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Miliput, Greenstuff, or ProCreat?


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hello all another sculpting/clay question. Ive been mainly using sculpey then i moved to supersculpey firm, now i think id like to get some 2 part putty to do some layering on things like treasure chests and other little projects i was thinking about getting some standard miliput to start off with mainly cause of the price (10 dollars including shipping on ebay for a pound) and i dont know how much im going to waste trying to learn the new medium lol. Having said that what does anyone else think? Would it be a good step?

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Milliput works VERY differently from GS or Procreate. Milliput is very clay like when mixed. It is water soluble so you can use a brush and water to smooth it out, but it will also develop a slip (just like clay). When cured Milliput is rock hard and works great when being sanded or filed. However, the dust from Milliput is toxic, so you will need a dust collection system and a good particulate filter mask i. e. a respirator with 3m filters on it, not just a cheapie dust mask.

 

GS and procreate are both soft putties. When mixed they are the consistency of warm saltwater taffy. When cured they are plastic like. Not quite as good when filing or sanding, but still acceptable. These putties really excel at organic shapes and humanoid figures. I prefer GS because that's what I started with, but a lot of new sculptors like the way procreate handles. It tends to be more forgiving and holds its shape easier than GS.

 

Price wise they are similar. Procreate is the most expensive, GS is in the middle, and Milliput is the least expensive. You're talking high end prices $15 and low end prices $8.

 

Hope that helps ~

Gene

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It may have been the way I stored it, but I've found the procreate I bought to try went quite hard. Its still useable but not as nice to use as my green stuff.

I also highly recommend eventually trying to mix green stuff and milliput, the resulting putty is lovely to work with.

 

So all in all, I recommend green stuff, for its workability as opposed to milliput which I found difficult to work with at small scales (though perhaps the fine white version is better for this). Milliput in my experience had a habit of breaking apart or tearing when made for pieces too small or thin.

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Milliput sounds like it's quite similar to the Apoxie Sculpt I've been using. Apoxie Sculpt a two part putty that acts very much like clay (which, given my background in ceramics, I quite prefer), is smoothable with water, has a working time of 2-3 hours and dries quite hard. It does have the benefit of being non-toxic; however, the packaging still recommends using a dust mask and safety glasses while sanding/grinding, and wearing disposable gloves while mixing the two parts. I've only used it for gap-filling, which it has done very well. :)

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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Fletch_Talon and OneBoot both bring up good points.

 

Store your epoxy components in seperate airtight containers. I use the smallest ziploc tupperware things. That will keep them fresh MUCH longer. If you want to store epoxy almost indefinitely, put them in their separate containers and store them in the freezer. Pull out only enough to use when needed. It'll keep forever that way.

 

Milliput is difficult to use at our scale. It does work well when blended with GS. I would stick with the standard grey/yellow Milliput. The Superfine White Milliput becomes too brittle when cured, almost like a soft plaster. Very crumbly... Blech!

 

Another note on mixing... You can mix epoxy putty and polymer clay together. I would keep the ratio fairly low like 10% -15% sculpey to 85% -90% putty. You don't need to bake it as the clay and putty both have petrochemical long chain polymer molecules in them that play nicely together. And you get the best of both worlds. The epoxy becomes more claylike in consistency and is workable for up to four hours (depending upon when you mix the clay in), and it also becomes much more forgiving. This would be my choice of sculpting medium if I was starting all over again!

 

Milliput is very similar to Aves and also Magic Sculpt. If you're going for sheer quantity, magic sculpt beats all the others hands down. You get a 5lb tub of resin AND hardener (10lbs total) for like $30.

 

Ultimately you'll have to end up experimenting with various putties and mixes to find the ones that work best for you.

 

Gene

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I appreciate all the help im trying to put together a sort of dungeon accessory kind of deal at the moment i have sculpted a very nice fireplace that will light up with an LED and im trying to create a treasure chest that actually opens im also going to try and make a few other things i just havent decided what would really go well for dungeon dressing that might not already be out there

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I bought a 5 lb kit of Magic Sculpt about 8 years ago and have barely made a dent in it, since I mostly use it for tiny applications like gap-filling and joint-blending. I haven't got into much full-figure modeling yet. It has a smooth, almost waxy consistency and can preserve fine details like fingerprints or take a high polish. It used to come in just pale gray but now they make it in other colors. The one thing I don't like about it is that it gets stuck in my fingertips during mixing. Also a friend of mine discovered he's allergic to it. Breaks out in hives, he does.

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ive been watching some videos about green stuff and i like the way it looks like it handles and on top of that all comments about it i think im going to pick some up. Its only 14 dollars for 36 inches on ebay, although im not exactly sure weight wise what that equates to...Now does anyone have any suggestions as to what would be good exercises to practice or things i should start out trying to do? I was thinking about adding a cloak of backpack to one of my minis

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ive been watching some videos about green stuff and i like the way it looks like it handles and on top of that all comments about it i think im going to pick some up. Its only 14 dollars for 36 inches on ebay, although im not exactly sure weight wise what that equates to...Now does anyone have any suggestions as to what would be good exercises to practice or things i should start out trying to do? I was thinking about adding a cloak of backpack to one of my minis

 

Honestly, I started with sculpting Rocks and Stumps on bases and the scales and fur on multi-part models. Rocks are harder than you think and give a lot of good texture and tool practice.

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If you can find them, go for the tubes of greenstuff vs the strips. There is the same amount of GS in both forms, but the strip has a little cured bit in the center of it that must be cut out before using. The tubes are already seperated for you so there's much less waste.

 

Gene

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