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Most Popular Colours?


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Hi folks,

 

I was wondering what Reaper's most popular paint colors were. As a new painter, I'm trying to select the colours that I will get the most mileage out of first rather than ones that I'll use only once.

 

I'm just wondering if it would be at all possible to list the 10 or 15 most popular requests. I have quickly discovered that Walnut Brown fairly ubiquitous, as it seems to be a workhorse like Devlan Mud used to be (quick wash shader, liner, base for leathers). Pure White and Black are likewise pretty handy, as they can brighten or darken almost everything.

 

Are there other colours that folks are getting tons of use out of? Reaperites, what colours are you buying constantly?

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Well I just started painting this year, so I havn't really run out of anything yet.

I have a wider selection of browns than anything else.

3 browns, a tan + brown ink wash, 2 blacks + ink wash, 2 whites, 2 greens, 2 yellows, 3 flesh (triad)

I am running low only glossy black, as it goes into so many washes and shade layers.

Edited by Evilhalfling
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Pure Black

Pure White

Walnut Brown

Linen White

 

I keep a paint case with all the paints I'm currently using, those four are permanently in there for warm and cool white/black. I've started to use creamy ivory after Anne was gushing about it on her DVD and DKS also uses it in his brown base recipe.

 

Oiled Leather is another good one. Brown Liner might be closer to devlan mud, I don't use GW paints :)

 

I've been doing nmm for about six months now, so the colors from L2PK3 have moved into residence in my case.

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Brown Liner

Blue Liner

Creamy Ivory

Linen White

Ghost White

Muddy Brown/Earth Brown/Leather Brown

Woodstain Brown/Shield Brown/Driftwood Brown

Walnut Brown/Blackened Brown

Chestnut Gold

 

Those are the ones I replace the most.

Edited by TaleSpinner
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Not a Reaper color, but the bottle I find myself reaching for almost too often is Liquitex Chromium Oxide Green. It's a deep, earthy green that's super-opaque even when highly thinned.

 

Another color I couldn't do without is Golden Zinc White (as far as I know only Golden Artist Colors puts pure zinc oxide white in an acrylic). It's slightly translucent and I find it virtually a requirement for getting smoothly blended skin tones.

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Brown Liner

Blue Liner

Creamy Ivory

Linen White

Ghost White

Muddy Brown/Earth Brown/Leather Brown

Woodstain Brown/Shield Brown/Driftwood Brown

Walnut Brown/Blackened Brown

Chestnut Gold

 

Those are the ones I replace the most.

 

I understand the browns and off-whites, but what do you use the liners for? Paint is an emulsion in acrylic medium, Ink is pure pigment (in water?), Washes are paints thinned with water, and Glazes are paints thinned with medium...but I don't know what a Liner is.

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Not a Reaper color, but the bottle I find myself reaching for almost too often is Liquitex Chromium Oxide Green. It's a deep, earthy green that's super-opaque even when highly thinned.Another color I couldn't do without is Golden Zinc White (as far as I know only Golden Artist Colors puts pure zinc oxide white in an acrylic). It's slightly translucent and I find it virtually a requirement for getting smoothly blended skin tones.

Chromium Oxide Green is a highly toxic heavy metal, so handle with care.

 

Golden is indeed the only manufacturer of Zinc White in acrylics. I have some; it is quite transparent and delicate. It has some serious drawbacks in oil paint, but so far as I know it's okay in acrylics.

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I understand the browns and off-whites, but what do you use the liners for? Paint is an emulsion in acrylic medium, Ink is pure pigment (in water?), Washes are paints thinned with water, and Glazes are paints thinned with medium...but I don't know what a Liner is.

From the lady who makes them:

 

 

Liners: more fluid base requires less thinning, more translucent; meant for dark-lining applications; more thinning will give you a softer, more natural line; less thinning will give you a bolder, more stylistic line.

