said, the glue will bond better to unpainted surfaces than a painted one.

 

Fortunately, a few of the Bones minis I have seen (some of the larger ones for instance) have 'pegs' and 'holes' to fit in. You could paint all the pieces but leave the sections to be glued untouched since these will be not seen anyway. Touch ups can be done after the fact and you may avoid some awkward painting situations. :)

 

M

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Issue #2

It depends on a few things. In some cases, it is better to assemble the minis before painting. Some of the massive models may need to be base painted before assembly just out of convinience. I have found Cthulhu to be a bit unweildy. Haven't started Kaladrx, but I plan to do the base work and some layering before assembly, but he has very natural seams and won't need shading over them.

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I am planning on boiling my Cthulhus (I have 2) and then quickly putting him on his base and then plunge both parts together into the cold water bath. I'm hoping that this will allow his legs to eventually stay put in the right places to fit onto his base- which he doesn't right now.

 

I hope the same process will work on both Nethys. Everything fits together okay for the 3 Kalys.

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