 

Clears: more transparent. Meant to be mixed into other paints to intensify color or as glazes over painted areas to intensify color. Excellent for mixing, as very little is added except the single pigment (Clear Red is red pigment in a red base, for example).

 

Shadow colors: same as normal MSP, just dark. Some are based on old liner colors, but the current iteration acts like our regular line.

 

Washes, Inks: SHAKE WELL. Meant to be used as a quick-shading technique. Washes usually work straight out of the bottle, though if you prefer a more subtle effect you might thin with either water or brush-on sealer. Washes are also matte. Inks are shiny, work best in shading metallics. Some inks will bleed their color if normal paint is applied on top. We are looking at getting rid of inks as sales are not supporting them right now and the washes are more versatile and popular...but that decision will be a while coming.

 

Anti-Shine Additive: Add a VERY small amount to a glossy color in order to make it dead matte. Usually works with other brands of paint, too. Don't add too much or the color will get frosty!

 

Drying Retarder: Add a very small amount to make your paint not dry as fast on the palette. The trade-off is that all drying retarders inhibit adhesion to some extent--so if you use them they will make your paint rub off easier, especially on metal models (haven't experimented with resin or Bones).

 

Okay, back to work...seriously, gotta bust out the rest of this Kickstarter paint! :;):

 

--Anne ::D:

 

Also, washes and glazes can be thinned with water, medium, or whatever you want. A glaze tends to be thinner than a wash. A wash is applied more thickly to an area and flows easily off the brush, a glaze is applied more like a layer, in a controlled fashion. These terms are also very vague with many answers, but the thinning agent isn't what determines one or t'other.

Edited by CashWiley
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You may wish to examine the Reaper Learn to Paint Kits if you're planning on buying Reaper paints. They come with full bottles of each color, not sample paints as they used to, with no price increase. A very good deal if you can make use of the minis, brushes, and instructions included in the kits.

 

There are some cool WIP threads like this one for LTPK1 here on the forums if you want to see what other painters are doing with them.

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Reaper is unlikely to tell you what sells, as they generally don't release sales data.

 

However I seem to have on my palette all the time:

 

Rosy skin triad

Tanned skin triad

Ochre golds triad

black

white

linen

bone shadow

stormy grey

carnage or blood red

moth green

jade green

Ritterlich blue

a variety of browns

 

I use more than this, of course, but these colors always seem to be there.

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Nobody's mentioned Chestnut Brown, so I have to put that one up. It's a WONDERFUL red-brown, which works beautifully for leather, clay, brick, as a basecoat for ruddier flesh, an element in rust, and many other applications. Also stone grey, and many of those already mentioned (linen white, walnut brown, etc.) Oh, and Nightshade Purple! Another near-black, like Walnut, but visually tends to play better with greens and blues than black does.

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Brush on primer also good. I'm also a fan of walnut brown, nightshade purple, pure and linen white, carnage red, marine teal (still like vallejo blue green a bit better but it's growing on me), saffron sunset (although I still like my vallejo yellow ochre...), tanned highlight and intense brown. The brilliant green triad has been good to me as well.

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Thanks all.

 

 

You may wish to examine the Reaper Learn to Paint Kits if you're planning on buying Reaper paints. They come with full bottles of each color, not sample paints as they used to, with no price increase. A very good deal if you can make use of the minis, brushes, and instructions included in the kits.

 

There are some cool WIP threads like this one for LTPK1 here on the forums if you want to see what other painters are doing with them.

 

I actually purchased LTPK1&2, and I have Paint Set 1 from the Kickstarter on its way. I just wanted to know if there were ways that I should be growing my collection. Don't want to drop $180 all at once for a paint set. As nice as it would be to have every single colour, I'll grow my collection slowly. I'll likely grab the other 3 LTPKs to complete my collection.

 

It sounds like I cast my eyes towards a bunch of browns, a few off-whites, and a few natural colors like ochre, grey, and olive.

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